UKC

/ North, Mid, South Wales? confused

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The Potato - on 12 Jul 2018

I definitely live in north Wales, however im really confused as to where mid and south wales begin/end, can anyone educate me please? Logically to me it would be divided in to equal thirds, however Dyfi valley is classed as north wales despite it being in the middle, and Llandovery in mid wales despite it being in the lower third.

Post edited at 20:20
Dave the Rave on 12 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Mid starts at Welshpool and ends at Brecon. All south from there.

Moley on 12 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

We lived in mid Wales, if you stuck a pin in the middle of Wales, that was where we lived - near llanidloes. Obvious.

Now we live further south near llandovery and still refer to it as mid Wales, because South Wales is understood as south of the beacons. Although I think we are south, we aren't, we are south of mid as opposed to Welshpool which is north of mid. I think mid Wales is everything not covered by north or south.

Clear now ?

Moley on 12 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

And some people refer to west Wales, Pembrokeshire usually.

But is there such an area as East Wales? Never heard of it.

dobby 200 - on 12 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

I live in Tywyn, definitely mid wales. I call the Dovey estuary the boarder between North and South Wales, probably because that is the boarder between the north and south counties.

aln - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to Moley:

> But is there such an area as East Wales? Never heard of it.

England? 

 

2
Welsh Kate - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to Moley:

Gwent, I suspect, in that east Wales feels like the south-east bit; otherwise it's the borders.

Since I live on the south coast, I definitely live in South Wales; for me, mid Wales starts at Brecon as Dave the Rave says. West Wales is a separate entity, I suspect in the same way that, having grown up in west Dorset, I'd regard that as being the west rather than the south of England!

ianstevens - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to Moley:

> And some people refer to west Wales, Pembrokeshire usually.

> But is there such an area as East Wales? Never heard of it.

Mold, Wrexham et al? Aka, Liverpool suburbs.

My 10 pence worth: North Wales in my mind starts with the Snowdonia border - so the Dyfi Estuary. South Wales I'm a little more grey on - but I'd agree with the general south of the Brecon Beacons sentiment, perhaps using the northern border of the Brecon Beacons as the boundary.

afshapes - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Mach is the start of north wales. 

Brecon the end of mid Wales. 

 

The Potato - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to dobby 200:

Border.

Tywyn is in Gwynedd which is north Wales

Bulls Crack - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Most of Wales apprently

 

http://www.wales.com/mid

ballsac - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

might the borders of mid and south wales be as much cultural/economic as geographical?

for me, Llandovery is Mid-Wales because it is agricultural, not industrial/post-industrial/urban/sub-urban - its also north of Brecon, with is absolutely Mid-Wales.

Dave Williams - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

The area covered by the new Central Wales climbing guidebook - basically from the Dyfi Estuary to the Brecon Beacons - is, as has been already said by several posters, the area normally considered to be Mid Wales.

In recent years and certainly within Wales, the revival of a very old name - Elenydd - has become increasingly common and is basically used to deliniate/identify the Cambrian Mountains area in Mid Wales. See: https://steepstoneclimbing.co.uk/guide

A deliberate decision was made to use Central Wales for the new guidebook rather than the more commonly used Mid Wales, as there was a Climbers' Club guide published in 1988, written by John Sumner, which was named 'Mid Wales'. 

https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/book.php?id=148  Despite the title, the area covered by this 1988 guide was most definitely not what most people would identify as Mid Wales, not now nor actually even in 1988!

As an aside, the CC has shown a pretty poor understanding of Welsh geography in the past, so perhaps some climbers' current confusion is understandable . 

Mid Wales' replacement by the CC was called 'Meirionnydd' (''Merioneth/ Merionethshire''), a local government area, now subsumed into Gwynedd, which has always been considered as North rather than Mid Wales. While this guidebook name was far more correct for most of the guidebook area, the CC still confusingly muddied the waters as Meirionnydd includes climbing in the Dolwyddelan and Betws y Coed areas (i.e. in Caernarfonshire, now Gwynedd) as well as  in the Berwynion in NE Wales (i.e. in Montgomeryshire, now Powys).

The confusion continues as, more recently, the CC Pembroke North guidebook describes some of the climbing north of Llangrannog, which is actually in Ceredigion (i.e. Mid Wales), some 30 miles north of the county boundary of Pembrokeshire (i.e. South Wales).

Hopefully that's cleared it all up nicely. ;-)

 

 

Post edited at 12:15
ianstevens - on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to Dave Williams:

Most shameless plug I've seen in a while.

1
profitofdoom on 13 Jul 2018
In reply to The Potato:

Do not forget northeast Wales, northwest Wales, southeast Wales, southwest Wales, mid-central Wales, north mid-central Wales, east mid-central Wales, west mid-central Wales, and south mid-central Wales


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