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Old age affecting adventure activities

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 Earlgreytea 07 Dec 2021

How many of you have been restricted in your outdoor activities due to age and health issues? Post 50 I'm lucky if I can walk ten miles with a small pack of maybe 8kg, without being laid up in bed the following day in agony. Just wondered if there is were any more by ol' folk be affected by aging. Not being in able to climb north faces and carry 18kg loads any more.

9
In reply to Earlgreytea:

tob a ti si ???

:-D

1
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I'd be going to a specialist to be checked out, I think? My Dad climbed Tent Peak in Napal in his mid 50's. Unless it's previous heavy loads which have had an effect.

 colinakmc 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I’m a bit older than you, I have a bit of a scoliosis which I need to manage with anti-inflammatory meds. For what it’s worth I submitted Mont Blanc at 52, Jungfrau at 56,  Nadelhorn at 58, and stayed a night at the Marguerita hut at 64. At 70, I find it increasingly hard to maintain hill fitness, last week I felt as though I’d burst my boiler with just a walk up one of our simpler Munros. (Admittedly recovering from the ubercold that everyone seems to be passing around currently!)

I’m guessing that’s down to age related muscle mass loss, declining lung capacity, and diminishing max heart rate. Pain needs a bit more analysis - back? Knees? Feet or ankles? but might respond to targeted remedial exercises. My best friends for pain are anti-inflammatories and Rock Tape!

In reply to Earlgreytea:

At 62 (and for the last few years) I find that my knees are sore after a day's walking in the hills - I simply wouldn't fancy walking 2 days in a row - not sure how much I'd manage on day 2, but I'm not really inclined to find out. I'm pretty sure that it's the descents that do it - increased shock loading - I should probably get some poles and learn to use them; I also suspect that it won't be that long before at least one of them is looked at by a specialist ☹.

Similarly after a bouldering session (inside or outside), my body doesn't seem to fancy the idea of 2 days in a row - and the knees might feel bad as well if I've descended many times during an "easy gritstone route" soloing session.

None of this is currently causing any real issues, I simply spread activities across the week; run one day, weights session the next, run on day 3, climbing wall next day - you see the idea. I'd be surprised if there's anything I could do training wise that would get my recovery times (which is basically the problem) back to what they used to be 20-30 years ago.

 neilh 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

Roughly follow your pattern and same age.

Weight training is I consider  far more critical to maintaining fitness than say using a climbing wall.

2
 David Myatt 07 Dec 2021
In reply to colinakmc:

Colin, you forgot hips, shoulders, elbows and wrists (my fingers are ok)

😉

 Duncan Bourne 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I find i need a bit of recupration after a day of activity. Left knee plays up and i do my damnedist not to over load it. Generally it is a lack of energy that does for me though. The tank empties quick than it did when I was young and even minor injuries take an age to heal.

Mentally I am disinclined to push the boat out on some sketchy route, which is probably the product of lack of practice as much as thinking too much of the consequences of what falling off will do to my creaky limbs

 Duncan Bourne 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

That's more or less me.

Climbing wall and weights, plus i still cycle everywhere. Running is pretty much out though as it buggers up my shins everytime

 colinakmc 07 Dec 2021
In reply to David Myatt:

No, I forgot head, shoulders knees and toes, knees and toes…..😳

 Tom Valentine 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

i never climbed a north face even when I was fit. Unless you count Kinder North Edge.  Are they worse on your knees than South Faces?

 Bojo 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Not sure how I fit in to the equation but four years ago I did the tour de Mont Blanc(solo and without baggage transfers). Two years ago(just pre-pandemic)I did the Everest Base Camp trek. I hill walk in the UK when I can but admittedly not regularly. My rucksack on a day walk is usually circa 5kg. On the TMB I was probably carrying 9-10 kg. Admittedly no camping gear - I did hut to hut). Twelve years ago I had cancer.

I'm now 73

 Lankyman 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

> tob a ti si ???

> :-D

ylbissop

1
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers:

Funnily enough I'm over 80% of the way through that (after having done the Wainwrights). Hopefully finishing the rest of them this winter before the bracken comes back (I only made the mistake of going up an obscure low bracken covered pathless summit once).

Then it's back to the remaining LD Nuttall's and the remaining Birkett's and Synge's and anything else. I don't know whether the DoBIH is a blessing or a curse 😁

 mutt 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

as others have said, weight training under the eye of a professional trainer is  - barring actual medical conditions - the solution to your problems. Indeed I was feeling somewhat infirm at 50 with sore knees and inflexible and generally feeling worn  out. At 51 all that has gone. Building up muscle protects joints. Bouldering  endurance has gone from 1.5 hours to 5.5. hours. 

In reply to Michael Hood:

I compleated the SMCs Full House in October. Not that I'm giving up hill bagging because I'm in my 60s but I am turning it down a bit. Knocking off my remaining Wainwrights will be something of a project for my later years. After bashing up and down some rough Grahams and Donalds I'm ready to walk on a path!

M

 SteveSBlake 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I have a long list of injuries that I'm very familiar with that I successfully manage. Despite these I'm still very active and did a 'North Face' last year with a partner of the same age (65).

Most of my peers are doing very well, with a range of replacement knees and hips providing a renewed lease of life! But we are all different, and the difference becomes more apparent the older we get. I swear there are folks on here who have Titanium in their genes....

What works for some may not work for you. The trick is to find out what does work and then persist with it.

Good luck,

Steve

 PaulW 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Aged 66 I have been into yoga/pilates for a couple of years now. Lots of low impact stuff.

Things hurt less than they did a decade ago.

 Rob Exile Ward 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Let drugs be your friend...

I take NSAIDs before a big(ish) day and usually feel as fit as ever I did. I was diagnosed with 'pernicious anaemia' 6 months ago, treatment for that has been simple but pretty life changing - maybe get checked?

To our surprise and delight, me and a similar aged mate did the Forbes Arete 4 years ago, a 22 hour day. We were 64 and 63; I genuinely don't think it would have felt much easier 30 years ago.

 keith sanders 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Tom Valentine:

That depends on which Hemershere your in.

keith s

 tlouth7 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

If so they have absolutely nailed the demographic!

In reply to tlouth7:

> If so they have absolutely nailed the demographic!

;-D

retupmoc gninrael a sti llew

 girlymonkey 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

!yletinifed

In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

Tried to blow your mind with a few palindromes here -  redivider, deified, civic, radar etc but I'm not clever enough to craft a decent sentence out of them

 deepsoup 07 Dec 2021
In reply to stealth_mode_rob:

Ooh, good idea.  Here's a diet tip for the OP: No lemons no melon!

In reply to Earlgreytea:

My biggest problem is cowardice, arthritis and increasing timidity means I'm happier with 2 bouldering mats. I've not weighed them but it feels 'plenty' picking over loose slopes, after a longer walk in. Bah!

In reply to Earlgreytea:

486f77277320796f75722073636166666f6c64696e67207468696e6720676f696e673f

1
 alan edmonds 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

I seem to recall Chris Brasher promoting his walking poles as saving the weight of three elephants on an average mountain walk.

In reply to alan edmonds:

What if you don’t normally take three elephants on your walk?

 JohnnyMac 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

It’s easy to lose fitness and harder to recover from injury but met plenty 70+ in the huts still having proper adventures

Hear that not stopping is the key to continuing.

 Lankyman 07 Dec 2021
In reply to alan edmonds:

> I seem to recall Chris Brasher promoting his walking poles as saving the weight of three elephants on an average mountain walk.

If he was carrying three elephants I can see why he needed poles

 alan moore 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

55. Weak as a kitten, always was. No interest in big rucsacs or North Faces.

Having a great time.

 Moacs 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

57

Replacement hip. Removed prostate/ radiotherapy/ongoing. Hernia repair.  Yes my lower torso looks like Edward Scissorhands' lost body. Oh, and glaucoma.

Stiff knees downhill. Stiff lower back due to previous injury. Otherwise good. Struggle with high step moves.

15 miles is a good walk. Climb 6b/HVS. 

Pretty happy

Just data

In reply to Earlgreytea:

I have decided getting old is total crap. Knee's and back painful all the time but most of the time I can ignore it and crack on.

Recently my hip started hurting, hurting as in every step feels like a knife twisting in it.

Mostly self inflicted though, I have done a lot of sports and worn things out, I used to be strong as an ox and used to carry 100kg Blowers from my van, across site then install them in a cabinet on my own.

Even though I am broken and have lost enough strength that I struggle with a 40kg blower these days I was still fit. Was is the key word though.

I had a wee heart attack back in March this year and though I can walk for miles on the flat I get out of breath very fast even on small hill's, I don't mean hill hill's, I mean little hills on the streets.

I'm only 49 so I dread to think what is to come. 

In reply to Earlgreytea:

> How many of you have been restricted in your outdoor activities due to age and health issues? Post 50 I'm lucky if I can walk ten miles with a small pack of maybe 8kg,

Old age, post 50?  Seriously?

 jcw 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Dave Garnett:

i believe there are three  essentials for keeping going 

1 your genes

2 pacing yourself as you get older

3 a determination to keep going. Get out even if it is not pleasant. Better a stiff,literally, walk than a climbing wall.

i found that the final decline set in at 80

In reply to Dax H:

Have you been given any medical knowledge on whether the breathlessness will last?

 Welsh Kate 07 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

56 and an operational member of a mountain rescue team. I'm not as strong as most of the blokes, I'm not as fast as the young racing snakes, but I can hold my own (and my corner of a loaded stretcher). I do weights, beat the cr@p out of the punch bag and lots of step-ups at the gym along with cv exercise. I think I'm probably as fit and strong as I was ten years ago.

In reply to Timmd:

> Have you been given any medical knowledge on whether the breathlessness will last?

Not yet. I had the mri in June and only got the results back last month. The letter says they will ring me to arrange a time for the consultant to ring me to discuss the next steps. 

Had I gone to hospital when I had it in March I would probably been sorted out that weekend but it was only arm pain so I took some tramadol and went back to bed. Wife nadgered me and I went yo the doctor a few days later, que a week or so for the ecg, a month fur the ultra sound, 6 weeks for the mri, 5 month to get the results and now 1 month still waiting for the phone call. I'm part of the x million backlogged cases I suppose.

Interestligly though 2 weeks after the mri the research department of Leeds hospital rang me on a Wednesday. Would I submit to another mri stress test on their new advanced scanner. Because they had recent results only 2 weeks old they wanted to compare results from their new toy as part of their study in to the new machine. 2 days later I was on the machine. That doctor told me at the end that I had definitely had a heart attack at the end of the scan 4.5 month before my own doctor told me anything. 

 veteye 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Dax H:

So is there an hereditary possibility in the problem, or do you have a less than optimal diet, or both?

Are there other factors that you can improve upon in the meantime? Or that your GP can do in a general sense in the meantime? Are you a case for use of Statins? Have you seen your blood results? If you have not, then go in person to the GP's surgery and have them print a copy. That's what I do.

 Rob Exile Ward 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Dax H:

I know genes and the rest are important, but what has surprised me is that my inevitable decline hasn't been linear - some months/years I've had any number of issues but then either time or medication have reduced them, and I've bounced back, if not quite to where I was but back to fully functioning.

Last summer I struggled on a V Diff on Grey Crag; I'm anticipating ticking at least HVS and hopefully E1s in the Spring.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

61, still climbing/training four or five times a week. Definitely not climbing as hard as I once did, but somehow now it seems more precious and I think I’m enjoying it more. 

In reply to stealth_mode_rob:

> Tried to blow your mind with a few palindromes here -  redivider, deified, civic, radar etc but I'm not clever enough to craft a decent sentence out of them

?Glenelg ni evil uoy od

 Fat Bumbly2 08 Dec 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

60, ankles went arthritic  10 years ago. climbing stopped. Bikes and packrafts are my new friends. Still getting out there.

 Trangia 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Do share with us stories about the north faces you used to climb? Or south, east or west faces?

 streapadair 08 Dec 2021
In reply to colinakmc:

>  stayed a night at the Marguerita hut at 64. 

I can beat that, young 'un. Was there August of last year on my 73rd birthday, came back over Punta Parrot. Hoping to get back next year for Punta Zumstein and Liskamm Orientale.                        

In reply to thread:

The 2003 FRCC selected guide has a lovely photo of Eagle's Nest Ridge Direct (VS 4b) with the caption "JR and AS (with a combined age of over 150) climbing ENRD" (my abbreviations).

I always take this to mean that I've (hopefully) got until I'm at least 75 to still be doing some significant outdoor activities.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

Fifties - prime of life

Sixties - you might still be able to imagine you’re in your fifties 

Seventies - no denying you’re getting on a bit, but still do what you can. 

In reply to PaulW:

> Aged 66 I have been into yoga/pilates for a couple of years now. Lots of low impact stuff.

> Things hurt less than they did a decade ago.

I’ve recently got into reformer pilates on the advice of my daughter who has inherited from me a tendency to develop muscle strains and spasms. It’s not easy to find someone trained in this and also has the equipment but worth it. I’m currently having 1 hour 1-to-1 every two or three weeks. I can honestly say I feel 10 years younger after a session. 

In reply to veteye:

As soon as they did the ECG and found something abnormal I put 2 and 2 together.

Diet change, now instead of find the carrot my plate is find the bacon. Crisps and scratchings gone, more exercise (not so much at the moment due to hip though), reduced hours at work, currently shooting for a maximum of 50 hours a week and I want to hit 40 eventually. Salt gone too.

Been over weight for years but my blood pressure and cholesterol have always been fine.  Now they are not fine it's time to take responsibility. On tablets for both but only low dose because they are still okay all be it the top end of okay.

My dad died 6 months before his 60th of a sudden heart attack, my grandad was a few months over 60 when he went so there may be a hereditary side of it but physiologically speaking I take after the men on my mums side (mum is the only woman to get past 60 but men go for years.)

So the changes have been made, no way am I waiting for the NHS. 

To give you an idea of how much I'm like mum's side of the family. A photo of my and a photo of my great great grandad Thaddeus. 


 Trangia 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Rog Wilko:

> Fifties - prime of life

> Sixties - you might still be able to imagine you’re in your fifties 

> Seventies - no denying you’re getting on a bit, but still do what you can. 

Spot on !

The next decade Eighties is only 2 years away for me now, and I await it with interest. I anticipate that I shall still be able to walk up to 10 plus miles a day, although the pace may be a little slower.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

What you describe isn’t normal for an active person in their 50s.  Was your decline sudden and unexpected?  Worth speaking to GP to see what’s going on.

 wercat 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Trangia:

I had the joyful experience of meeting three older blokes on to of Skiddaw back in the 90s and being told it was to celebrate one of them turning 80.

All of us ran down the grassy slopes with the birthday lad ahead waving his arms and yelling about life and living!

 graeme jackson 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

At 60 I'm finding it hurts a lot more when I fall off my skateboard - trying not to

In reply to Dax H:

> To give you an idea of how much I'm like mum's side of the family. A photo of my and a photo of my great great grandad Thaddeus. 

I love your cap!

 alan edmonds 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

Maybe emulate Peter Habeler climbing the N. Face of the Eiger aged 75

 colinakmc 08 Dec 2021
In reply to streapadair:

That’s encouraging, Streapadair, I still have unfinished business there! The morning we got up it was totally clagged in and not fit for the onward route to Dufourspitze and Nordend, which had been the plan. Ended up doing old school ML nav in a downpour (rain)  to regain the top station of the cable car below the Gnifetti.

 Tom Valentine 08 Dec 2021
In reply to colinakmc:

Well I hope Earlgreytea has had his morale boosted by all this advice which is mostly glass half full stuff and, who knows, he might care to expand his profile to share some of his successes as UKC has shared theirs for him.

In reply to Fat Bumbly2:

I get the sense a certain decline is inevitable, but I'm vaguely wondering if/hoping that my love of cycling (at 42 in March) for a lot of my life, might mean that my finally getting around to learning to navigate and explore hills and mountains, can carry on until an age at which I might have already worn my joints out had I started earlier.

It's been my 'go to' for headspace and nature, while I've untangled my head, now seem to be in the right place for going out and adventuring.

 alan moore 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

> with the caption "JR and AS (with a combined age of over 150) climbing ENRD" 

Last time I climbed with my Dad (Culm, October) we had a combined age of 132!

In reply to alan moore:

That's excellent; you are of course dragging the score downwards by being a mere youth 😁

 RobAJones 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Timmd:

> I'm vaguely wondering if/hoping that my love of cycling (at 42 in March) for a lot of my life, might mean that my finally getting around to learning to navigate and explore hills and mountains, can carry on until an age at which I might have already worn my joints out had I started earlier.

I was going to flippantly going to reply to the OP that getting down rather than up tends to be the problem, as you get older. So, if they took up base jumping or paragliding it might enable them to compete more North faces, or they could get better and attempt routes that require an abseil rather than scrambling descent. Similar to you, I"ve gone down the route of longer days being  spent sitting down either on a bike or in a kayak and rationing my long mountain days. 

OP Earlgreytea 08 Dec 2021
In reply to RobAJones:

Lots of routes on mont blanc massive and aguille de midi. Five full seasons skiing, eventually with a serious off piste accident ending it all. Two broken legs. Scar tissue on shoulder blades from Rock climbing, shoulder problems, back problems and neck problems from 3 motorcycle accidents..... Rheumatism in both knees. Currently can walk a maximum of two miles . 50 feels old....

 Lankyman 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

> Lots of routes on mont blanc massive and aguille de midi. Five full seasons skiing, eventually with a serious off piste accident ending it all. Two broken legs. Scar tissue on shoulder blades from Rock climbing, shoulder problems, back problems and neck problems from 3 motorcycle accidents..... Rheumatism in both knees. Currently can walk a maximum of two miles . 50 feels old....

Have you considered talking to your programmer?

In reply to Earlgreytea:

You might take to cycling, or be able to do it in a rewarding way that is. I'm sure I remember absorbing some information about it being good for rheumatic knees.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

https://creakyjoints.org/diet-exercise/cycling-and-arthritis/

The first reasonable looking thing on google says this about it and cycling.

In reply to RobAJones:

Somebody who used to post on here (they still might under a different name), spoke at length about being 'fit for life', in keeping one's body in a workable condition even if below it's maximum capacity to be fit, compared to friends who had become supremely fit and done Iron Mans and similar, and then developed injuries. I think it lodged in the back of my mind, partly having health check ups due to my diabetes, and needing to think about being well for my lifetime in keeping it well managed.

I guess being as fit as possible won't always result in injuries and/or overuse issues, but a holistic approach can't be a bad thing in the end...

In reply to RobAJones:

I guess nobody really goes out to have adventures with that kind of thing in mind though.

In reply to JohnnyMac:

> It’s easy to lose fitness and harder to recover from injury but met plenty 70+ in the huts still having proper adventures

> Hear that not stopping is the key to continuing.

I wonder how much of this is down to positive mental attitude, as well as physical fitness?

I'm 55, reasonably fit with a few niggles, but finding it increasingly difficult to move my arse off the sofa to get out running, cycling or walking.

Just can't seem to motivate myself at all, it just seems another chore I have to do.

 Forest Dump 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

We've all got a quota, you've used yours up early..

You'd now probably meet the clinical criteria for fibromylagia/cfs

Doesn't need to be a show stopper, just be proactive in looking after yourself and re-calibrate your definition of adventure

If you've done half the things you've claimed to your probably still fitter than 80% of the UK population

In reply to Ridge:

I'm seemingly younger than everybody else on this thread, so can't speak from experience, but I read an article in New Scientist which said that 2 twins could have the same genetics, and that how they both thought about ageing (and having energy I dare say) would make a difference between them in the long term in how they both aged.

Winter weather isn't the most inviting of weather to be active in, I only cycled in the rain today because I had to go to uni.

In reply to Ridge:

My quirky nephew used to sometimes say 'Nope!' and run away from his mum's female friends when they wanted to smother him in hugs, so I now think 'Nope! to myself whenever there's an alternative to something being down to ageing. A toddler running away from the idea of ageing seems like a helpful mental image.

 Tom Valentine 08 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Impressive. But what have you done on you know what. ?

In reply to Ridge:

> Just can't seem to motivate myself at all, it just seems another chore I have to do.

I guess you know your choice of words are very telling?

I'm two years older than you, and I do struggle to get out the door occassionally, but I don't ever think of exercising as a chore. Sometimes it is something I really want to do, at other times it feels like something I have to do because I know it is good for me physically and mentally and I know I will always feel better afterwards.

In my lifetime I have completed thousands of bouts of exercise and I honestly don't think on completion, I have ever once thought, "I wish I hadn't gone out". There have been plenty of times I've thought about going out, not bothered and know I would have felt better if I had gone.

We are all different, but what would motivate you to exercise?

Want to feel better physically and mentally? That is pretty much guaranteed if you find the right exercise for you and have the right approach to it.

The social aspect? If so join a club, or arrange to exercise with a friend.

Exploring and being out in nature? find some local walks/runs/bike rides through nice countryside. Or plan some weekends away or holidays that you need to be fit for to get the most out of them.

The competition? even just with yourself? Get yourself a garmin watch, get yourself on strava. Or enter an event that you would need to get fit for and tell your friends you have entered.

The vanity? impress family and friends that you can still run 10k's/half marathons or further in your mid fifties?

Like feeling smug? Be able to come on UKC and preach?

Probably all the above apply to me to some extent. 

In reply to Ridge:

Try orienteering, physical and mental workout at the same time. Somehow stupidly satisfying 😁

In reply to mountain.martin:

> I guess you know your choice of words are very telling?

Yes, but it has become a chore

> I'm two years older than you, and I do struggle to get out the door occassionally, but I don't ever think of exercising as a chore. Sometimes it is something I really want to do, at other times it feels like something I have to do because I know it is good for me physically and mentally and I know I will always feel better afterwards.

It's now very much in the 'have to do' category.

> In my lifetime I have completed thousands of bouts of exercise and I honestly don't think on completion, I have ever once thought, "I wish I hadn't gone out". There have been plenty of times I've thought about going out, not bothered and know I would have felt better if I had gone.

Very much not bothered.

> We are all different, but what would motivate you to exercise?

Good question.

> Want to feel better physically and mentally? That is pretty much guaranteed if you find the right exercise for you and have the right approach to it.

This is the prime aim, but for some reason my head isn't in the right place. Got myself pretty fit during the actual lockdown, but have been declining ever since.

> The social aspect? If so join a club, or arrange to exercise with a friend.

Not really a social person, particularly when it comes to exercise. I tend to exercise alone where possible.

> Exploring and being out in nature? find some local walks/runs/bike rides through nice countryside. Or plan some weekends away or holidays that you need to be fit for to get the most out of them.

I think it's the shit weather that's the problem TBH. On an intellectual level I know it's good for me and I'll feel better, but I'm actually dreading heading out of the door into the cold, wind and wet.

> The competition? even just with yourself? Get yourself a garmin watch, get yourself on strava. Or enter an event that you would need to get fit for and tell your friends you have entered.

Got a Garmin, and it just seems to be mapping my decline into old age and infirmity! Not a competitive runner, I'm too slow for that. Also brings back memories of PE at school, and not good ones.

> The vanity? impress family and friends that you can still run 10k's/half marathons or further in your mid fifties?

Not impressive about my fitness TBH

> Like feeling smug? Be able to come on UKC and preach?

That might work! Just can't get into the right frame of mind at the moment for some reason.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

I did no exercise except walking until I was 48, when my then small son wanted to have a go at climbing. A friend took us to the wall, and I thought I was not fit enough or strong enough to do more than try it for a couple of weeks. I was wrong. Then I had to start running to get fit for climbing.

At 59 I am fitter than I have ever been. Never much of a climber but I go to the wall once a week, run 20 miles a week, cycle a bit. Fitness feels like a wonderful gift that I hadn't even known I wanted, and I will not be letting it go without a fight.

In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

> tob a ti si ???

I actually googled this, thinking it was latin

 Lankyman 09 Dec 2021
In reply to Queenie:

> I actually googled this, thinking it was latin

More like Russian in Western script

In reply to Queenie:

> I actually googled this, thinking it was latin

Going to be honest, that actually made me laugh out loud

In reply to Lankyman:

> More like Russian in Western script

I'm far from Russian 

:-D

 nufkin 09 Dec 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

> More like Russian in Western script

I’d assumed it’s all been Polari

 wercat 09 Dec 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

could be Flower Pot men language (original ones)

In reply to Earlgreytea:

> Lots of routes on mont blanc massive and aguille de midi. Five full seasons skiing, eventually with a serious off piste accident ending it all. Two broken legs. Scar tissue on shoulder blades from Rock climbing, shoulder problems, back problems and neck problems from 3 motorcycle accidents..... Rheumatism in both knees. Currently can walk a maximum of two miles . 50 feels old....

Sounds like you should just be grateful your stil upright  breathing and warm.

In reply to Michael Hood:

> Try orienteering, physical and mental workout at the same time. Somehow stupidly satisfying 😁

….. and improves your map reading skills no end.

 RobertHepburn 09 Dec 2021
In reply to Ridge:

I know how hard it is to get the motivation up sometimes, but I have never been out on my bike and thought "I wish I stayed in bed".

I try and stick to the idea that if the weather is ok, and you are not ill, you go. 

It does help that I generally love mountain biking and climbing, so getting fit is a side effect.

Missed a few bike rides recently through lack of energy (I am 53 now!) but got out today in the sunshine at lunchtime and feel much better for it.

Good luck with getting out the door.

Post edited at 17:02
In reply to RobertHepburn:

Well done, and thanks for the advice. Just need to get my arse into gear.

 Tig44 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Rage, rage against the dying of the light

In reply to Earlgreytea:

Cannot comment to OP, as at 61 I don't recognise myself as being at "old age" think more mid age maybe at 81 I will have the criteria required.

In reply to Rog Wilko:

> Sounds like you should just be grateful your stil upright  breathing and warm.

It could be a upright , either that or it's a desktop .

As for warm , electricity does that via resistance .

Breathing I don't think so.

I'm amazed people are replying to the new registered user with no information asking a random question about aging and ability.

The prediction is earlygreytea will return with some fantastic supplement, lifestyle regime and a link to where we can all partake in the rejuvenating effects of said treatment. 

AD

1
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

It's actually, for me anyway, quite an interesting discussion. Who cares if it originated from a bot?

Post edited at 08:47
 deepsoup 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

While it did look a bit fishy the OP was atypical for a 'bot.  Earlgraytea has since returned to the thread and commented elsewhere, has so far refrained from sharing covid/anti-vax conspiracy theories, trying to flog us supplements or recruit us into pyramid selling schemes or and does seem fairly convincingly human.

It's nice to be nice so on the offchance that the OP is indeed human, perhaps we could all put a lid on the 'bot stuff and give them the benefit of the doubt for now?  Just until your prediction turns out to be correct.

In the unlikely event that an actual human did happen to register on here as a genuinely new user, I imagine it would be a bit upsetting.  And for one who hadn't been paying attention to UKC as we've all been losing our collective minds over the last couple of years whilst up to our arses in 'bots and bad-faith posters burning through dozens of sockpuppet accounts, probably quite baffling as well.

In reply to deepsoup:

I had wondered about the OP a couple of days ago, but then re-scrolled down the thread and saw that they'd posted again. That's about as far as my "dodgy posters" detection abilities get to 😁

In reply to deepsoup:

> While it did look a bit fishy the OP was atypical for a 'bot.  Earlgraytea has since returned to the thread and commented elsewhere, has so far refrained from sharing covid/anti-vax conspiracy theories, trying to flog us supplements or recruit us into pyramid selling schemes or and does seem fairly convincingly human.

> It's nice to be nice so on the offchance that the OP is indeed human, perhaps we could all put a lid on the 'bot stuff and give them the benefit of the doubt for now?  Just until your prediction turns out to be correct.

> In the unlikely event that an actual human did happen to register on here as a genuinely new user, I imagine it would be a bit upsetting.  And for one who hadn't been paying attention to UKC as we've all been losing our collective minds over the last couple of years whilst up to our arses in 'bots and bad-faith posters burning through dozens of sockpuppet accounts, probably quite baffling as well.

As you wish . 

I shall refrain .

:-D

 deepsoup 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Archmagos_Dominus:

Cool. 

By all means please do feel free to crow about it if/when you're proved correct though!

 HB1 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

FWIW  in 1997 (aged 50) I managed 42 outdoor solo sessions, 64 climbing sessions and 32 visits to walls (and a shoulder separation)

In 2007 (aged 60) I managed 25 solo sessions, 34 climbing sessions and 26 wall visits (and a broken back)

In 2017 (aged 70) I managed 11 solo, 14 climbings and 26 wall sessions ( and a hip-replacement)

I walk less, run less than I did. I don't expect too much, but I get out when I can. What else can I do?!

In reply to HB1:

Were there other injuries etc along the way or do you only do regular 10 yearly medical interventions 😁

With running, I mope a bit that what used to be an easy jogging speed now requires bucket loads of effort, but I get over that by setting myself a target every year to run faster (on all my "standard" runs) than various previous years.

When I got to 60, I managed to run faster than I had during the whole of my 50's, but that was largely because those were my fattest, unfittest years. Might not manage to be quite that quick again, but hopefully it'll be many years until there are no previous years that I can beat.

OP Earlgreytea 10 Dec 2021
In reply to HB1:

Sometimes, like now for me you have to accept it's time to stop. I'm not Gerry Gore and I've ran out out of determination and will power to continually go through pain barriers. A warm bed is a comfy place to relax. I've done more than most people in my life, in truth they're just adventures and memories, they don't mean much and were good while they lasted. Good friendships are far more important than skiing and adventures. 

Post edited at 10:23
 Offwidth 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Who says HB1 isn't getting the best of both the adventure he can and friendship ??

I certainly won't be giving up the former until absolutely forced to.

In reply to robert-hutton:

> Cannot comment to OP, as at 61 I don't recognise myself as being at "old age" think more mid age maybe at 81 I will have the criteria required.

My Dad used to joke that one of the most important decisions one can make, is when to start middle age, and almost seemed to blink in surprise when he turned 70.

 denis b 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Am just back in the door from a long hill run that I couldn't, and more importantly, didn't do in my 20's, 30's or 40's. At 59 I can do it and I think a lot of that has to do with developing a fuller and more resilient mental self. These days I have to prepare - S&C, treating niggles immediately and structured training with lots of variety. Have always had a burning ambition to run over hills rather than climb and hike them as I have for years. Making it happen has been an interesting experience and a large part of that is embracing where I am at now and just going at it patiently and diligently. Goals are personal but the clock is ticking so I am trying to do what I can do now!

Do enjoy.

 SteveSBlake 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

> Sometimes, like now for me you have to accept it's time to stop. I'm not Gerry Gore and I've ran out out of determination and will power to continually go through pain barriers. A warm bed is a comfy place to relax. I've done more than most people in my life, in truth they're just adventures and memories, they don't mean much and were good while they lasted. Good friendships are far more important than skiing and adventures. 

I think the memories are very important (To me anyway) and I'm determined to keep making them. It's a lot of fun along the way as it involves either a rather cool group of Geezers, or my wife.

If you feel it's time to stop then do so and don't worry about it. You don't have to explain yourseltf to us. Enjoy the mattress.

Steve

 mountainbagger 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Ridge:

> Well done, and thanks for the advice. Just need to get my arse into gear.

Did you get it in gear today Ridge? Let us know!

My own observation, it takes longer and longer to feel comfortable running. Think I'm almost up to 3 miles before I feel "warmed up" and fluid! Before that it's all a bit sluggish, heavy, unnatural etc. I used to just bound out the door all bouncy and fast*. Although, this issue means my runs have to be long so I get to the enjoyable stage 🙂

But I have a desk job. Apparently, according to a book I'm reading, this makes it really hard to move well when running. I've become an expert as sitting down!

Edit: ok, I was never that fast, but I mean relatively! I can still run almost as fast but not every run... just can't handle that any more. Lots of long low HR running works for me.

Post edited at 15:43
In reply to mountainbagger:

Booster jab today (and stubbed my little toe on Tuesday to end up with a purple and yellow foot on Wednesday) so might venture out tomorrow.

A really good point about those heavy, leaden, bounceless first few miles. That is the worst bit, it's like running in diving boots. I too am spending the working day polishing the arse of my trousers, that probably doesn't help.

Think I'll just try and get out tomorrow and jog slowly at a low heart rate and see how it goes.

 petemeads 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Ridge:

Yesterday jogged the 3.5 miles to the physio who is treating my sciatica. Was observed by another client who said "he's not coming for treatment is he?" to which the receptionist replied "He certainly is - that's what we do here!". Had my spine stretched etc then jogged home - slightly faster... Kudos to her!

 wbo2 10 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea: I'm not as old as some around here, but I'm older than you and I don't see a good reason to stop doing stuff yet.  If you want to feel old then sitting on your backside blaming the old days is a fast way to get there, and I've had my share of mileage and injury along the way.

A little bit and often is the way forward I think rather than saving up for a big day that might never come, or a bit disappointing

In reply to Earlgreytea:

> Lots of routes on mont blanc massive and aguille de midi. Five full seasons skiing, eventually with a serious off piste accident ending it all. Two broken legs. Scar tissue on shoulder blades from Rock climbing, shoulder problems, back problems and neck problems from 3 motorcycle accidents..... Rheumatism in both knees. Currently can walk a maximum of two miles . 50 feels old....

What you are describing is suffering from multiple injuries not ageing.

In reply to Earlgreytea:

> Sometimes, like now for me you have to accept it's time to stop. I'm not Gerry Gore and I've ran out out of determination and will power to continually go through pain barriers. A warm bed is a comfy place to relax. I've done more than most people in my life, in truth they're just adventures and memories, they don't mean much and were good while they lasted. Good friendships are far more important than skiing and adventures. 

It's interesting how we can have certain realisations at different (st)ages, after I broke my cycle helmet on the drystone wall at Surprise View at age 24 and was rather concussed (2 weeks and 5 days), I seemed to conclude the same thing about 'the human aspect' coming above everything else. No view has felt as beautiful as at Surprise View, when I sat on the wall and realised my helmet had just saved my life, in the richness of the greens and the beauty of the Peak District. 

Post edited at 20:02
 Bob Bennett 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

I would recommend you go out and buy poles now and not wait until your joint problems get worse. I am a lot older than you but find I can get around fine in the hills but I never go without walking poles

In reply to Deleated bagger:

> These folks should inspire most of us;

I also saw a thing on FB the other day (not sure how to do a link) about a man who started doing the Munros at 80 to raise money for charity. 81 he is now on 199. Incredible; I can't imagine many people would be physically up to this at that age.

Post edited at 10:36

As someone who has recently started to feel my age a bit, I am finding this thread very interesting.

I am 57. Up to 50 I didn't really notice the ageing process apart from feeling the cold a bit more, but I suppose 50 years of hillgoing (around the equivalent of probably 6 Munro rounds), 30 years of obsessive winter climbing, endless rock climbing, 40 years of running and loads of alpine climbing and other stuff is inevitably going to take its toll.

An ongoing Achilles issue made me cut back on my running and now I am coming to terms with the fact that my running days are probably over (though, with plans to retire imminently, I won't so badly need the quick, after work, training fix of hill running because I'd hope to be out on the hills a lot more). My inability to keep adequately warm winter climbing without so many layers of clothing that I can barely move means that I have all but stopped winter climbing (though I keep telling myself that I am just on a break and that I'll become a fair weather winter climber once I can pick my well rested days when retired. Though maybe I have just gone soft!). In winter, mountain photography has taken the place of climbing but still gives much of the hard work and the discipline of 3am starts.

I have had increasing numbers of shoulder and elbow niggles in my fifties and I really struggled to get back after both lockdowns (stronger fingers than before through finger boarding but my shoulders just didn't like the increase in demand after the long layoffs). But with some physio, regular maintenance and learning to pace myself a bit more, I seem to have got on top of these problems and am getting back towards my best this winter indoors.

But the big one for me is that I have started getting knee issues. I have had two major flare ups keeping me off the hills for a couple of months, but generally I am still able to hill walk but have to be careful not to overdo it and can't just do big, hard days in the hills without worrying any more. Physio to strengthen the knees has helped, but after a recent scan I now know that I am headed towards knee replacements. It is probably just a matter of timing. So, with NHS waiting lists probably at least 5 years (and they would, quite rightly, just laugh if I tried to get on one at the moment when I can still live a very active life by most standards), I need to budget to get them done privately in my retirement plans.

I have also had some lower back issues with referred pain as far as my ankles at times. Nothing crippling, but my physio recommended going to my GP in case something systemic was going on. Blood tests came up negative but there are a lot of false negatives and physio is now recommending I push for a referral with a rheumatologist anyway. With the NHS as it is I'll probably end up going private for this too.

I do quite often think how I shall cope with the inevitable ongoing aging process, when I love the mountains and climbing so much. Of course I shall become slower and needing more recovery from hill days. I shall continue climbing as long as I am able to do so. In my retirement I shall definitely do more sea kayaking. And I am very happy to have, in recent, years  discovered that I can become almost as obsessive about mountain photography as I have been in the past about winter climbing; I can imagine being able to do it, albeit with decreasing amounts of leg work for as long as I live.

 Wainers44 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Interesting thread!

I was a bit of a late starter. Ran first ultra at 50. Have now done maybe 20odd of them. I think I'm 56 now, although the maths get harder as I get older. 

Been really lucky with injuries. No real issues, except my stomach now empties itself out in a very distressing way when I run past 30ish miles. Normally I carry on regardless. 

Won't quite get to 1000 miles run this year, but very close to 100,000ft of height gain in the year so might still get there.

Sickness aside, fully intend to keep going until I just can't. I still seem to be in the "more I run the better I feel" zone. Long may that remain so!

 wercat 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Currently Resting:

could also be an acquired inflammatory thing making everything seem worse than it really is.

Post edited at 12:17
 wercat 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Robert Durran:

my knees and back improved years ago when plantar fasciitis made me want to give up hillwalking and even half an hour on the high street had my knees and back aching - Not suggesting it'll work for you but there was a fantastic secondary improvement over time when I had custom insoles for the plantar fasciitis made on the recommendation of our GP (MRT member, skier, mountaineer)

In reply to Earlgreytea:

I've had a couple of setbacks in the last few years: lost the use of my legs for a week and had five nights in hospital (having never been a patient before), 4xMRI told me what I didn't have (phew!) a neurologist guessed it had been a TIA; I think I hurt my back at the winter wonderland ice rink ,or it could have been chucking myself off at Leeds Wall without warning my belayer. Then I crucified my knee picking up a box of books and thought that was it. And my old climbing ankle (High Neb Buttress, 1983) is a constant worry. And lockdown has encouraged a lot of sitting on my arse, which is probably the worst thing of all. 

But, Pilates, a bit of physio, walking poles and a bit of dieting,  have got me back leading 6b at the wall and I'm getting into rollerskiing (I know). And I'm trying to get the 2000 footers of England done before my 70th birthday (next month). Yesterday I was completely alone high above Cow Green Reservoir in 30mph winds and snow and my chief worry  is to do with getting my permit through for Mickle Fell. I'm learning to love the place I happen to be in at the time and go by my motto: You can always do something.

In reply to mountainbagger:

> Did you get it in gear today Ridge? Let us know!

Managed to get it in gear this afternoon. Just under 6 miles at low HR. Lots of niggly things but got it done. Followed by steak and chips and a couple of beers for tea. Feeling better (if still a bit old and decrepit) 😃

In reply to Ridge:

Some days you will feel old and decrepit; others you will think "I'm so much younger than most other people my age".

The more you manage to do, then the less of the former and more of the latter.

 mountainbagger 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Ridge:

> Managed to get it in gear this afternoon. Just under 6 miles at low HR. Lots of niggly things but got it done. Followed by steak and chips and a couple of beers for tea. Feeling better (if still a bit old and decrepit) 😃

Great work! I haven't run today, and have just had a massive pizza (which was really good), but tomorrow will see me out and about (probably)🤞

Enjoy your evening!

 Billhook 11 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I'm 71 and although I don't summer climb much anymore (who wants a 71 year old climbing partner?)  I do scrambles, mountain ridges and the like in summer & winter I'm quite happy to solo I, II & simple III's.  I still enjoy X-country skiing &  I still walk a lot -I've done the Coat to Coast 3 times in the last 6 years without the slightest issue - I was the guide.  But I've given that up.  I still go up to Scotland every winter into the hills and always on my own.  I still work summer and winter outside as a waller and hedgelayer.

The biggest effect of ageing is I'm slowly becoming more content on doing other things.  I'm cutting down on work and I haven't had any of my canoes out for 3 years now.  Just can't be bothered with the effort.  As for camping and sleeping under the stars?  A nice idea but no longer I think.  I've got a camper instead!!  Comfort beckons !!

But theres still hope into your 80s an beyond.  

A few years ago Mrs P and myself were canoeing in the Thelon in the remote Barren lands of Canada.  We spoke to a Cree indian  hunter  of 90, who still left his summer home for his winter hunting grounds on his own (unless you count his dog team) every year since he was 18.  He wasn't sure how many miles it was each winter & spring, but we probably agreed it was around 250miles each way plus visiting trap lines throughout the winter. .  He walked, jogged and sat on the sledge pulled by his dogs when the going got easy for the dogs!!  Sadly  this was his last trip as the next year he ended up in hospital and died a few years later.

Another trip we did on the Missinaibi River in  Northern Ontario, we met a Cree/Ojibway hunter (Fred Neegan) who was still hunting, fishing, shooting and trapping alone on a 300 +  mile long river with multiple  grade II & III rapids.  He was the best canoeist I've ever seen in action.  He looked like he was making absolutely no effort.  A local who'd sometimes paddled with him told us that even though Fred  was 83 he could still portage his  Nova Craft Prospector  canoe - which weights 80lb and all his own camping/hunting gear - another 50lbs (?) over long portages without a rest.

I guess if you enjoy it and keep doing it..........

 

In reply to wercat:

> Not suggesting it'll work for you but there was a fantastic secondary improvement over time when I had custom insoles for the plantar fasciitis made on the recommendation of our GP (MRT member, skier, mountaineer).

I use insoles which a podiatrist prescribed a few years ago to help with the fact my right foot turns out and I was getting a bony lump on my heel (not custom made). This year a podiatrist looking at my ankles did not think I needed new insoles. Nor has mt knee physio. I wouldn't rule it out though!

 ThunderCat 12 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I lost track of time on Friday night and had problems getting a cab so I decided to walk it. 15 miles. Took me 5 hours. Pretty much all flat along canal paths and I finally got home at 5am.

2 days later and I still feel like I've been run over by a steam roller. Getting old really does creep up on you doesn't it. 

 Bojo 12 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Are you a bot?

In reply to Bojo:

IIRC replicants don't realise that they are.

 ThunderCat 12 Dec 2021
In reply to Bojo:

> Are you a bot?

Bloody bots. Coming over here, stealing the names of our bergamot scented beverages. 

OP Earlgreytea 12 Dec 2021
In reply to Bojo:

No

 Maggot 12 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

Bot or no bot dude, I think the message here is do something,  whatever it is, do something, anything.

I'm a bit clapped out now, so I'm developing an interest in refurbishing stationary engines. I'm having to learn all sorts of stuff, it's great! And physical  (?) Heavy bastards they are
 

 Flinticus 13 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

That's what a bot would say.

 Rob Naylor 13 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea:

I'm 66 and until I injured myself in April this year by refusing to give up on a 48km weighted carry against the clock when my ankle swelled up at 32 km, I was fitter than I've ever been in my life.

It's taken me a good 6 months or rehab to be in a position to do serious stuff and I still have a long way to go to get to a level I was as this time last year, but Saturday I did 19 km of mixed jogging and walking carrying 25lb plus food and water, including several sets of hill reps for a total of about 3600ft of ascent. Yesterday I eased the DOMs by going for a 16 km walk with just waterproofs and warm kit, mainly on flattish ground. I'm a stone heavier than I was a year ago, all put on since April, but it's coming off as I get back into training.

It'll be a while before I'm fit enough to get a good time in the Fan Dance or Paras 10 races, and I'm not yet within sight of the 53 minute 10 ks and 2hr half marathons I was doing last Christmas, but I'm confident that I'll get there. I'm by no means a racing snake, as I'm currently 16 stone and 6ft 1in, and haven't been lighter than 14st 8lb for at least 20 years.

Maybe I've got good genes, but my knees rarely give me issues. Most of mine stem from various injuries to my right ankle over the years, plus the removal of a Haglund's Spur from the same ankle, meaning there are now a couple of screws in my Achilles. 

I train using a graduated programme that mixes up loaded and unloaded carries, runs at various levels (efficiency, progression, etc) and upper body workout, with 5 levels from "Basic" to "Advanced". I'm just moving up from "Basic" to "Basic Plus" now.

I'm one of the older ones in my training group, but there is an 86 year old who still carries the full 35lb on Paras 10 races, and who completed the Commando 30 Miler in 2019 at 84. The main thing we oldies notice is how much longer it takes us to recover from injury than the younger ones, and how much more slowly we have to take the graduated re-training.

 Rob Naylor 13 Dec 2021
In reply to Rob Naylor:

Oh, and Rowland Edwards is still leading multi-pitch E3s at 85 (or is it 86 now?).

 petemeads 13 Dec 2021
In reply to Rob Naylor:

Hi Rob - good to her Rowland is still getting it done! I had a week at PyB in 1974 when he was chief instructor - very enthusiastic and very impressive with a host of absolute classic routes to his name.

You last-year fitness matched mine pretty well, found I could run more often than I thought I should, matched your paces around Xmas then improved to 10k in 50:43 & HM 1:55 in the Spring. To my advantage I am only nine and a half stone, as a leveller I am 5 years older than you. Just getting back to speed/distance after 6 months of sciatica which is currently in remission. Being broken is horrible...

 profitofdoom 13 Dec 2021
In reply to Michael Hood:

> IIRC replicants don't realise that they are.

I know I'm a bot. I'm an advanced model. Not like those pathetic 2019-2020 models

Beeeeeeeeeep. Exit

PS wot's the best way up Mount Ben Nevis?

Post edited at 13:25
In reply to Wainers44:

> Won't quite get to 1000 miles run this year, but very close to 100,000ft of height gain in the year so might still get there.

If it matters to you, with all that ascent and descent you have probably done your 1000 miles. Don’t forget actual distance covered and map distance are only the same on flat ground.

 kevin stephens 14 Dec 2021
In reply to Earlgreytea: In my 60s, can’t climb or hill walk quite as hard as I used to, although I still enjoy them. I enjoy new sorts I can still get better at like sea kayaking , ski touring etc

 wbo2 14 Dec 2021
In reply to Robert Durran: 2 suggestions is that I wouldn't have someone for my knees, someone for my achilles as the former is likely a product of the problems with the other.

Suggestion 2 is that if I had a bones spur causing plantar problems I'd get the bone spur removed.  two weeks of inconvenience after a minor op seems a lot better than the large amounts of faffing around with stretching, painkiller/anti inflam injections, custom insoles and constant niggling injuries judging from the experiences of people I know.

OP - yoga - small amounts and daily to sort out various ailments , and then back to it.  50 and a little bit is not old


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