UKC

/ Pay as you go

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DenzelLN - on 10 Apr 2018

Contracts up, and im thinking of cancelling in order to change my number and put an end to the countless daily marketing phone calls.

Im wondering as the phone (iPhone 6) itself is ok should i just get a pay monthly or pay as you go sim until the phone itself is knackered? How much is pay as you go likely to cost these days with average data usage?

 

andyman666999 - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

I pay 7.50/month for unlimited texts and 1gb data with giff gaff. Their tariffs are great and they’re a good company. Highly recommend 

DenzelLN - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to andyman666999:

Just the advice i was looking for, cheers.

Anyone know if my current iPhone 6 is likely to last much longer? Seems ok, sometimes slow but otherwise fine?

gethin_allen on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

If you use more data then we recently gave me a 4gb data + everything unlimited for £9 a month on a 1yr SIM only contract

captain paranoia - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to andyman666999:

Depends how much you use your phone. I'm with Three's 3-2-1 SIM; 3p/min, 2p/text, 1p/MB

climber34neil - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

Don't forget apple have been in the news recently for deliberately slowing older iphones . Personally I would get rid of it and buy a Wiley fox swift 2 and a sim only contract 

1
Andy Chubb - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

Cost aside, have you registered your number with the ‘Telephone Preference Service’? This is a way of unsubscribing from unsolicited calls and I believe is legally enforced (though not always obeyed.) You can also block calls on an iPhone from any persistent unwelcome callers.

Ianto Bach - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

iD mobile works for me, £7.50 per month for 500 minutes, 5000 texts and 4gb of data, rolling 30 day contract. Their SIM is multi-format and will work in your iPhone (assuming it is not locked). Your iPhone 6 should last a while longer yet...

Ben Sharp - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

>  How much is pay as you go likely to cost these days with average data usage?

Average data usage is about 1-2gb/month but that figure is rising pretty fast as more people are using 3/4g in place of traditional broadband. I guess it depends how much you personally use. The old adage used to be if you spend less than £10 per month then go payg if not go contract. Mine is £9/m contract, don't use data often as I live in the country but it doesn't take long to reach my limit if I'm traveling. Phones only 5yo so happy to keep on the contract for now but from the other posts it sounds like there are better deals out there now.

NathanP - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to climber34neil:

> Don't forget apple have been in the news recently for deliberately slowing older iphones .

That's a bit of a misrepresentation, unless you just don't understand what they were trying to do with power management on phones with tired batteries. 

 

stevieb - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

I got pay monthly for £9 per month with lots of data. Found a Virgin deal but got ee to almost match at retention stage so stayed with them. 

Ive got iPhone 6s. I’m planning to get the battery replaced for £25 to prolong its life but haven’t done anything about it yet. I think you can get the same deal on a 6.

Pawthos on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

I’ve had my iPhone 6 for 3 years - it’s still fine.

captain paranoia - on 10 Apr 2018
In reply to NathanP:

> That's a bit of a misrepresentation

No it isn't. They denied it for years, despite regular accusations of what they were up to.

Battery management vs performance should always have been a user option; provide the facility, publicise it, and let the owner decide.

Their approach to this, and to that of battery replacement, could very well be argued to be aimed at forcing users to upgrade.

1
Blue Straggler - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

As Ianto mentioned - you should factor in whether it is locked to a network and if so, see how much someone would charge you to unlock it. I am a bit out of touch on such things but it might be £40ish maybe. 

I have no comment about the actual question(s) you're posing, sorry!

climber34neil - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to NathanP:

I don't think it is misrepresentation, as Captain paranoia said, they were questioned and denied it, it's got more to do with sales and profit and influencing people to buy the latest apple icrap or whatever the latest phone is than any concerns they may have for the software that people are using.

1
climber34neil - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

I'm sure it is , there must be a huge number of people who " have to have the latest model " this could well be seen as trying to influence it

summo on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to NathanP:

> That's a bit of a misrepresentation, unless you just don't understand what they were trying to do with power management on phones with tired batteries. 

Slowing a phone down so people get fed up and replace it, rather than simply replacing the battery isn't really a misrepresentation.

robert-hutton on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

With Virgin, unlimited calls and text and 12 GB data (4g) - £12.00 per month

Post edited at 08:03
Mikkel - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Network have to give you an unlock code and dont think they can charge you if out of contract.

The days of having to go to a dodgy store to have it done is over.

Yanis Nayu - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

Just get a new monthly contract. I pay about £14 per month for my iPhone now it’s past its 2 year contract period. 

LastBoyScout on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to DenzelLN:

I've always gone for a new phone on a contract, used it until the contract ends, switched to SIM only deal until the phone dies and then start again, carrying on with the same number.

Currently on O2 SIM only, £13pcm, which was discounted at the time from £17pcm. That put it only £2pcm over the bare minimum that I could have got away with and left a bit of slack in case I left the data on. Still less than half what I was paying.

Put your details into bill monitor and it will tell you which is the best deal for you - https://www.billmonitor.com/

Post edited at 11:54
Blue Straggler - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to Mikkel:

> Network have to give you an unlock code and dont think they can charge you if out of contract.

> The days of having to go to a dodgy store to have it done is over.

Ah I didn't know that! Thanks. Explains why the price difference between locked and unlocked used handsets on eBay etc has shrunk.

NathanP - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

No, Apple weren't (and aren't) slowing phones all the time to give a worse user experience with the objective of forcing an upgrade as was claimed and denied. As the phone batteries aged, there was a problem that, at peak processor load, they would suddenly shut down because the battery could no-longer deliver the required power. 

Apple's response was to introduce a change to the power management software so that as the battery deteriorated it would limit the maximum processor load rather than have these crashes - most of the time the processor is nowhere near max so there is no effect. If you replace the battery then you are back to new phone performance. Wicked price-gouging Apple will replace an iPhone 6 battery for £25. 

I absolutely agree that power management v performance should be a user - managed option and transparency is never a bad thing. If Apple had announced a new option (rather than a hidden change) to avoid these crashes and been more transparent they would have avoided  a lot of negative publicity but anybody who chose to keep having sudden crashes rather than replace the battery or accept an occasional throttle back would have to be a bit of in idiot IMO. 

 

captain paranoia - on 11 Apr 2018
In reply to NathanP:

> If Apple had announced a new option (rather than a hidden change) to avoid these crashes and been more transparent they would have avoided  a lot of negative publicity

Couldn't agree more. I have no idea why they persisted in denying they had made any changes to processor speed. Possibly because they thought it was a design flaw that the battery ESR could increase to a level that would prevent it supplying sufficient current to power the processor. Or maybe trying too hard to maintain the 'Apple: It Just Works' image, perhaps? Rather than 'Apple: It Will Start Crashing After 12 Months'.

> Wicked price-gouging Apple will replace an iPhone 6 battery for £25.

That's very reasonable.

But I'm pretty sure it's a change to their previous policy. I note that for 'other eligible models' they charge £79. That's more like the figures I recall people complaining about.


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