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/ Pet insurance advice

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Ian Archer - on 13 May 2018

I have recently taken out let insurance.

 

I did the right thing by disclosing he lost a bit of hair and hurt his leg running a while ago. I expected these to be exempt. 

 

The policy came back excluding back excluding should, neck and pelvic disorders. Any hormone disorders and leg hip and should disorders. Also exempt us skin disorders.

 

I was expecting skin and leg but all the rest?

 

I'm wondering is their any worth in carrying it on. I understand that skin disorders can be hormonal etc. But all hormonal? And anything anywhere on the body in connection with skeletal etc..

Anyone in vet circles out there to give their opinion?

 

Thanks

 

SouthernSteve on 13 May 2018
In reply to Ian Archer:

Speak to your vet. They should be able to give you an idea whether, based on the history, the exclusions are legitimate and also typical of the company involved. Some companies are very harsh in their initial exclusions, but will respond to reasonable discussion. Occasionally, insurance companies will remove the exclusions for a mild disease after a period of being problem free.

No one on here is going to be able to help with the specifics. 

Tall Clare - on 13 May 2018
In reply to SouthernSteve:

This. We recently moved from MoreThan to PetPlan and had various slightly draconian-sounding exclusions put on our dog's policy, because of a shoulder operation she had as a youngster four years ago - but they say these can be renegotiated/removed after six months of the policy running, following a vet consultation. So I agree - talk to your vet first.

Frank the Husky - on 14 May 2018
In reply to Ian Archer:

I'm not a vet but I have had dealings with a number of pet insurance companies. They are all borderline dishonest. If I were to get insurance again it would be after the company was able to tell me in advance what the exclusions would be, but primarily it would be for accidents rather than illness.

These companies do not repsond to reasonable discussion unless it is in their favour.

Insurance companies will not listen to even the most knowledgeable vets if doing so is likely to expose them to further risk.

Good luck.

summo on 14 May 2018
In reply to Ian Archer:

I'm working on the theory that if I have dogs my whole life and no insurance then I'll be in profit. I might get a painful bill occasionally but overall it will balance out in my favour. But I don't go for breeds that are traditionally highly bred etc.. So I'm stacking the odds in my favour a little too. 

jkarran - on 14 May 2018
In reply to Ian Archer:

> The policy came back excluding back excluding should, neck and pelvic disorders. Any hormone disorders and leg hip and should disorders. Also exempt us skin disorders.

Doesn't cover much but accidental injury does it? Pretty annoying. I'd consider cancelling and reapplying to another provider, perhaps in a slightly more forgetful moment.

jk

jkarran - on 14 May 2018
In reply to summo:

The problem with that for most people is when that big bill comes the cash isn't available, the choice is really expensive unsecured debt or killing a beloved pet who could be saved. A pretty ugly choice.

My colleague had the same self sufficient approach. Turns out her dog has allergies and cancer, he's cost her well into the 10's of thousands at the vet. The next one gets insured day one apparently! It's luck of the draw of course but but you don't tend to save much if you get lucky and if you get unlucky you're left in a right pickle.

jk

summo on 14 May 2018
In reply to jkarran:

Of course there is a risk. But you can pay insurance and still carry some risk that they will refuse to pay out or have to pay a minimum amount yourself first etc.. 

Murfle on 14 May 2018
In reply to Ian Archer:

Disclaimer: Not a vet. 

Pet insurance is generally expensive, the more you pay the more you get. 

Stuff that's useful to have: 

- cover < £5000

- said cover is not ringfenced for specific things, e.g. £500 for blood work, £1000 for imaging, £3000 for surgery etc

- lifetime illness/congenital disease cover, e.g. my dog has a chronic form of meningitis. Expensive initial diagnosis and treatment within the first year was covered. If she relapses now I just pay the excess. Some companies will not pay out in subsequent years for chronic illness.

- reasonable excess. This will vary due to personal circumstances, but the greater the excess the cheaper the premium. 

If your dog is over 5 years old, I would consider opening him/her a bank account where you send a monthly "premium" to be called upon in times of need. The premiums, exclusions and excess tend to jump after this and you might find you're better off (but it is a risk if your dog is accident prone in the first few years).

Hope that helps!

 


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