/ Removing concrete post

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d508934 - on 16 Mar 2017
There's a few concrete fence posts in the middle of our lawn from previous owner, old school and pretty solid, suspect metal rods inside. What's easiest way to remove? Any suggestions??
jkarran - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

I just removed a large concrete post from my back garden. Ultimately I had to dig it loose and lift it out with levers and rope after snapping it off at ground level. The piece in the ground was a good 80cm long and 100+kg with the poured concrete around it.

Starting again (and lacking an excavator to pull it by brute force) I'd try to wobble it loose then sling it around the base and start lifting with a long timber as a lever and wobbling so the soil fills below/around it and gradually jacks it out of the ground. Careful wobbling it, they're heavy when they snap! Might be easier in drier conditions.

You'll probably have to dig it loose.
jk
Mike Stretford - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934: My method was to dig out soil around it, wobble it, pull, swear, repeat. Took ages and gave me the the Nobby Stiles. On reflection the only thing that would really have helped would be and extra pair of hands, or mechanical digger.
Steve Perry - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

If they have steel reinforced bars running through the concrete (most likely), you could hire a hilti chisel and break away all the concrete near to the ground leaving just the steel bar, then use a 9" grinder with a steel cutting disc and cut the bars. Alternatively, if you're feeling energetic, blast them all the way out to their base with the hilti chisel.
1
d508934 - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to Mike Stretford:

Thanks, although sounds harder than I'd hoped. Half thinking of digging down until I get to top of concrete bulb underground then angle grinding it off there, and just leave the concrete bulb there but fill in on top with a few inches soil. Removing the whole concrete thing sounds horrendous!
jimtitt - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

I´ ve removed loads from my property (and still a few to go). None of mine were concreted in but set about 80cm deep. Digging, wobbling and a long lever is the way to go, using a mini-digger helps!
d508934 - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to Steve Perry:

Would an angle grinder not cut the concrete too?

Fredt on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

I would suggest breaking them up in situ as much as possible, then they're easier to dig out and remove a bit at a time.
Toerag - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

> Would an angle grinder not cut the concrete too?

With a diamond disc, yes. Metal and stone/concrete discs are different and not suitable for the wrong material.
Irk the Purist - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

I left the post on, dug a hole and used the post as a lever. Eventually I got it out the ground in one piece and smacked the shit out of it with a big hammer.

HTH
summo on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

If they are substantial, it would be tough work or you could just find a local builder with even a modest sized mini digger?
jkarran - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

Thinking a bit more about it, the easiest way to get mine out whole might have been to dig a hole/slot beside the post, tilt it into the hole then pivot/pull it up out of the ground over a log/fulcrum/roller at the end of the slot using the weight of the long post to counterbalance the concrete slug on the end.
jk
Phil79 - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

Do you need to remove completely, or is area remaining lawn?

If its remaining a lawn, just break concrete out with a hilti (or hammer and chisel) to below ground level and cover over?
thomasadixon - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:
Just removed heaps of concrete from my garden, posts & slab. Found the easiest thing is to break to up and move the pieces rather than trying to do it all in one (and then breaking your back lifting heavy pieces) - just get a heavy sledge hammer!
Post edited at 11:15
ianstevens - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to thomasadixon:

> Just removed heaps of concrete from my garden, posts & slab. Found the easiest thing is to break to up and move the pieces rather than trying to do it all in one (and then breaking your back lifting heavy pieces) - just get a heavy sledge hammer!

Having spent days of my life breaking up a concrete shed base with a sledge hammer, I'd advise hiring some sort of power tool.
thomasadixon - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to ianstevens:
Depends how much you want to spend - I wanted to spend £0. Took me less than 8 hrs overall to remove the slab (2.5m x 4m ish), doing it in chunks after work. Mate who works in demolition recommended it, and lent me the very heavy hammer. Was easier than I thought it'd be...
Post edited at 11:47
ianstevens - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to thomasadixon:

> Depends how much you want to spend - I wanted to spend £0. Took me less than 8 hrs overall to remove the slab (2.5m x 4m ish), doing it in chunks after work. Mate who works in demolition recommended it, and lent me the very heavy hammer. Was easier than I thought it'd be...

My Dad also wanted to spend £0. So he made me do it. It worked fine, but was incredibly tiring and took me far longer than 8 hours, although I was about 14/15 at the time...
thomasadixon - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

Sound like a good plan by him! Good effort as a kid, I was a bit impressed with myself getting it done without it taking forever at 33.
nniff - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to jkarran:
> Thinking a bit more about it, the easiest way to get mine out whole might have been to dig a hole/slot beside the post, tilt it into the hole then pivot/pull it up out of the ground over a log/fulcrum/roller at the end of the slot using the weight of the long post to counterbalance the concrete slug on the end.jk

This.

Keep the length of the post and use it as a lever against the buried part. Once it is out you can contemplate breaking it up. A proper 4 x 4 fence post will help as your fulcrum, being both strong, grippy and cheap. A jumping bar/6 foot straight crow bar will help get things moving if necessary and help in digging. Effort in digging the hole will be repaid many times over - make sure it is big enough to give the concrete somewhere to which it can move. Your jumping bar will also be useful for supporting the post foundation once you've levered it out of the hole.

Now, if I can just find the idiot who bent my six foot bar.......
Post edited at 15:58
sg - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to nniff:

Pickaxe almost certain to be a help.
Steve Clark - on 16 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

http://smithshire.com/products/fence-post-puller-4000kg/

It's good, but it doesn't work if the gravel boards are embedded in concrete and can't easily be removed first.
Steve Perry - on 17 Mar 2017
In reply to d508934:

You'd need different discs for concrete and steel

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