/ Scarpas.shop 70% off is it a scam?

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Got a job rob - on 09 Mar 2019

Has anyone used www.scarpas.shop? They have a 70% off sale. But I have never heard of them.

wilkie14c - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

that page doesn’t even have a contact us link and they are still advertising black friday!

Id try the scarpa shop rather than the scarpas shop

Post edited at 20:00
kaiser - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

Scarper

Jack B on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

Looks as bent as a nine bob note to me.

At the bottom it says "Copyright (c) 2019 SCARPA - Official Online Store", but it fairly obviously isn't the official Scarpa site. Scarpa have a whole bunch of sites for different countries which all look like https://www.scarpa.co.uk/. It's at scarpas.shop because scarpa.shop was already taken by a redirect to the real thing.

There's no evidence who's behind the site. No (real) company name, no address. The "follow us" links at the bottom do not lead to anyone you can follow. The website was registered two days ago, probably by someone in panama.

And of course the prices are just too good to be true. If you try to buy something, I doubt you'll get your boots, and I expect you'll get a few unexpected extra transactions on your card.

Post edited at 20:20
Got a job rob - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to all: thanks, I am avoiding.

idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

Also the Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.... just go to Twitter and Facebook.....

I'm tempted to see how far (using made up detials) I can get.

Pete Pozman - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

Notice there's no Mantas or SLs... 

In reply to Got a job rob:

The domain is only 5 days old and registered in Panama. How did you even find it?

Alpenglow - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Got a job rob:

The old adage holds true.

If its too good to be true, it probably is...

henwardian - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Paul Phillips - UKC and UKH:

I'm guessing he created it and is using a combination of reverse psychology and clickbait to funnel UKC users there :D

In reply to henwardian:

> I'm guessing he created it and is using a combination of reverse psychology and clickbait to funnel UKC users there :D

It's not actually linked and Rob's been a UKC user since 2006. I think this is very unlikely.

I'll let Scarpa know so they can issue a takedown request.

Post edited at 09:05
WVRox - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Paul Phillips - UKC and UKH:

The ad came up on my FB newsfeed. Wanted to take payment in Singapore dollars. Bailed at that point!

Kas - on 11 Mar 2019

I am silly enough and I have purchased a pair of boots from this website. I realised my mistake as soon as I made my payment (too late!). I blocked my card but I am worried I shared my personal data. Can anyone advise what I should do? I reported them to Scarpa an my bank . I am annoyed the add still appears on Facebook. Is there any way of taking it down so no more gullible people are scammed? 

Luke90 on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Kas:

There's normally an option on Facebook to report dodgy ads. Might be worth doing that as well.

If you're worried about the fact they've got your data, it might be worth keeping an eye on your credit report for a while to make sure you don't see anything appear on there that wasn't you.

henwardian - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to Paul Phillips - UKC and UKH:

> It's not actually linked and Rob's been a UKC user since 2006. I think this is very unlikely.

Yeah, I wasn't being serious. That that was the first place my brain went on reading the post probably speaks volumes about my underlying cynicism!

The best solution to this kind of thing is to never every click on an ad, and better yet, get an add blocker so you don't even get the opportunity to do so. Sadly the days of free addblockers that work perfectly are gone because they all got bought up by people who wanted their own ads to selectively get through! (which I have to point out is a classic example of the world deserving every bit of my bedrock deep cynicism.) But even so, it's a lot, lot better to use a selective add blocker than none at all.

Luke90 on 12 Mar 2019
In reply to henwardian:

While there's reason to be deeply cynical about the way selective blocking is being implemented in practice, I think it's a more sensible option in principle. I use an addblocker because I can't stand the really obnoxious noisy or intrusive ads and I fear irresponsible ad providers who regularly get caught out and allow malware through. I'm not opposed to the ad-supported model of web development. (I always have UKC whitelisted, for example, because I like what they're providing and don't want to mooch and also because I trust the way their advertising works to not deliver me malware.)

I don't think the days of good addblockers as you describe are gone though. I use uBlock Origin which is free, open source, still developed by the original developer and, as far as I can tell, hasn't been bought out or made any effort to force users into whitelisting any ads. (The distinction between uBlock Origin and uBlock is important.)

henwardian - on 12 Mar 2019
In reply to Luke90:

Yeah, I use Ublock Origin too, also have UKC whitelisted (though I don't know how their revenue is split between advertising and sponsored posts and... other things?). Tbh I was lazy and didn't check to see if Ublock Origin had been bought out yet or not and it was ages ago that I installed it. It works pretty well but there is still stuff that gets through its filter and some pages I go to the content is designed not to work with an blocker so you have to disable it and reload the page and put up with the adds.

Luke90 on 12 Mar 2019
In reply to henwardian:

> It works pretty well but there is still stuff that gets through its filter

The filters are editable. You can change which blacklists you subscribe to or add items manually yourself.


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