/ Sir Philip Green

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charliesdad - on 09 Feb 2019

In light of the new allegations about Sir Philip, and given past revelations about his work at BHS, can anyone suggest suitable punishments for this knight of the realm?

1
balmybaldwin - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to charliesdad:

Orrf with his 'ead

1
alan moore - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to charliesdad:

Hell is very popular just lately. I hear it has special places.

birdie num num - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to alan moore:

F*ck off......I don’t want Sir Philip Green in hell with me...send him elsewhere

alx on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to birdie num num:

> F*ck off......I don’t want Sir Philip Green in hell with me...send him elsewhere

How about Hull? City of Culture

Wanderer100 - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to alx:

> How about Hull? City of Culture

Or even worse, soon to be City of Culture Coventry. Consign him to a after life of hell on the Coventry ring road.

Stichtplate on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to charliesdad:

Can anybody think of any worse punishment than having to go through life being Philip Green?

He's just found out that he'd bought all his pretend friends, his useless daughter is shacked up with a career criminal turned male model, he hasn't got enough money to be able to live in the same country as his wife, he looks like a corpulent toad with a tan and even the people that don't know him think he's scum. 

I can picture him now...reading Maxwell's biography and looking longingly at the drop from the back of his yacht.

Tom V - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Stichtplate:

I have for a long time tried to believe that James May is a bit uncomfortable with some of the Clarksonesque behaviour he has to go along with in his day job; why doesn't he retire to Palin type territory and let this lad take over his job because he seems to tick all the boxes.

3
skog on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to charliesdad:

Without commenting on the allegations, as they should be dealt with in the proper, legal way, it does seem to me that the whole 'knighthood' process could do with having a bit more due dilligence applied.

And probably a bit more jousting. Who doesn't like jousting?

Andy Hardy on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to skog:

Are there any really tricky petards to negotiate? 

deepsoup - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to skog:

> ... it does seem to me that the whole 'knighthood' process could do with having a bit more due dilligence applied.

I should think so.  It was just plain Christopher Chope who blocked the upskirting bill last year, it's Sir Christopher Chope who's back in the news now. 

Between those two events, here's Theresa May being asked why she gave him a knighthood - strong and stable as an anorexic unicyclist on a bouncy castle.

Edit:  Oops, forgot the link:  https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-politics-44514446/upskirting-row-mp-why-did-you-give-chope-a-knighthood

Post edited at 17:58
Wanderer100 - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to deepsoup:

It's pathetic that governments get to bestow honours like confetti on their  influential rich followers and their political friends. Is she the worst Prime minister ever and is this the worst government ever? We live in an age of political pygmies. 

2
Clint86 - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to deepsoup:

Did I miss something or does she just ignore the question?

john arran - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Clint86:

> Did I miss something or does she just ignore the question?

Fish.

Yanis Nayu - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Clint86:

Yes, but she was very clear. 

pneame - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Yanis Nayu:

and stable

GrahamD - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Wanderer100:

> It's pathetic that governments get to bestow honours like confetti on their  influential rich followers and their political friends.

Indeed it is

>Is she the worst Prime minister ever and is this the worst government ever? We live in an age of political pygmies. 

Almost certainly not.  However crap this lot are I'm sure there have been considerably worse in the last thousand years 

3
Wanderer100 - on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to GrahamD:

We haven't had prime minister's for 1000 years have we?

Apparently not. Robert Walpole was generally considered to be the first prime minister in 1721 although Benjamin Disraeli was the first to use the title in 1878. 

1
Philip on 09 Feb 2019
In reply to Wanderer100:

He/she said governments, and we've had those for 1000 years.

pasbury on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to deepsoup:

Knights of the realm,

Lords,

Ladies,

Baronets,

Marquises,

Marchionesses,

Barons,

Viscounts,

Order of the British Empire.

What a load of feudal antediluvian bollocks.

Post edited at 00:21
2
Lusk - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to pasbury:

I worked with this bloke for a while, a retarded monkey with major brain trauma could run rings round him

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Herbert,_8th_Earl_of_Carnarvon

1
tom_in_edinburgh - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to deepsoup:

And here is the answer from Wikipedia, she's bribing him same as she bribes the DUP:

"Chope has consistently supported Britain's withdrawal from the European Union.[26] Prior to the 2016 referendum, he announced his support for Brexit.[27] He has supported Leave Means Leave, a Eurosceptic pressure group.[3]"

Andy Gamisou - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to Clint86:

> Did I miss something or does she just ignore the question?

No - she pointed out how he's been "a longstanding member of parliament".  Apparently that's all it takes.  

Anyone else in favour of journalists (if Marr can be described as such) being allowed to punch politicians in the face, hard, when they dodge a reasonable question for (say) the third time?

Clint86 - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to Andy Gamisou:

Thanks for that.

cander - on 10 Feb 2019
In reply to charliesdad:

If it’s anything like the places I’ve worked, he’ll get elevated to the House of Lords and if he keeps up his nefarious activities he’ll end up running the place.


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