UKC

Petzl Shunt - how do you use yours?

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 Morty 23 Sep 2022

What is the primary use for your shunt?


What is the primary use for your shunt?

As a rubbish ascender
5 votes | 0%
Top-rope solo
63 votes | 0%
Backing up abseil
14 votes | 0%
Clipped to that old sling in the shed with all of the other weird lumps of metal that I never use.
23 votes | 0%
Shunting
34 votes | 0%
In ways that Petzl don't recommend...
23 votes | 0%
Attach to harness at climbing walls to show I'm REAL climber
3 votes | 0%
Sold it
8 votes | 0%
A super sketchy bit of kit with at least 2 known failure modes where it can completely detach from the rope. Belongs in the bin along with any fool who recommends it for TRS
11 votes | 0%
As a clip stick
1 vote | 0%
Sex toy
9 votes | 0%
On a separate rope, for hanging drill, hammer, brushes, spanner, crowbar, etc
5 votes | 0%
Spoon
1 vote | 0%
Bottle opener
1 vote | 0%
Don't own one
3 votes | 0%
Take it out of my kit bag. Hurl abuse at it. Replace into kit bag
1 vote | 0%
Currently unused and look new
1 vote | 0%
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 Cheese Monkey 23 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

I use it as a back up on a second line when abseiling carrying out work, and as a primary with a different back up on 2nd line when TR soloing.

In reply to Morty:

The shunt is a popular item as it can do lots of different jobs. However, it doesn't do any of them that well, and there are plenty of better and safer alternatives.

Its a "rubbish ascender" but great if that's all you have. Its great for Top Rope Solo, but not very safe, unless you back it up.

The main things its still good for is your backup line when working on double ropes, as a cheaper alternative to the ASAP.

2
 peppermill 24 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

Rather like to use a shunt if I'm doing multiple long abseils, well worth carrying up the route.

 Mick Ward 24 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

Err... shunting? 

40+ years in. And entirely happy with it, thank you very much. 

Mick 

9
 PaulJepson 24 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

As an exciting primary abseil device. 

 ExiledScot 24 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

It's great at many jobs, if you know its strengths and weaknesses. The same can be said of most devices. If you spend a lot of time on ropes, doing different things in different places you need a variety of devices. 

In reply to Morty:

It's a jack of all trades master of none, if people are aware of the failure modes it's a good bit of kit. You could use it on a safety rope to descend sketchyish ladders (wooden ladders on an old mine's manyway for example).

Being able to use it as safety on descending as well as ascending is a rare quality, apart from the very expensive petzl asap (ASAP can get clogged in muddy environments) and a longevity robustness that you don't get from prussic cord especially if gritty muddy.

In some niche uses it's still invaluable. I wouldn't recommend it for top rope solo as an only device, or for beginners but that doesn't mean it has no uses.

1
 johncook 24 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty: Carefully!

 peppermill 24 Sep 2022
In reply to CantClimbTom:

Yeah kinda reminds me of the bi-annual Gri-Gris are sh*te/deadly/[insert overly dramatic negative words or anecdotes about a tried and tested device]

If you know what you're doing with a shunt and in the right scenario they are a wondrous application of 2 bits of bent metal and a spring

Post edited at 16:39
4
 Pekkie 26 Sep 2022
In reply to Mick Ward:

Pretty much the same. In my younger and more foolish days I used to self line routes with a long sling attached to the shunt so it was like a lead. Works well on slabs but can go disastrously wrong on overhangs, so I've heard. Perfect (for me) for cleaning routes and for back up eg on abseil above the sea - though a bit heavy to carry around. Bill Briggs (now sadly no longer with us) used to shunt everything, and had a useful post on here explaining how he used knots to make it safe. Don't know whether or not the post could be retrieved? This is all probably contrary to the manufacturer's instructions, and if you are a newbie don't try this at home.

2
 Mick Ward 26 Sep 2022
In reply to Pekkie:

Bill was always very analytical in his approach; I suspect he brought an engineer's eye to things. Bumped into him again at Tremadog some years ago and he was happily shunting all sorts of stuff.

I also use knots and have a separate quickdraw from my gear loop into the rope below the shunt. Even if the shunt completely failed, I'd only go a few feet to a knot. Don't like shunting slightly overhanging stuff as, at about 110 degrees, it will slip. Disconcerting, even if you're expecting it. 

Agree, Bill's sadly missed. If he could only do three pullups and I could do twenty-three, then how could he effortlessly manage to burn me off every time? 

A former climbing partner and lifetime friend of my old mate Andy Parkin. Have been reading about Andy - and many others - in Brian Hall's excellent book, High Risk. 

Mick 

3
 Michael Gordon 26 Sep 2022
In reply to Mick Ward:

Re knotting the rope below you, what happens if you want to try and link a whole pitch in a one-er?

> have a separate quickdraw from my gear loop into the rope below the shunt. > 

I'm guessing you mean the belay loop?! But that's an interesting and simple solution, hadn't thought of that.

 Mick Ward 27 Sep 2022
In reply to Michael Gordon:

I don't try to link in one. Accept this can be frustrating. But have this self-imposed rule. I'm so used to redpointing and headpoint (err... used to be used to 'em, am crap these days), I instinctively knew how shunt efforts were likely to translate. But, particularly with solo headpoints, this is crucial so would advise great caution for anyone. 

Sorry - idiot alert - belay loop!! 

I just think the knots are as close as bolts. I have a neck sling attached to the shunt by a krab to pull it up. So it should be close/shouldn't be massively shock loaded. It should bite (unless at about 110 degrees). If it doesn't, I'll land on the knot (which has only happened once and that was entirely my fault). If the shunt doesn't work, the krab from the quickdraw will land on the knot. So I've got three chances, not just one. 

I'm sure some people will pick holes in this and I'm not suggesting it to anyone. For me though, it's acceptable risk. 

Mick 

P.S. I gather there are other good (better?) devices out there too. But the OP specifically asked about shunts.  

1
OP Morty 27 Sep 2022
In reply to Morty:

Thanks all - I've enjoyed the replies. I'm pro-shut, though I am also mini-traxion curious. 


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