UKC

Solo Corvus?

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 rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022

Travelling Uk w non-climber, so brought little (ie virtually no) gear, but ‘got away’ solo for a sunny in-pin and a wet windy foggy fiachaill buttress/afterthought Arete. Now maybe have another day to play, looking for suggested mod solo in Lake District or even closer to London. Thinking Corvus, recognizing its diff not mod, but forecast is dry, and neither in pin nor afterthought Arete gave much pause. 
I’ll be in mountain boots. Would love to borrow/rent a helmet..

 kaiser 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

I wouldn't personally.

Pitch 5 (as described here) felt steep and was a bit of an off-width type thing (or felt it to me but then I hate cracks)

https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/crags/raven_crag_combe_ghyll-761/corvus-6648

Post edited at 16:58
8
 MeMeMe 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Not sure I’d ever really recommend anyone solo a route as such but I soloed this last year and it felt very steady.

I got there really early to avoid climbing above or below anyone else and had walked in, climbed it, had a second breakfast and was walking back down before anyone else arrived.    

1
 DaveHK 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

It's more exposed and more involved than the other routes you have mentioned but it is steady climbing on good holds with no surprises that I can remember.

1
 Offwidth 30 Aug 2022
In reply to DaveHK:

I found the start slabs delicate and the whole route can be greasy for a while after rain. Not one I'd recommend. I'd prefer Needle Ridge which, despite being VD, felt a lot easier solo in approach shoes carrying a rucksack than leading Corvus did with a rope and climbing shoes and a sack at the base.

1
In reply to rsutmoller:

Nobody but yourself can make that decision. Corvus is for many a steady solo, it has a variety of climbing styles and the infamous hand traverse is neither as hard or as exposed as photos and reports may suggest.

I would suggest that you stack the odds in your favour if you choose to go. Wear rock shoes and take a chalk bag, these will give you greater protection than a helmet. The probability of a hand or foot slipping being greater than that of a falling object hitting your head.

2
 ExiledScot 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

If you have to ask, then the answer is don't.

Route isn't vague, but it's not like following a ridge. The traverse unnerves some novices, as does the pitch after, the holds are there, but it's steep and airy. I've led, instructed on, climbed, soloed it... maybe 15-20 times in total, as you're a 'non' climber I'd politely suggest it's beyond your limits. The lakes are full of great scrambles, you can do an enchantment in Langdale on the pikes and have an awesome day. 

3
 top cat 30 Aug 2022
In reply to Presley Whippet:

> Nobody but yourself can make that decision. Corvus is for many a steady solo, it has a variety of climbing styles and the infamous hand traverse is neither as hard or as exposed as photos and reports may suggest.

> I would suggest that you stack the odds in your favour if you choose to go. Wear rock shoes and take a chalk bag, these will give you greater protection than a helmet. The probability of a hand or foot slipping being greater than that of a falling object hitting your head.

Chalk bag?  FFS.....On a mountain diff??

48
In reply to top cat:

Read the context, it is about stacking the odds in the climbers favour.

Pouring scorn doesn't help.

5
 Mick Ward 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Hi,

As someone who taught myself to climb through soloing, I'd respectfully ask you to reconsider. Haven't done Corvus but that probably doesn't affect my argument. If something on it is intimidating or unnerves you and (I quote Exiled Scot above), 'The traverse unnerves some novices, as does the pitch after...' then what are you doing to do? You'll be in a life or death situation. Alternatively, if all goes well, will you be tempted onto another Corvus somewhere else, down the line? And will there be a bullet in that chamber? Or another chamber??

I understand you wanting to have a great experience. But again to quote Exiled Scot, 'The lakes are full of great scrambles, you can do an enchantment in Langdale on the pikes and have an awesome day.' Or just advertise for a competent partner and do something with a rope on. And then learn to climb properly, put the effort in so you can do what you like (roped) in relative safety. 

Soloing is arguably the most psychologically demanding discipline in climbing. Very few people know what soloing as a beginner is like. Some of my very early experiences were terrifying. I wouldn't wish them on anybody. 

Mick 

P.S. Sorry to sound like your granny but I'd like you to be around for many decades to come so you can enjoy hundreds of great routes.  

10
 Pero 30 Aug 2022
In reply to Presley Whippet:

Good call IMO.

I generally pack rock shoes on a grade 3 scramble or above if I'm not familiar with it.

And some I do in rock shoes even when I know them. E.g. Milestone Buttress and Pinnacle Rib scrambles on Tryfan. And the cruxes on Castle Ridge on the Ben.

Post edited at 18:57
2
 The Norris 30 Aug 2022
In reply to ExiledScot:

> If you have to ask, then the answer is don't.

> Route isn't vague, but it's not like following a ridge. The traverse unnerves some novices, as does the pitch after, the holds are there, but it's steep and airy. I've led, instructed on, climbed, soloed it... maybe 15-20 times in total, as you're a 'non' climber I'd politely suggest it's beyond your limits. The lakes are full of great scrambles, you can do an enchantment in Langdale on the pikes and have an awesome day. 

I read the OP as s/he is travelling WITH a non climber, and as such didn't bring much gear, but didn't specify that s/he is a non climber themselves?

OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller: my apologies to those of you who mistakenly got the impression I lacked experience… my abbreviation’w’ =‘with’ , as in, I’m travelling with a non-climber, therefore the trip isn’t about climbing, therefore I’ve not brought shoes, rope, or rack  (otherwise I’d be happy pitching out some HVSs for sure) (I did bring a pocket harness and reverso, snd rented an abseil line for in pin)

I guess I thought my description of in pin and afterthought Arete would assure you all about my comfort with exposure (even in the wet), despite the ambiguity of my opening sentence 

just wanted to know how it compared to what I’d already done this trip  videos look rather straightforward 

OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to The Norris:

bingo

OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to Mick Ward:

See my follow up clarification..

gawd, a few decades? I wish  … past 50 now!

OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to ExiledScot:

Uh ya, not a non-climber…

and no chalk bags or rock shoes at the published grade… unless it’s a huge sandbag..

Post edited at 22:40
2
 henwardian 30 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

I think I climbed Corvus years ago in the wet and thought it was very challenging for the grade. It actually stuck in my memory and it would have been more than a decade ago so it must have made an impression. Based on that I'd say you should be ok if you rock up expecting to solo a severe but would advise against it if you're looking for a mod.

OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to henwardian:

thanks- ya I was willing to do the Cairngorms mod in the wet- from video I recognized almost all the footwork was on horizontal ledges  cervus clearly has some smearing on sloping feet so no intention of soloing if any moisture evident on rock or in sky…

1
OP rsutmoller 30 Aug 2022
In reply to Presley Whippet:

Unless someone above me drops something while I’m making the crux move…

 Cheese Monkey 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

I soloed it when it was fairly wet a few weeks ago. It was good fun but I was glad of rock shoes. Enjoyed Outside Route more as a solo though. Continuing up to Glaramara is nice.

 veteye 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller

I soloed half of it, after reeling in my 60m rope; following my brother abandoning the route and me, when he was seconding, half way up. He scrambled up by some other means. It was about 20 years ago (He isn't much of a climber!).

Post edited at 07:35
1
 ExiledScot 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

> Uh ya, not a non-climber…

> and no chalk bags or rock shoes at the published grade… unless it’s a huge sandbag..

It is no sandbag, but it's not at the bottom of the Diff range either, it's a multi pitch mountain route, pitches 4 and 5 will feel airy more so than the In Pinn. Technically be with as opposed to the novice changes little, as you won't have the means to assist them. I'd still give it a miss. I'd never take a novice soloing on a graded route I'd never done before, sorry for the strong language, but it's stupid, it's how accidents happen (which aren't accidents, they are errors, mistakes).

Langdale, scramble up harrison stickle, down to the tarn and up pavey ark, then across around the side of pike of stickle. Grade2, grade 1+ & grade 3 respectively. You've got options to add in dungeon ghyll, or a diff on tarn crag too. You barely need to walk on grass all day. Don't chase the grade, chase the best mountain experience.

13
 ianstevens 31 Aug 2022
In reply to top cat:

> Chalk bag?  FFS.....On a mountain diff??

Imagine taking something to dry your hands off when you go somewhere which is (probably) a little damp. Absolute madness. 

7
 Mick Ward 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Ah, my apologies. As least you'll have climbing experience to fall back on. Although soloing is... well, soloing. Things can feel different, even from moment to moment. 

I guess I've lived with risk for so long and seen the consequences of so many getting it wrong, that I'm endlessly analysing and have maybe become almost feral about it. 

You must do what feels right for you. Good luck!

Mick 

 Mick Ward 31 Aug 2022
In reply to ExiledScot:

> Don't chase the grade, chase the best mountain experience.

Totally agree. Grades are mere grades. Whereas great days out are wonderful. And they stay with you forever. 

Mick 

 Hardonicus 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

I think these decisions rest mainly with the reversability of the route which depends on both the nature of the route and the ability of the climber.

Corvus is a distant memory for me, but I remember the starting slab pitch streaming with water. Even though Corvus is regarded as a rainy day type of route, I am not convinced down climbing would pleasant in those conditions. Dry route, dry day completely different situation of course.

Post edited at 08:15
In reply to ExiledScot:

They’ve not suggested anywhere that the non-climber will be joining them on the climb. Indeed they ‘got away’ from the non-climber for the other routes they soloed. Sounds like they are just on holiday with a non-climber and want to sneak off for a couple of solos here and there.

Post edited at 08:38
 Michael Gordon 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

> looking for suggested mod solo in Lake District or even closer to London. >

A little disappointed folk haven't come up with suggested alternatives in the Lakes for the OP if they think Corvus unsuitable (not my area I'm afraid).

4
 ExiledScot 31 Aug 2022
In reply to Stuart Williams:

> They’ve not suggested anywhere that the non-climber will be joining them on the climb. Sounds like they are just on holiday with a non-climber and want to sneak off for a couple of solos here and there.

Maybe, then why mention them? 

Why not just say, "I'm an experienced hvs leader is Corvus a reasonable solo, ie no tricks, especially loose, sandbag etc?"

25
 Holdtickler 31 Aug 2022
In reply to Michael Gordon:

I think most people are wisely reluctant to promote or suggest soloing to others especially if they only have very limited knowledge of the person in question's experience and general character. 

In reply to ExiledScot:

Because they were explaining why they hadn’t brought a rack. They explicitly said they “got away” from the non-climber for the other routes. They’ve clarified several times. Regardless of whether you like their turn of phrase, it seems reasonable to just assume that their plan is what they say it is.

 wbo2 31 Aug 2022
In reply to ExiledScot:

> Maybe, then why mention them? 

> Why not just say, "I'm an experienced hvs leader is Corvus a reasonable solo, ie no tricks, especially loose, sandbag etc?"

Conversational purpose. I thought the original post was pretty clear around experience and so on but apparently not.

 ExiledScot 31 Aug 2022
In reply to wbo2:

Clearly it's just me! Either way, if you have to ask the answer is almost certainly no. 

11
OP rsutmoller 31 Aug 2022
In reply to Stuart Williams:

Bingo!

OP rsutmoller 31 Aug 2022
In reply to ExiledScot:

> Clearly it's just me! Either way, if you have to ask the answer is almost certainly no. 

I respectfully disagree 

several here correctly interpreted my op, which I still think is pretty clear 

I agree the answer is certainly ‘no’ only if extra meanings are layered into my op (newbie, and then, not newbie but bringing a non-climber) neither of which should be presumed. 

I think asking for beta in this situation is totally fair, and shouldn’t garner knee-jerk ‘no’. I just want to know: I soloed in pin and afterthought Arete without concern, the latter while wet. I’m asking if cervus while dry is reasonable, in the opinion of people who have climbed all three

cheers
 

Post edited at 10:28
1
 DaveHK 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

>  I think asking for beta in this situation is totally fair, and shouldn’t garner knee-jerk ‘no’. I just want to know: I soloed in pin and afterthought Arete without concern, the latter while wet. I’m asking if cervus while dry is reasonable, in the opinion of people who have climbed all three

This, absolutely this. Get all the info you can by whatever means you can then make your own call.

I'd take rock shoes if i was you though. I wouldn't for the other routes you mentioned but I think Corvus warrants them.

 top cat 31 Aug 2022
In reply to ianstevens:

> Imagine taking something to dry your hands off when you go somewhere which is (probably) a little damp. Absolute madness. 

You are surely not suggesting that chalk will work on a wet/damp crag??  It only works on sweaty fingers.....

Use a bar towel or your pants to dry your hands when wet.

1
In reply to rsutmoller:

> I think asking for beta in this situation is totally fair, and shouldn’t garner knee-jerk ‘no’. I just want to know: I soloed in pin and afterthought Arete without concern, the latter while wet. I’m asking if cervus while dry is reasonable, in the opinion of people who have climbed all three

My tuppence (I've climbed all three both in the dry and in the wet):

Corvus is a grade up from the other two, but no more than that. And dampness, should there be some, probably affects its difficulty a bit more than dampness affects the difficulty of the other two.

Rock shoes, if available, will make Corvus feel significantly easier, in a way that they wouldn't really for the In Pin (I'm assuming you mean the East Ridge, the easiest line) and Afterthought Arete. Those are really (in my opinion) hard scrambles, while Corvus feels much more like an easy rock climb. I appreciate this can be different for different people.

Soloing Corvus in the dry is quite reasonable if (and only if) you're comfortable soloing solid multipitch Diff in the conditions of the day (and, if necessary, reversing it), and you are confident you won't go off-route, and you aren't going to get caught up amongst other parties climbing it. Otherwise, it's a bad idea.

 ExiledScot 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

As i said I've done it many times, first in boots in 90 or 91. I've soloed it in hybrid approach shoes breaking them in before a dash along the ridge, with the exception of td gap, pitch 5 of corvus focused the mind far more than any individual pitch on the ridge. I was happy leading low Es at the time, soloing multipitch routes is as much about the head game, or composure, as climbing ability. 

Corvus imho is a different fish to those other routes you mentioned, it's a bit steeper, arguably top end diff, if you screw up pitch 5 then you're dead as the ledge below isn't guaranteed to catch you. The lower pitches can take a while to dry out after a deluge. 

In reply to top cat:

Bar towels only work if they are stolen. Ones legitimately obtained just don't work as well for some reason

In reply to top cat:

I don’t think chalk has the mental capacity to make judgements about where moisture comes from. Although it is insufficient to deal with properly wet holds when you are better off just accepting that things are wet and making the best of it.

2
In reply to rsutmoller:

I was soloing Corvus a few years ago and caught up with a couple who'd just done the traverse. The woman looked across as I was doing it and said "God, that guy's not wearing a helmet". Quite made my day.

Like one of the earlier posters I used it a lot in my instructing days. My occasional trips down to the Lakes usually involve a sentimental solo of Little Cham and sometimes Corvus. I find the latter more worrying even though it's easier. One or two places where the holds aren't so positive and very polished. I'm not used to polished rock any more, we don't have it in Shetland. I'd be wary of soloing it on sight. Mind you I'd be very wary of soloing Little Cham on sight, not knowing the trick move. Sorry, just an old git rambling on...

 C Witter 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Do what you will. No one here will give you useable advice. It's obviously not a particularly difficult climb and it's very well travelled. I know a friend who climbs E5 who fell off it in the wet, though. Take care and use your own judgement.

5
In reply to Michael Gordon:

'C' Ordinary Route (Summer) (VD) is similar in difficulty to Corvus - although it may have changed slightly due to a large spike going AWOL.

 French Erick 31 Aug 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Don’t solo anything on  The Napes as it’s all polished. It gave me a real sweat coming off it!!! And I was on a roll that day with some outstanding solos dotted about the place while supporting a friend with his BG round.

Edit I meant the climbs on the needle 

Post edited at 21:25
2

Been reading this with interest as had been considering Corvus as a first bigger multipitch lead. Now wondering if anyone has recommendations for any alternatives-? 

Tried Sub Cniefion Rib a few months ago but found it a bit more runout, polished and harder moves than I expected at VD - so now looking for a solid Diff in the Lakes (will be based in Borrowdale), ideally easy moves and good gear to get more practice in.

I'm aware of Middlefell (seconded it in horrendous winds in January) but wondering if there's anything else I should look at. 

Ta all. 

Post edited at 10:06
 DaveHK 01 Sep 2022
In reply to Queen of the Traverse:

> Been reading this with interest as had been considering Corvus as a first bigger multipitch lead. Now wondering if anyone has recommendations for any alternatives-? 

As a wise man once told me, 'don't pay any attention to all the weak chinned fannies on UKC'. Just go do Corvus, provided it's dry you'll be fine. It's definitely easier than SCR.

4
 MeMeMe 01 Sep 2022
In reply to French Erick:

I really liked it!

The polish was really comforting, but I have very fond memories of Almscliff so maybe I'm just weird...

 ExiledScot 01 Sep 2022
In reply to Queen of the Traverse:

> Been reading this with interest as had been considering Corvus as a first bigger multipitch lead. Now wondering if anyone has recommendations for any alternatives-? 

Leading is a different game to solo. Stances are big, pitches not to long, comms reasonable, plenty gear, line is straightforward, even the traverse is easily protectable. The steeper pitch 5 you can put in big bomb proof runners too. 

> Tried Sub Cniefion Rib a few months ago but found it a bit more runout, polished 

It's tough with even a smidgen of damp on it as whilst the friction is adequate, most holds are quite naturally rounded.

Note. If you're going well, outside route on dove nest crag opposite(opposite Ravens that is) is quite a friendly VDiff.

Post edited at 11:29
In reply to ExiledScot:

Good to know it's got good runners, ta. Did SCR in the dry but it seemed to involve standing on top of a very polished, very large flake that was moving rather precariously right above my belayer... 

Ta for that rec; good to know. 

Can't say I'm overly inspired by the other advice about 'weak-chinned fannies', though. 

Post edited at 11:41
 Pero 01 Sep 2022
In reply to Queen of the Traverse

> Can't say I'm overly inspired by the other advice about 'weak-chinned fannies', though. 

That's just an E5 climber whose balls are bigger than his brain.

5
 DaveHK 01 Sep 2022
In reply to Pero:

> In reply to Queen of the Traverse

> That's just an E5 climber whose balls are bigger than his brain.

The E5s were a while ago and my balls have shrunk since then although I'm not convinced my brains have grown.

Seriously though, look at what this thread has done with all it's argy bargy, nay saying and po-facedness. It's put someone off doing an excellent route that's probably well within their abilities. That's crap.

3
 C Witter 01 Sep 2022
In reply to Queen of the Traverse:

A few other good options...

Dow: C Ordinary followed by Giant's Crawl (which take you to a fell summit). Both straightforward with good gear, but excellent.

Grey Crag in Birkness Combe: e.g Harrow Buttress (D)Chockstone Ridge (M) or Slabs Ordinary Route (VD) and possibly others. Oxford and Cambridge Direct (S) is fantastic if your confidence is flowing or you have a more confident partner. Bit of a trek to get to the crag, but beautiful place.

Wallowbarrow: Trinity Slabs (VD) and Wall and Corner (VD) - good stances, short pitches, mostly very good gear, friendly and beautiful crag.

Shepherds: Brown Slabs and Jackdaw Ridge. Pleasant and fun.

Post edited at 14:53
1
In reply to Queen of the Traverse:

I'm also just starting to lead multipitch VDiffs so am following these recommendations with interest!  Would second the recommendations for the two routes at Wallowbarrow mentioned below - my partner and I did those last weekend and really enjoyed them.  

We had a great time on Little Chamonix which would be local to you in Borrowdale - although I found the first pitch there quite run-out and polished.

I would also recommend Route 1 on Upper Scout Crag Scout Crags in Langdale.  Route 2 is the more classic VDiff and a fabulous climb but felt pretty gearless to me at the start of the second pitch (though the climbing is easy, this is also quite exposed).  The other joy of Upper Scout is that much of the crag is climb-able at Diff or VDiff so the risk of going off route is low.

Thank you both. V helpful. I've seconded Little Cham and that's def beyond me (and some VDs at Lower Scout - if Upper is similar, the gear seemed to be slinging about half a daisy..?) but I'll have a look at the Diffs. Cheers. 

 TheGeneralist 01 Sep 2022
In reply to top cat:

> Chalk bag?  FFS.....On a mountain diff??

Meh. I took a chalk bag on the Cuilin ridge and am quite content with my decision. I was alone, and thus expected to solo the Gap, Kings(Collie's?) CHimney and the Inn Pinn.

Seemed like a reasonable trade to use chalk, rockshoes and a haul line instead of gear, lead rope and climbing partner.

Am I a monster?

2
 ExiledScot 01 Sep 2022
In reply to TheGeneralist:

On a solo dash along the ridge I have had an almost dead chalk ball in a plastic bag, just enough to counter my sweaty palms before the climbing pitches, can't say it was essential, but confidence is everything! 

 top cat 01 Sep 2022

On the three occasions I did the Ridge it was pissing down.  We soloed everything and chalk would have just been laughable.  Nay, pathetic.

There are some places where chalk just isn't appropriate. At all. Ever.T

I appreciate that folk like to use this aid and aren't going to change their minds.  Such is the hypocrisy of our ethics!  Oh well.

I think the OP should go and have a crack at Corvus, solo and without the aid (or hinder ance of chalk if wet).  My soloing days are done, but when I was dossing in Sheffield back in the day I used to solo a lot.  I even used chalk on  the  E grades.  Shame on me

18
In reply to Mick Ward:

> Hi,

> As someone who taught myself to climb through soloing, I'd respectfully ask you to reconsider. Haven't done Corvus but that probably doesn't affect my argument. If something on it is intimidating or unnerves you and (I quote Exiled Scot above), 'The traverse unnerves some novices, as does the pitch after...' then what are you doing to do? You'll be in a life or death situation. Alternatively, if all goes well, will you be tempted onto another Corvus somewhere else, down the line? And will there be a bullet in that chamber? Or another chamber??

> I understand you wanting to have a great experience. But again to quote Exiled Scot, 'The lakes are full of great scrambles, you can do an enchantment in Langdale on the pikes and have an awesome day.' Or just advertise for a competent partner and do something with a rope on. And then learn to climb properly, put the effort in so you can do what you like (roped) in relative safety. 

> Soloing is arguably the most psychologically demanding discipline in climbing. Very few people know what soloing as a beginner is like. Some of my very early experiences were terrifying. I wouldn't wish them on anybody. 

> Mick 

> P.S. Sorry to sound like your granny but I'd like you to be around for many decades to come so you can enjoy hundreds of great routes.  

A very wise reply indeed. You're not a granny but a guru.

4
In reply to ExiledScot:

Really? Corvus focusses the mind more than Naismith’s Route? I haven’t done Corvus, but I find that surprising.

jcm

 ExiledScot 02 Sep 2022
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

It's obviously slightly harder and still exposed, but I find it more positive climbing, it could just be the style of climbing or friction.

 DaveHK 02 Sep 2022
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> Really? Corvus focusses the mind more than Naismith’s Route? I haven’t done Corvus, but I find that surprising.

I find it surprising too, Naismith's being steeper, more exposed, with poorer rock and 2 grades harder!

Post edited at 07:46
 Offwidth 02 Sep 2022
In reply to DaveHK:

Solo grades are not lead grades though. I climbed Naismith in approach shoes as part of the traverse. I did it with no fuss in two roped solo pitches as we had a short rope (just long enough for the abseils elsewhere). I know Corvus well and am sure I would have been less happy soloing unroped on Corvus....ie the solo grade is at best about the same in good conditions and maybe it's a tad harder for Corvus.

In reply to top cat:

You sound like a right joy to climb with.

1
 DaveHK 02 Sep 2022
In reply to Offwidth:

Well I was the total opposite, perfectly happy soloing Corvus and glad of a rope on Naismith’s.

Funny old game innit?

Post edited at 09:47
 Offwidth 02 Sep 2022
In reply to DaveHK:

Yep! Different strokes n'all.  As Mick rightly indicates, caution is wise and because we all have our strengths and weaknesses going off other peoples' opinions, where a slip and fall is unthinkable, is not the best idea. I was mainly just trying to point out lead grades are not always the best guides for solo grades. When I started soloing there were even a few grit VS climbs I warmed up on (Mutiny Crack most often, and like that route most have now been downgraded to HS). I was also happier soloing them than most multi-pitch mountain Diffs (Ordinary Route on Idwal Slabs being a friendlier exception).

Post edited at 09:52
 C Witter 02 Sep 2022
In reply to liss:

A few more ideas almost at random


Kettle Crag has some lovely rough, bubbly rock and enjoyable long VD pitches, e.g. Stonechat (VD), Major Slab (VD) and the two Severes once you've done those

A lot of the higher crags will be cold and probably damp soon, but if we get good weather, Gimmer faces the right direction and all the VDiffs are great, though Gimmer Chimney is tough for the grade (depending on whether you enjoy chimneying, it may feel more like severe, possibly hard severe). Main Wall and Ash Tree Slabs are friendly slab climbing with lots of holds and gear.

If you're a Cumbrian or north Lancashire local, you might also enjoy Warton Pinnacle Crag and Warton Upper Crag as we move into the autumn. It's a pretty place and you often get a lot of sunshine up there; the routes are short and friendlyish, so you can play around and try slighly harder things if the fancy takes you. Other short crags in the area, e.g. Fairy Steps and Hutton Roof are worthwhile on shorter colder days; Twistleton, too, is worth the drive out.

Hope that helps!

 Michael Gordon 02 Sep 2022
In reply to DaveHK:

> Well I was the total opposite, perfectly happy soloing Corvus and glad of a rope on Naismith’s.>

While I don't doubt the above, it can be hard to say sometimes as you are climbing the routes with a different mindset (same goes for leading vs seconding). I've certainly soloed stuff then gone back with a rope and been thankful for it.

OP rsutmoller 18 Sep 2022
In reply to rsutmoller:

Thanks all for contributing- as it turned out, I never did get away for another solo day, and am back in Canada. Next time! Maybe I’ll bring a rack and rope, and have a crack at some tougher stuff. The scrambling was very enjoyable in the UK, I must say. Cheers 


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