UKC

/ An Teallach

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Iain Ridgway on 28 Sep 2004
Thinking of heading into Shenavall bothy (sp) on friday night, then doing the 6 munroes of the fisherfield round, and then on sunday heading back out over An Teallach to the car.

Whats the scramble like compared to say the Aonach Eagach? CMD arete? We'll have biggish sacks with us, so it will be a bit more awkward? Is a rope required?

If the weathers not clear though we'll head out and go somewhere else. I only want to to An Teallack in good weather, looks such a classic.

cheers
brimul on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway: Ian a guy i worked with a while ago had done the an teallach traverse and he said he loved it.I took him climbing and let him lead a v.diff and he said he was more scared on the v.diff.He never took a rope and said the exposure was a thrill but there where large hold every where.Maybe someone else who has done it themselves could comment more but thought i'd let you know.

Brimul
brimul on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway: Oh and he said it was slightly harder than Aonach Eagach.

Brimul
Norrie Muir - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:

Dear Roy

It is more of a walk really. Only do it in good weather, for the views, I went there 4 times, before I got the right weather.

Best of luck with the weather.

Norrie

PS The Fisherfield 6 is a great day out in the hills.
Iain Ridgway on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to brimul: Ok may just take a few slings and a rope just in case. Cheers
Iain Ridgway on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Norrie Muir: Yeah Heather monkey was banging on about a while back, be good to get up north finally.
Blackie on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:
Usually the ascent is made from Dundonnell which requires the most awkward section to be downclimbed at the end of the pinnacles, however from Shenavall you will be going up this so it shouldn't be a problem. You can bypass all the difficulties by traversing beneath the pinnacles on the West side but it would be a shame to. Probably on a par with the Aonach Eagach, the views are amazing though, one for a clear day.

Have a great trip.
Iain Ridgway on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Blackie: Cheers, the weathers very unredictable, meant to be a load of low cloud, patches of rain, but clear spells all weekend, so really could have anything.
vscott - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway: you can easily avoid all the tricky sections on the ridge by the path about 20ft below the crest- so wouldn't bother lugging a rope all the way. The scrambling itself is not difficult- did it on way into shenevall with a largeish pack and had no real trouble. Great mountain- enjoy!!
Simon Caldwell - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:
There's one section near the start that's about Mod/Diff if taken direct, but it's usually missed out. Otherwise it's quite easy, somewhere between CMD and Aonach Eagach in difficulty, exposure depends how close to the edge you go.
heather monkey on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:
Ooh! Glad to hear you're planning a trip to some proper hills ;o)
You wont need a rope for An Teallach. Doing the ridge the 'proper' way ie south to north you'll encounter all the 'difficulties' at the start of the ridge & the steps will be up. The Corrag Bhuidhe pinnacles are where you'll find the scrambly stuff & as has been said above there's a 'chicken run' about 20 feet below the crest on the west side. The worst wee step is an exposed move above Constabulary Couloir at the end of the pinnacles (which could be a bit fluttery if it's windy & you have a big sack) & you can bypass this one bit without bypassing all the scrambling. But there's plenty big holds (just not very positive, due to the rounded nature of the sandstone)
Now all you have to do is keep your fingers crossed for the weather - as you say it's a classic hill, with stunning views & therefor deserves to be done when you can see them
DougG - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

Damn, thought this was a thread about beer.

Iain, would second everything HM has said re An Teallach Done it a few times, never tire of it. Fantastic day out.
heather monkey on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to DougG:
> Damn, thought this was a thread about beer.

LOL! You've got a one-track mind! (ps - how was the blonde?)

Although you've raised a very important point - Iain, to round off your weekend perfectly you could do a lot worse than a pint of An Teallach Ale (or the equally good Crofters Pale Ale also from the An Teallach Brewing Company) in the Dundonnell Hotel (also available in the Inchbae Lodge(about 5 miles west of Garve on the road home) if you dont fancy the vibe of Dundonnell) , you'll have earned it after that weekend!
DougG - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

> LOL! You've got a one-track mind! (ps - how was the blonde?)

Nice!

PS - You could get me a reputation with posts like the above. Keep it up!
GrahamD - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:

I found the An Teallach traverse was pretty straightforward with only the odd little rocky step to worry about. I certainly wouldn't have any worries (apart from fitness!) about backpacking.
Iain Ridgway on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey: Yeah we know its along weekend, but we wanted to put in a big weekend before we lose the hour. and we are also noth unemployed so can pull long weekends quite easily.
sandy - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:
Did this a few years ago with a light covering of snow. The only thing I would say to watch out for is loose blocks (probably not a problem at this time of year I think the winter may have caused the problems). I almost pulled off a largish block...... As others have said you probably won't need need a rope....

Great route

Andy
Wil - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:

I did it in June about 3 yrs ago - it snowed (!) before clearing whilst on Sgurr Fiona. Great day out.
Agree with prev' posts re difficulties on ridge.
AG - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway: Brilliant hill. Only did the first munro at the end of march last year... tried to do it via a a gully climb (loads of easy gullies there) but there had been too much snow over the previous week. Went back again the next day but the weather closed in at the first munro. Probably one of the finest mountains in Scotland.
colski on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:

I've done it solo with a HUGE pack on my back (un-nerving), also did it a couple of months ago with a daysack (much more pleasant). If you stick to the ridge proper all the way it'll be much more of a challenge, similar to the Aonach Eagach, but not as hard in my opinion.

I dropped off the back down to Shenaval as well, I advise you to look for the lowest bealach to drop off, as I chose a slightly higher point and skited a lot of the way down on my arse.
DougG - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to colski:

You mean 'you peformed a controlled sitting glissade'?
colski on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to DougG:

Aye. Fastest haemmorhoid removal system known to man.
Jamie B - on 28 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

> You wont need a rope for An Teallach.

Bit of a sweeping statment that. What if it's blowing a gale and his partner's bricking it? Easily dealt with if you have a lightweight confidence rope.

> The worst wee step is an exposed move above Constabulary Couloir at the end of the pinnacles (which could be a bit fluttery if it's windy & you have a big sack)

I'll say. There were three fatalities in two seperate incidents here a few years back.

Taken direct, I would definately suggest that An Teallach is a tangible step up from the Aonach Eagach.

JAMIE B>
heather monkey on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Jamie B.:
>
> Bit of a sweeping statment that. What if it's blowing a gale and his partner's bricking it? Easily dealt with if you have a lightweight confidence rope.
>
Umm, no it wasnt a sweeping statement, it was a specific statement in response to a query from a specific poster taking into account what I understand to be his (& his girlfriend's) experience & ability. The statement was also made bearing in mind that in his OP Iain had said he didnt want to do the hill in bad weather & in my reply I pointed out the 'chicken runs' incase it turned windy while they were up there. In my opinion Iain wont need a rope & that's the statement I made. I wouldnt tell my friends who think a pleasant saturday morning is a run over An Teallach to take a rope, but by the same token I would definitely advise someone taking a novice scrambler or child over An Teallach to carry a rope & a couple of slings. This is because I think it's important to provide suitable advice tailored to the person asking & not make sweeping statements!
>
> There were three fatalities in two seperate incidents here a few years back.
>
True and there was also an accident which resulted in a very serious head injury later that same summer (1999) However, before this the last fatal accident at the Corrag Bhuidhe was over 30 years previous, during the 60's. And since 1999 there hasnt been a serious or fatal accident at the pinnacles. <HM touches wood> So what point are you trying to make with that statement?
scawf vu on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey: If the "chicken run" is anything like the path on Am Fasarinen on Liathach you're better going along the buttress tops. I found this much more un-nerving than than scrambling, never again!
Agree with all previous posters re good weather!
Norrie Muir - on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

Dear heather

Get off your high horse. You have to give Jamie some leeway, as a professional outdoor person, well he works in the Ice Factor, he has to be cautious.

Norrie

PS He must have missed my comment about it being a sort of walk. The next time I do the ridge I will take my hands out my pockets to keep Jamie happy.
Not Fozzz on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

>However, before this the last fatal accident at the Corrag Bhuidhe was over 30 years previous, during the 60's.

Are you sure?? I seem to remember a reported fatility on the ridge the day before I was on it and that was the summer of '92??

Bit of a shame I've only been on AT once (mental note to return)
heather monkey on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Norrie Muir:
> (In reply to heather monkey)
>
> Dear heather
>
> Get off your high horse.

:op

> You have to give Jamie some leeway, as a professional outdoor person, well he works in the Ice Factor, he has to be cautious.

I probably have a greater vested interest in the safety of people on An Teallach than Jamie does!
>
> PS He must have missed my comment about it being a sort of walk. The next time I do the ridge I will take my hands out my pockets to keep Jamie happy.

I was tempted to point this out to him, but didnt want to drag you into it (how considerate of me?) I reckon he must be scared of you, but thinks he can pick on a wee Heather Monkey!
heather monkey on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Not Fozzz:
> I seem to remember a reported fatility on the ridge the day before I was on it and that was the summer of '92??
>
Quite possibly, but it wasnt on the Corrag Bhuidhe section of ridge, which was the area I was referring to - Definitely!

Not Fozzz on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

???

Top marks for effort/style if they manged to navigate CB and then lob spontaneously off one of the easy bits!
Norbert on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:

A.T. is easier scrambling than the A.E. but harder than the CMD.

It is also a very long day out if you do the full round from the road.

At this time of year (i.e. windy) and with full packs, the biggest problem will be simply getting knackered. All the hard bits on CB can be avoided if the wind is too strong. I wouldn't think a rope necessary.

<YMMV!>
Iain Forrest on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway:
It's been said already, but I can't see you needing a rope(unless the ridge is in winter nick, in which case please let me know!) It's a walk with the odd bit of scrambling on it; the buttress taken direct is about Diff for a short way but easily avoided on its east side.
I don't honestly know the details but I have heard that several of the accidents on this hill have happened when people have avoided the crest of the ridge by going onto wee slippy ledges, then slipped - as unfortunately seems to happen sometimes on Torridonian-type hills.
Iain Forrest on 29 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Forrest:
That should read 'easily avoided on the west side' of course. Unless you can fly. Duh.
I think I'll apply for a job writing for Trail.
BrianT - on 30 Sep 2004
In reply to Iain Ridgway: I did it in winter with a sprained knee and carrying two sets of climbing gear and an 11mm rope. Found it fine. Easier than Aonach Eagach, harder than CMD. Brilliant.
Jamie B - on 01 Oct 2004
In reply to heather monkey:

> I probably have a greater vested interest in the safety of people on An Teallach than Jamie does!

No vested interest, just a generalised one in safety and good practice...

> I reckon he must be scared of you, but thinks he can pick on a wee Heather Monkey!

Not scared of Norrie, but very respectful of his track record. Hope I get to meet him one day. And no intention of picking on you, just in trying to add to the OP's understanding.

I personaly think that there is too much of a phobia amongst a number of people with regard to packing a rope. It doesn't neccessarily mean that you're going to use it, just that you're giving yourself the option if things don't go as forecast. Think of it as emergency equipment, like your first aid kit. A modern confidence rope (say 25m x 7mm) weighs very little, and can be usefully employed with the minimum of additional hardwear, or even none at all. Useful for other things like improvised carries, as a friend of mine found out a few years ago.

JAMIE B>

Lightweight - on 01 Oct 2004
In reply to Jamie B.:


You can also use the rope, if you unpick the strands, to make snares or an archery bow if you get really stuck and need food. Or to lash logs using square hitches if you need a raft in the event of a flash flood.

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