UKC

/ Crack gloves at Stanage!

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richy85 - on 21 Jan 2017
Me and my friends were climbing at Stanage Popular when I noticed a man wearing crack gloves (hardened rubber wrist gloves). He was racking up and about to lead Robin Hood Right Hand Buttress Direct (which is a weak route in itself). I started up Inverted-V at the same time as the American crack glove guy and reached the top at the same time. At the top he asked me "were is the fixed protection?" I laughed in his face and told him "you're on the Grit now mate. "

So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?

85
Lemony - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

This anedote would make more sense if american crack climbs mostly had fixed protection.
Timmd on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:
I'm sure you improved his day.

;-)
Post edited at 20:54
deacondeacon - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:



> So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit
No, they're illegal. Did you get his number Plate?

and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?
Yep. It'll be vdiff now. I'd email the crag moderator this evening so that he can change the logbooks before anyone climbs it tomorrow.

2
Mark Collins - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?

I imagine the majority will say no. I wear them as I don't care what the majority think and like to keep my days out as pleasant as possible.
buxtoncoffeelover - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

Are rock shoes, cams, nuts, hexes, kernmantel ropes, harnesses allowed? All are new developments since climbing on the grit began.
What qualifies anyone to judge or laugh in someone's face?
Your spelling & grammar leave something to be desired.
Robin Hood'sRight Hand Buttress Direct may be a grade easier than Inverted V, but it isn't a 'weak' route - it is a strong/prominent feature of the buttress.
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

What is a 'weak route' ?
dinodinosaur - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to Mark Collins:

You sir are weak...
7
john arran - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

> What is a 'weak route' ?

It's a bit like a weak thread but has far more value as you don't need to live under a bridge to appreciate it.
Tom Last - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

None of this really happened, did it.
kez1 - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to Tom Last:

> None of this really happened, did it.

I was there and can attest that it did happen and was hilarious, it remains a running joke between the people who were there

25
webbo - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:
It's probably more acceptable than multiple top rope ascents of an E3 before leading it.
John W - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

In reply, did he laugh in your face and say "you, sir, are a complete cock"?

Just wondering, JW
deacondeacon - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:



> So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?
No, but headpointing E3s at The Roaches does lol

Mick Ward - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> ...and about to lead Robin Hood Right Hand Buttress Direct (which is a weak route in itself).

Eh? Soloed with joy so many times.

Always loved the alternative name - Button Hook. Conjured up images of Edwardian ladies...

Mick



Webster - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to Lemony:

> This anedote would make more sense if american crack climbs mostly had fixed protection

nearly all American routes regardless of style (except remote mountain routes) have chain anchors at the top, and often bolt belays throughout if they are multi-pitch, so the OPs post makes perfect sense and is suitably hilarious!
.

8
TobyA on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> at the same time as the American crack glove guy and reached the top at the same time.

So he had the OR ones then? Because the two types available are both Czech not American.
dinodinosaur - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to TobyA:

I believe the guy was American and not the gloves
TobyA on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to dinodinosaur:

I presumed he was a figment of the OP's imagination, in which case both he and his gloves could have been American! But that's why I thought the OP was troll - everyone knows Americans only tape up. It's only Euros who buy the Czech crack gloves - they are really common in the Nordic countries for example!
Jimbo C - on 21 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit

Of course. They are not damaging the rock.

> and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?

Possibly, but only for the person wearing the gloves. I honestly can't see the use of crack gloves becoming so widespread that grades need adjusting. They've been around for ages and only a handful of people use them. It's a personal choice - personally, I like the the feel of the rock on my skin.
leewil86 - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to buxtoncoffeelover:

"Your on grit now mate"....................Jesus Christ.
Mark Collins - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to dinodinosaur:

> You sir are weak...

...and enjoying it. Thankfully there are young whippersnappers like yourself taking up the slack
cb294 - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

What an idiotic post. Just look at the "officially accepted" tape gloves on display in the Randall/Whittaker videos. Compared to the standard Czech crack gloves they look like boxing mitts, especially the one they made by taping over the top of a gardening glove!

Whether I wear crack gloves, tape up, or accept some grit rash (on the backs of my thumbs, mainly) depends on the amount of jamming I expect on the day.

CB
1
Michael Hood - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to cb294: Wow, an opportunity to conflate 3 threads with one comment, stir the pot, and add a bit of ageism in as well

When I saw that the girls in that great little video on Zippatrocity were taped up, I thought that it was a bit girly and that they should have manned up and got some grit rash instead.

7
deepsoup - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:
> I laughed in his face and told him "you're on the Grit now mate. "

The only funny thing about your story is that you think it makes the other guy look bad. Bellend.

GrahamD - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

Smells like BS on so many levels but to answer the question: Gloves are infinitely preferable to smart arsed snidey gits at Stanage
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

When other people wear them on grit...... they are fine.

When my friend wears them on grit.... totally unacceptable and just another fine reason to take the piss.
johncook - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to TobyA:

Texans buy them and use them. Maybe it is because they have soft hands from all the oil they use when cleaning their guns?
(There really are a lot of jammies (crack gloves) in certain areas of the USA. Saw many when in Indian Creek, and the rock there is so nice it leaves a polish on your skin, unlike grit which leaves memories!
GPN - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> ...and if so do they effect the grade of the climb?

No. They affect the grade of the climb ;-)

planetmarshall on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> I laughed in his face and told him "you're on the Grit now mate. "

Assuming this actually happened, I'm sure you don't need anyone else to tell you it makes you sound like a massive douche.

And also, you're a massive douche.
NigeR on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

> Me and my friends were climbing at Stanage Popular when I noticed a man wearing crack gloves (hardened rubber wrist gloves). He was racking up and about to lead Robin Hood Right Hand Buttress Direct (which is a weak route in itself). I started up Inverted-V at the same time as the American crack glove guy and reached the top at the same time. At the top he asked me "were is the fixed protection?" I laughed in his face and told him "you're on the Grit now mate. "

> So, are crack gloves acceptable on Grit and is so do they effect the grade of the climb?

I know what you meanl. I feel the same when I watch people chalking up for V Diffs
5
EarlyBird - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):

Anyone I might know?
Mark Kemball - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

Much as I dislike replying to what seems to be someone living under a bridge, I must say, crack gloves are a very good idea on grit. As I have got older, the skin on the back of my hands, scarred from jamming in my youth, has grown thinner. If I jam without gloves now, the skin opens up very quickly, I love jamming, to me the choice is wear gloves or don't climb cracks.
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to EarlyBird:
Stuart....... apparently he has delicate skin
Post edited at 16:39
gribble - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

Have a 'like' Mark!
Mark Kemball - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to gribble:

From you of all people Graham! Sol and I are planning to be at the Downes first weekend in Feb, suspect I'll be stuck in awesome walls for most of it, but might be able to manage some time out early Saturday evening. Fancy some "cracks by headtorch"? I would, of course, be wearing my gloves! (Just to keep thngs on topic.)
mark s - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

never used crack gloves but have taped up to the extent it is like a glove,its needed on some routes
Mick Ward - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to mark s:

Have never taped but should have! Agree, needed on some routes. The dripping in blood option becomes a little wearying.

Mick
Timmd on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to deepsoup:
> The only funny thing about your story is that you think it makes the other guy look bad. Bellend.

I've probably been vaguely similarly out of order when I was younger to be fair. It was towards an older brother at a climbing wall and my family 'told me how it was' later on.

Everybody needs older siblings to keep them in check.


Edit: I've noticed the difference in my oldest sibling ;-) ;-)
Post edited at 17:24
mark s - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Mick Ward:

it also makes what should be enjoyable routes actually enjoyable. i have done some with out gloves and just hated every minute but done them again with gloves and the smile goes from ear to ear
hang_about - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

Channeling the spirit of the times I suppose we should be chanting "Lock him up! Lock him up!"

Christheclimber on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

> Much as I dislike replying to what seems to be someone living under a bridge, I must say, crack gloves are a very good idea on grit. As I have got older, the skin on the back of my hands, scarred from jamming in my youth, has grown thinner. If I jam without gloves now, the skin opens up very quickly, I love jamming, to me the choice is wear gloves or don't climb cracks.

I agree, I find jamming much harder now than I did when I was a youth. Thinking of getting some gloves for the grit.
cb294 - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Michael Hood:

> Wow, an opportunity to conflate 3 threads with one comment, stir the pot, and add a bit of ageism in as well

It is an art!

CB
Michael Hood - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to cb294:

Unfortunately no bites yet
Michael Gordon - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

I don't see any reason why tape would be acceptable but gloves not.
Timmd on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Christheclimber:
> I agree, I find jamming much harder now than I did when I was a youth. Thinking of getting some gloves for the grit.

I'll always remember my Dad trying to hand jam in his 50's after quite a while away from doing that in climbing, and struggling rather and ending up with 'badly bitten' backs of hands and knuckles, he was a bit perturbed as I remember.

Weird how these things can wash over you as a teenager somehow, as an adult I'd have been more concerned I think. Though I've never been heartless.
Post edited at 21:34
EarlyBird - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):

I think I tried his gloves. They do make a difference although they felt a bit awkward. I might have to try taping up because my hands aren't as resilient as they used to be.
Mark Kemball - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Christheclimber:

> I agree, I find jamming much harder now than I did when I was a youth. Thinking of getting some gloves for the grit.

You won't regret it!
TobyA on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

I've been using the Singing Rock ones for years, and partly as a result I'm scheduled to be doing a UKC review of the jamming gloves that are available this spring. Should be interesting. I've seen a few folk with them now on gritstone - nothing like as popular as they have become in Finland, which is my previous climbing community, but I don't think I had seen anyone at all wearing them in the UK before last year beside me!
deepsoup - on 22 Jan 2017
In reply to Timmd:
> I've probably been vaguely similarly out of order when I was younger to be fair.

As a teen, well who hasn't? I was a right nob, god it makes me cringe looking back on it. I just thank my lucky stars the internet hadn't been invented yet. Your immediate family have to put up with it, for them it's just part of the job description. ;-)
Darron - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Webster:

> nearly all American routes regardless of style (except remote mountain routes) have chain anchors at the top, and often bolt belays throughout if they are multi-pitch

Absolute rubbish.
3
cat22 - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Darron:

It's certainly the case on the West coast of the US (where I've been living the past couple of years) - I was pretty surprised the other day to build a belay at the top of a single pitch route. It felt like a long time since I'd last done that!
1
cb294 - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Michael Hood:

Yes, it is a shame. Maybe I should have stuck to slagging off the St. Wideboyz, instead of admitting that I regularly use jamming gloves!

In any case, both Singing Rock and Ocun gloves are a common sight in Saxon and especially Czech sandstone, where you have to protect your hands, and gloves pretty quickly come cheaper than rolls and rolls of tape.

Ethically (what a pompous word for what we are talking about!) and technically it makes absolutely no difference whether you have three layers of tape on your hands or a wearing a thin glove. In fact, I often use both (separate tape for the knuckles of my thumbs).

I am even thinking about getting similar pads for the inside of my ankles, as I am slightly sick of bleeding into my shoes every single time I climb a certain size of offwidth (just below knee bar width).

CB
Mark Kemball - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to TobyA:

I bought a pair of Occun gloves, mainly for a trip to Lofoten. They were totally brilliant, I would have had a miserable time on all those cracks without them. My partner did not have a pair but it didn't take him long to search the shops for some. I tested them on grit before going, superb, jamming became a pleasure instead of a pain. I wouldn't want to be without them now. On multipitch, they stay zipped in my pocket, and come out whenever there's a crack, and down here on Dartmoor granite...
Ged Desforges - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Mark Kemball:

I reckon most brits would be a lot better at crack climbing if they learned to jam with tape/gloves. You can actually learn how to do it rather than tear your hands to bits. No prizes for falling off with mangled fists.

And after all, if they're good enough for Ondra...
Andy Hardy on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

I'd say this scores a solid 9/10. Semi plausible scenario, good hook *and* you haven't replied to any comments.
deepsoup - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Andy Hardy:
> I'd say this scores a solid 9/10. Semi plausible scenario, good hook *and* you haven't replied to any comments.

Too generous.

The story is corroborated by two other posters above - if it's a troll it's a team effort, so you'd have to mark it down at least a couple of points for that.
Andy Hardy on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to deepsoup:

Good. Grief.

note to self: Read the thread!
Morty - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to richy85:

You should rename this thread 'cack hugs in my marriage'.
dinodinosaur - on 23 Jan 2017
In reply to Andy Hardy:
Team work makes the dream work. But thanks for your original score of 9/10 I think we did well!

Edit: still nowhere near my pb of 218 replies...
https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?n=654744
Post edited at 23:29
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Mark Kemball - on 24 Jan 2017
In reply to dinodinosaur:

Not that good a troll, it was called out fairly early on, and a lot of the discussion was about the merits of crack gloves and fairly sensible. Not the fire storm of a good troll.

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