UKC

/ falling/jumping into water

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la xerra - on 16 Apr 2018

hi, i am gonna do some free-solo climbing here on the coast of asturias (northern spain). question: is there a formular or a rule-of-thumb that helps me establish how deep the water has to be at a certain level of height to fall/jump from. mil veces, pit

ps,

are any of you folks canyoneering? (would be nice to have a seperate forum for that).

Alex Riley on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to la xerra:

I was told you wouldnt go any deeper than 15/16 ft by friends (who were very keen cliff jumpers at the time). A quick google seems to agree with those numbers.

My advice would be build up slowly, start low. I've done 20-40ft jumps where I've hit the bottom, but been fine. Be prepared for what to expect (ie, if you think you might hit the bottom be dynamic on entering the water).

Have fun, but use common sense and only do what you are comfortable with. I've jumped 70ft+ bridges a few times and wouldn't again, I just don't think the risk is worth it anymore (and it messes up my sinuses).

la xerra - on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to Alex Riley:

alex, what i try to figure out is how deep the water has to be (minimum) at what height of the fall/jump***... and get out of the water without being turned into scrambled eggs -:-cheers

*** sure, i suppose body-weight, as well as -structure, matter , too - but for reasons of simplicity maybe we ignore that

Liamhutch89 - on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to la xerra:

No formula will show this with accuracy. If you open up in the water you could half the depth you might go to otherwise. This depends on timing, body shape/size, angle of entry, etc. in addition to the height of the jump.

Alex Riley on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to Liamhutch89:

What Liam says is spot on. There is such a variety of factors and there is no such safe height. A bad fall from a low height into deep water could have much worse consequences than a higher fall into shallower water with a good landing.

Over 70-80ft you will want to start breaking the surface tension (unlikely in a dws situation).

Post edited at 15:52
deepsoup - on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to Alex Riley:

> Over 70-80ft you will want to start breaking the surface tension (unlikely in a dws situation).

That's a myth I'm afraid.  If you're falling too fast into water the surface tension is the least of your problems.

Alex Riley on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to deepsoup:

Yeh my bad, however the more air in the water the better (like choppy water or pools with waterfalls into them).

The myth busters tested this after found surface tension didn't make much difference. However they also said anything over 46m would be lethal and the world record is 58.8m

David Coley - on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to Alex Riley:

Isn't one of the issues with such high jumps that the legs can head off sideways at speed in different directions?

Alex Riley on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to David Coley:

It's a distinct possibility, I've heard a dry wetsuit is better than a wet one in this situation ;)

Basically to the op, take it easy, built up slow, don't do more than you are happy with and have fun!

la xerra - on 16 Apr 2018

quote:  ...wikipedia lists two records - 11.2m dive into .3m of water, and 33.5m into 2.4m of water....

https://www.mountainproject.com/forum/topic/108477443/how-deep-does-the-water-need-to-be-for-dws

sounds surreal... but then, wtf do i know

 

wintertree - on 16 Apr 2018
In reply to la xerra:

It can feel like you are plunging down, down down for far longer and far deeper than you are.  Hold your nerve - and your breath!

Practice - Find out where local youth go toomstombing, get a lot of beta from them and go for it.  Carefully. Exactly where lots of them did without dying. To within inches of their spot 

gravy - on 16 Apr 2018

 

I kid you not the record is an 11.5m into 30cm of water.

captain paranoia - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to David Coley:

> Isn't one of the issues with such high jumps that the legs can head off sideways at speed in different directions?

Or, if you enter the water with legs slightly forward, you can jack-knife and break your back...

la xerra - on 17 Apr 2018

<i>So, as a rough guide, if you plan to land feet first and in a straight, upright position, you're going to need at least 8 feet of water. If you're up any higher than 5 or 6 feet, you'll need 10 feet or more, and above 20 feet you'll need the full 16 foot depth to insure you do not break bones hitting the bottom.</i>

source:
https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-calculate-how-deep-in-water-you-will-fall-by-the-altitude-from-which-you-jump-and-other-factors
 

 

la xerra - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to wintertree:

... Find out where local youth go toomstombing, get a lot of beta from them...

local youth got drowned in digital sewage

jkarran - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to la xerra:

How do you plan to measure the depth?

It's one of those things you just need to experiment with, build up your knowledge of jumping, landing, the crag and the sub-surface layout carefully. Swim, dive with a mask, visit at low tide, beware of undercut ledges and caves that can suck you in or trap you. Be conservative, a bad landing on land maybe breaks a leg, a broken leg is all the excuse the sea needs to kill you and it doesn't need any excuse. That or go somewhere developed with people who know the place and have done the hard work.

Beware especially in rivers but also in the sea after storms of major changes to the environment, the sea can move huge boulders or thousands of tons of sand with ease overnight and a branch or tangle of old fencing in a river could really spoil your day.

jk

Wainers44 - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to jkarran:

> How do you plan to measure the depth?

 

And if you are on the coast the swell can also make a huge difference. It's really hard to judge the swell height in unbroken seas and if soloing you can hardly time your jump to hit swell peak! 

There are probably a dozen or so tombstoning accidents down here every year. Occasionally they are fatal, often they result in life changing injuries and the seas down here are quite calm normally!

Toerag - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to la xerra:

Start by jumping low and work your way higher until you hit the bottom. If you go in straight you'll go deep, if you go in as it you're sat in an armchair you'll stop quickly.

la xerra - on 17 Apr 2018
In reply to gravy:

the record is an 11.5m into 30cm of water

this one just blows my mind.... havent cracked yet how its *works*.... like hitting the water with biggest available body-surface, thus: stretched out all fours, like lying in bed¿¿

 

 

la xerra - on 18 Apr 2018

Shallow diving

is an extreme sport, whereby enthusiasts attempt to dive from the greatest height into the shallowest depth of water, without sustaining injury. It is typically associated with travelling circuses along with the strongman, performing animals, clowns and other such attractions.
Technique

Divers aim to hit the water horizontally in a manner akin to the Belly flop. This spreads the impact over the greatest surface area, and achieves the fastest deceleration.
World record

    Professor Splash (ne. Darren Taylor) successfully dove from 36.6 feet (11.15 m) into a paddling pool of depth 1 foot (30 cm).[1]
    Roy Fransen successfully dove from 110 feet (33.5 m) into 8 feet (2.4 m) of water.

References
 "BBC News - Shallow diver breaks world record for paddling pool jump".


source:
https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Shallow_diving.html
 


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