UKC

/ Old Man of Hoy

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Mik93 - on 13 May 2018

A Few Dollars More (E3 5c)

Hey, I'm Italian climber.

I'll be in Scotland the first week of June and I would climb "The Old Man of Hoy", "A Few Dollars More" route.

Anyone can help me please?

How the anchors are? And how to abseil from top?

thank you very much

tom84 - on 13 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

its a trad route so there aren't any anchors, look out for the fulmars!

 

Offwidth - on 13 May 2018
In reply to tom84:

There are equipt anchors for the abseil descent. Only intermediate anchors need your own gear.

More info here: http://www.orkney-seastacks.co.uk/oldman.htm

henwardian - on 13 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

On the ascent you must make your own anchors with traditional gear. The descent is by 3 abseils from situ anchors. The abseil points are made up of lots of rusty pitons and bits of cord, sling and rope attached to a single maillon, they look a bit unpleasant but they are solid. You need 2x 60m half ropes for the abseil descent as anything shorter makes the abseil descent more complicated.

Do you have a partner? I'm living on Orkney Mainland just now and would be keen to get on that route if you are looking for someone to climb with.

I assume from your photo that you have plenty of experience climbing with traditional gear?

tom84 - on 13 May 2018
In reply to Offwidth:

hahaha cheers, yeah was there last july and had a good time on the old man- read it as asking what the equipping was like (i.e. were the anchors bolted) doh!

 

GrahamD - on 14 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

I would say be prepared to place your own abseil anchors but there is generally so much in-situ gear you might well not need to use it.

Mik93 - on 15 May 2018
In reply to henwardian:

Hey, thank you for your time and informations!

Unfortunately, or fortunately, I have already a partner I'm sorry ;) but if you want we can drink something the day before or after!!

I have experience with traditional gear but most of times you can find anchors bolted in Italy(in particular, dolomites and alps)...

GrahamD - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

If you are used to older Dolomite descents, I think the Old Man of Hoy descent will feel very similar - in situ 'tat' in various condition.  Do you have two 60m ropes ? that makes the last pitch of descent much, much easier than single/shorter ropes.

SCC Changed - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

You won't need to leave anything on the anchors on the descent- its all equipped with maillons/rusty krabs etc. Personally, I find it less stressful doing the ab in 4 rather than 3- if the rope gets stuck on the upper bits at least you have some to lead back up with. definitely 60s needed though, especially as you don't intend climbing the original route and hence leaving an insitu rope.

Michael Gordon - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

(Obviously), familiarise yourself with the line of Original Route in advance. The first ab is down the big top corner, the second ab is a longer one diagonally down to your right (looking down). The final ab is 55m straight down to the base. 

johncoxmysteriously - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Michael Gordon:

 

If what the OP means by ‘anchors’ is the belays on the way up, these won’t be fixed. The descent will be, or certainly was five years ago.

 

jcm

 

SCC Changed - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Michael Gordon:

that's why i think 4 is better- from the base of the corner on the top pitch, I'm pretty sure you wont get down to the stance at the top of the second (i.e. final ab station)with 60s- a german couple were having a bit of an epic having attempted precisely this last time I was there in June

Michael Gordon - on 16 May 2018
In reply to SCC Changed:

When I did it I linked the top 2 pitches in the first ab, then the 3rd pitch for a shorter 2nd ab, which definitely works with rope lengths. That's interesting it not working the other way - hadn't occurred to me.

henwardian - on 21 May 2018
In reply to Mik93:

> Unfortunately, or fortunately, I have already a partner I'm sorry ;) but if you want we can drink something the day before or after!!

Sure, sounds good, I'll mail you.

> I have experience with traditional gear but most of times you can find anchors bolted in Italy(in particular, dolomites and alps)...

You basically always have to build your own anchors in Scotland on multi-pitch routes. The only exceptions are where it is an in situ abseil point, but even then it isn't ever bolts, it's a mixture of pitons, nuts, slings and other rotting garbage!

 


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