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/ Ticks in Avon Gorge New Quarry

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ericinbristol - on 17 May 2018

I climbed in Avon Gorge New Quarry and came away with a tick behind one knee and a tick on my neck. First time I have ever had them here. I don't know if the ones in this area carry Lyme disease. 

d_b on 17 May 2018
In reply to ericinbristol:

The first time I heard of ticks on that side was last year.  Never seen any sign of them before.  Maybe blame the goats?

The Leigh Woods side has always been horrific of course.

I don't know of anyone catching Lyme in Avon but my policy is to watch every tick bite for a few weeks to check for the rash and be extra paranoid about sympoms.

Rob Morgan on 17 May 2018
In reply to ericinbristol:

I've had ticks from climbing at Suspension Bridge Buttress too. Anywhere vegetated around the gorge is a risk.

oldie - on 17 May 2018
In reply to d_b:

Sheep ticks are apparently the most important carrier of Lyme disease and can be found on a variety of animals including deer and foxes. The younger stages often live on small mammals. 

You probably know that less than half of Lyme infections show the bullseye rash.

I have never knowingly been bitten (yet) though I often walk through long vegetation frequented by deer especially in Dorset and Richmond park near London (both Lyme hotspots I believe). I wear long trousers but don't tuck them into my socks. On the other hand my son frequently gets them, including at his school in West London. Our neighbour got Lyme disease in Richmond Park (no rash) which was confirmed after he nagged his GP

It seems it is important to remove them ASAP as then they are unlikely to have transmitted the virus.

Sorry no answer to Lyme prevalence in OP's area. Southern England and the Highlands are quoted as high risk.

Cheese Monkey - on 17 May 2018
In reply to ericinbristol:

Goats up there

d_b on 17 May 2018
In reply to oldie:

I have had vast numbers of ticks at Goblin Combe and Leigh Woods but so far no Lyme fortunately.

I understand the rash doesn't always come up, which is why I am paranoid about any flu like symptoms in the weeks after a bite.

Just so everyone knows what to look for:

https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/signs_symptoms/index.html

Post edited at 10:46
Paz - on 17 May 2018
In reply to d_b:

I never had any at all before they introduced the new goatsheep, and ticks really like me everywhere else.

 

Hopefully ticks will put off the doggers or whoever it is leaving the horrible stuff in the woods.

Rob Morgan on 17 May 2018
In reply to oldie:

It can take 24 hours for Lyme disease to migrate from an infected tick to your body, so as long as you do a thorough check after each climbing session your chances are much better.

cwarby - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Rob Morgan:

Have to say that having a dog and having  pulled 3 out from him in the last 2years, I carry the removers with me, even if he's not with me. So easy to use.

Eric - take care, I'm sure you've looked up all the info. Get to GP if anything untoward.

Chris

captain paranoia - on 18 May 2018
In reply to oldie:

> unlikely to have transmitted the virus.

You're right about the high false negative rate of the bullseye rash (erythema migrans), but it's a bacterium, not a virus, so can be treated in early stages with antibiotics.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borrelia_burgdorferi

oldie - on 18 May 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

> but it's a bacterium, not a virus, so can be treated in early stages with antibiotics. <

Thanks. Of course its a bacterium (a spirochaete ).  Don't know why I typed that. Aging brain cells

 

d_b on 18 May 2018
In reply to oldie:

Blame it on the Lyme.


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