UKC

/ Orienteering and GPS

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
Al Evans on 08 May 2018

Has GPS infected Orienteering yet, or is it still just a good old map and compass

Jim Lancs on 08 May 2018
In reply to Al Evans:

Not allowed in competitions.

summo on 08 May 2018
In reply to Al Evans:

> Has GPS infected Orienteering yet, or is it still just a good old map and compass

Still map and compass. Many run with GPS watch and download routes after. There are a few software systems(route gadget for one) where everyone can draw in their route, the system knows how long each leg took, so you can compare route choices. 

Cheating isn't possible in most races as you don't know the course until the clock is running, so no chance to pre programme devices. 

MJAngry on 08 May 2018
In reply to summo:

Also, the maps aren't strickly on grid. They are drawn to mag North not grid north. Plus there is not a grid as such, just line indicating magnetic North. 

 

Unless you are talking about mountain marathons, in which case they would really take the skill and therefore fun out of it. 

summo on 08 May 2018
In reply to MJAngry:

I don't think GPS would ever take over even if allowed. There is so much more to route choice than optimum straight lines between points.(as you are no doubt aware). Forest density, over a hill or contour, long fast track or short complex naving... a person who was GPS reliant just wouldn't be competitive enough if they tried to point to point everything. 

Even changing scales on maps at different events would make GPS use tough. I had a mare last night running on 1:7500 and 2m contours... The level of detail took a few legs to tune into.   

Post edited at 15:56
Irk the Purist - on 08 May 2018
In reply to summo:

Assuming you could get them to work on the maps, a ten figure grid would allow someone to zero in on a control from 100m or so without the need for micro navigation. It would also allow instant checking for errors and remove the need for such skills as aiming off, pacing/timing, and relocation. You would still need orienteering skill but it would make it a lot easier.

But the question is a bit like asking if cars have been allowed into equestrian events yet. 

summo on 08 May 2018
In reply to Irk the Purist:

Got my pondering this... I can see what you mean as you home in on a control, but it's getting the map onto the GPS unit that would be tough. On a longer MM you could potentially work out the features the controls are on and find them on a normal 1:50000 as you plod along. It might be something that needs addressing in the future as they become smaller and better. Or with head up displays on sun glasses.. a motion sensor in the glasses and an arrow flashes up telling you to run left, right or straight on.

DancingOnRock - on 08 May 2018
In reply to Al Evans:

Rules 10.5, 10.6, 10.7.

Artifical aids other than compass not allowed.

GPS only allowed to record tracks. 

Mobile phones not allowed for navigation purposes. 

https://www.britishorienteering.org.uk/document/0dc59b208eb80a36bab27172c8015996/Rules%20of%20Orienteering%20Effective%202018v3-7_Feb%2018.pdf#page13

 

Post edited at 22:40
Simon Caldwell - on 11 May 2018
In reply to Al Evans:

A couple of the big fell running clubs have just banned GPS from their races and there's predictable uproar about it... 

DancingOnRock - on 11 May 2018
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Seems a bit draconian. GPS units or GPS watches? 

Post edited at 15:57
subtle on 11 May 2018
In reply to Al Evans:

> Has GPS infected Orienteering yet, or is it still just a good old map and compass

Why has orienteering not evolved to use Gps yet?

Map and compass, whilst still good, were yesterdays technology

Time to move on surely?

summo on 11 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

> Why has orienteering not evolved to use Gps yet?

Because it would be as easy and dull as geocaching? ;) 

 

subtle on 11 May 2018
In reply to summo:

> Because it would be as easy and dull as geocaching? ;) 

but still with the time element so not as dull

summo on 11 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

> but still with the time element so not as dull

Speed geo caching... I can hardly contain myself. Live televised... Baldwin commentating? Best get onto the IOC too. 

subtle on 11 May 2018
In reply to summo:

> Speed geo caching... I can hardly contain myself. Live televised... Baldwin commentating? Best get onto the IOC too. 

as opposed to televised speed climbing, yawn

or snooker

or darts

or orienteering?

summo on 11 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

> as opposed to televised speed climbing, yawn

Agreed.

> or snooker> or darts

And again.

> or orienteering?

Not usually televised live. Although they do put remote cameras at some events and radio beacons on controls, even live tracking of runners. But then orienteering is about individual challenges, not audiences. 

So back to GPS orienteering... pointless.   

subtle on 11 May 2018
In reply to summo:

> So back to GPS orienteering... pointless.   

As opposed to using a map and compass for orienteering then - thus showing the ability to read a map and compass.

Anyway, at least with geocacheing you sometimes get to keep some treasure  - you know, a plastic spinning top, or a shiny button - far betterer than pointless bumbling about with a map and compass 

Simon Caldwell - on 11 May 2018
In reply to DancingOnRock:

> Seems a bit draconian. GPS units or GPS watches? 

GPS of any sort for navigation. OK for tracking. Impossible to police of course but a good statement of intent IMO. 

Lusk - on 11 May 2018
In reply to subtle:

> as opposed to televised speed climbing, yawn etc...

It was quite good 'fun' tracking the runners on the computer doing the big Spine race this winter.
An occasional bit of video coverage would have been good, especially considering the conditions they were 'running' in!

summo on 11 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

> It was quite good 'fun' tracking the runners on the computer doing the big Spine race this winter.

Each summer there is a 20 stage orienteering race, usually around 70 teams. Each runner isn't live tracked, but there are several controls live linked, several cameras and the results table is constantly updated as each individual runner finish.. whilst not as good as following blips on the spine race.. It does still draw you in.

But no GPS allowed  

 

Post edited at 17:22
Michael Hood - on 11 May 2018
In reply to subtle: GPS would totally ruin orienteering. The whole point is to be able to relate the map to the ground, ie where am I. Not much of a challenge if the GPS just tells you.

 


Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.