UKC

/ Wet cold marathon advice pls

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norrisdan71 on 12 Jun 2018

Hi

I’m running the Tromsø marathon on Saturday and the forecast predictably is for rain and 10 degrees. My training runs have mostly been in the dry. Do I a) tough it out in bin bag (for a bit) shorts, montane windproof smock, merino long sleeve and Byrnje undershirt or b) try to weatherproof myself with a lightweight waterproof and sealskinz socks etc?

Would a cheapish cycling waterproof do or is it time to break out credit cards and get a specialist waterproof top?

Your experiences and wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

Marek - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

In my experience waterproofs when running are pointless - none of them breathe well enough to stop you getting wet from sweat (and 10 degrees isn't particularly cold). I would use clothes with are 'OK' when wet (e.g., HH lifa) with the option of a pertex layer to cut down windchill. I'd avoid merino - it'll be horrible after an hour of rain. Waterproof sock are OK if your splashing through puddles, but if it's raining hard and water is running down your legs then they'll be worse than useless. If your feet are not used to being wet (when running) cover them with a thick layer of Vaseline before putting on your sock.

Anyway, that my advice based on years of soggy, splash, drenching mountain marathons in Scotland. Others may have differing opinions.

 

Post edited at 11:37
tony on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

Unless it's really heavy rain, I probably wouldn't bother with a waterproof - you'll get wet what ever you do. I would, however, be generous with the vaseline on the feet and crotch, and I would be very sure to remember to tape my nipples.

The New NickB - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

Wet and 10 degrees is good running conditions for me. You probably just need to avoid getting cold before the start. A bin bag and an old sweatshirt that can be dumped before the start would be fine for me.

I’d just be running in vest and shorts, how long are you planning on being out for?

norrisdan71 on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

Thanks for all the advice. 3 hours 50 is my target.

ClimberEd - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to The New NickB:

You probably just need to avoid getting cold before the start.

 

This, as long as you aren't cold when you start you should be fine in light kit that doesn't soak up water. (at 3.50 pace, less so if you were aiming for a more leisurely 5+)

mbh - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

What they all said. 10 degrees and keeping going for 3h 50 pace should be fine in the rain (not that I ever run that far, mind). Avoid flappy gear that clings to you in the wet and tape up. I find chafing worse in the wet.

Roadrunner6 - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

I'd just wear a long sleeve thermal at most, but possibly just a T-shirt. For me a vest wouldn't be enough at those temperatures. You'll sweat anyway. A actual jacket will be a sale in the wind but some elite women did wear them at Boston this year which is unheard of.

I'd also go short shorts unless its very cold. 10 C isn't that cold TBH. 

I did a marathon up the jersey shore one Feb into a winter storm so was running for 26 miles up the coast into hard northerlies with sand being blown at me. My thighs were a mess but had I worn leggings I think they'd have just got heavy and stretched in the wet.

Certainly normal socks, I'd start in cheap thin gloves so you can still have dexterity and throw them away if you think you are OK.

 

 

Post edited at 17:18
Doghouse - on 12 Jun 2018

In r

> Certainly normal socks, I'd start in cheap thin gloves so you can still have dexterity and throw them away if you think you are OK.

Or alternatively carry them with you to the finish to avoid littering the course. 

abr1966 - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

This post is nostalgia for me....posted in Norway for many years in the past and recognise the 10 degree plus rain summers! I used to use a tight breathable top to avoid any damp chaffing and a loose one on top....and definitely shorts that can dry a bit in the breeze. Look after your feet with good prep! 

Roadrunner6 - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to Doghouse:

There’s trash cans every few miles.. always within 50 yards of any aid station. That was a very odd post to assume that...

3
DancingOnRock - on 12 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

Depends on the wind. I ran the Rutland Water Marathon several years ago and it was similar conditions, maybe 6-7 degrees but with a serious wind chill factor. They were retiring marshals with borderline hypothermia.

I wore a t-short and shorts but also had a lightweight wind proof top, it wasn’t particularly water resistant but it’s the wind you need to keep off, not the water. Wore a hat and gloves but the top has pockets that the gloves and hat can go in if it’s too warm. 

SanchoPascoe - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

The conditions you are anticipating were quite normal for the Cornish marathon which is staged in November every year, for which my choice of attire would be shorts and running vest but with the addition of a thin hat and the aforementioned cheap thermal gloves. The aim was to bo be warm and comfortable. If it was rainning at the start I would wear a wind top which could be rolled up and tied around my waist. The earlier point of plenty of vaseline on the main chaffing points and good quality nipple tape is very valid. Wet clothing will stretch differently and rub you in places you have not been rubbed before! Watch out for under the arms and the toes as your feet will end up being soaked and the socks will move differently. At this stage its not a good idea to change anything of your system that you have been trainning in, stick to what works but get that vaseline on! And try and enjoy. Its oddly satisfying running in the wet! Have a good one.

summo on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Roadrunner6:

> There’s trash cans every few miles.. always within 50 yards of any aid station. That was a very odd post to assume that...

Since the boom in energy bars and gels a few events over here now have a litter zone, a 50m stretch where you can drop anything on the ground and they use a rake like scoop to clear it up. But get caught dropping anything elsewhere and you can be banned from future events.

SouthernSteve on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

given that my last two races have been wrecked by ridiculously heat I would relish 10?C. I am a slower runner and would were a very light waterproof at least at the start

JuneBob on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

I note it'll be a bit windy, and the course is quite exposed, so wind chill could be a factor.

I've never run a long race in the conditions like that, but for long training runs I wear a very lightweight waterproof which also protects against the wind, and some thin gloves.

I ran the course 2 years ago, no rain just overcast. Don't go too fast up the bridge!

Moley on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

Wet conditions are nothing to worry about, we have a waterproof skin and water on us does no harm. Simply find clothing that will not degenerate into a soggy chammie leather when soaked.

The problem is wind chill on wet and bonking out of energy, but this shouldn't happen on a standard marathon with hard running generating constant body heat. More of a problem at ultra distances or high level (mountain) events.

Roadrunner6 - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

I did a marathon a few weeks back and they had litter pickers like that. They had trash cans and asked us to try to throw cups in the rash but people around them to help.

I think races and runners are more aware of the trash problem. Trail races are increasingly going cup less here to reduce trash and plastic waste.

 

Alan Breck on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

Long,  long ago I did a marathon where it was snowing at the finish. Looked like the retreat from Moscow. The only difference to my normal running kit was a lightweight pair of gloves.

I'd be reluctant to change any running kit so close to the event. Rubbing could be a big problem. If absolutely necessary go for something really fine but thermal. Old fashioned Lifa comes to mind. That and a normal running vest on top. an other option is sleeves for your arms. Usually biking kit. That advice is really for cold AND wet but you're more likely to be just wet.

I've no idea what the finish details are for your event but make sure that you get into something warm and dry ASAP. The proverbial bin bag helps as does the usual bit of tinfoil. These are useful at the start as well. Chuck them away when on the go.

You should be OK in shorts if the temp is around ten. Wouldn't bother with waterproof socks. Likely to be wet feet anyway after a while. Wear your normal socks but ensure that you stick a bit of Vaseline on. Not too much.

Best of luck.

summo on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Roadrunner6:

I think it's the tear off top gel packets that are the problem. Too manky to go back in your pocket and no screw cap to reseal. I try to avoid using them for this and other reasons. 

DancingOnRock - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

I had a plastic bag in my pocket for them when I used them. I’m not convinced they’re any good for you. They just send me on the sugar rush rollercoaster. 

Roadrunner6 - on 14 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

I just time them before aid stations so I can grab water and drop them in the trash.

I use gu so just tear them half way and squeeze the gel out. 

The recent marathon was sponsored by Untapped, which is just pure maple syrup so the syrup ended up going everywhere as it was liquidy. I love maple syrup but it didn't sit well in my stomach.

In reply to DancingOnRock:

> Depends on the wind. 

I listened to various interviews post this year's Boston marathon and it sounded as though even very experienced elite runners hadn't appreciated the effect the wind would have on them (in addition to the forecast heavy rain and low ambient temp). Sage Canaday (who dropped out at around 20 miles) showed his HR data and it slowing, despite maintaining an even pace... as he became increasingly hypothermic.

 Des Linden won the women's in a full-on anorak and mitts!

Hannah V - on 14 Jun 2018
In reply to norrisdan71:

I'll be doing the half marathon in Tromsø this weekend and am going for shorts and thin thermal top (maybe also a pair of thin gloves). Tested out this combination a few weeks ago when it was 6 degrees, windy and rain showers and it worked fine It probably won't even rain that much anyway!

yorkshireman - on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

> I think it's the tear off top gel packets that are the problem. Too manky to go back in your pocket and no screw cap to reseal. I try to avoid using them for this and other reasons. 

I used to have a little mesh rubbish bag that would clip to my backpack that was given out by a local trail race - great for that. Unfortunately in a twist of irony I lost it on a trail race.

I now stuff all trash in the back zip pocket of my shorts. I'm quite meticulous with gels - rip the top off, eat the gel, then roll up the ripped off top carefully in the rest of the gel to a) not lose it and b) stop the remnants of gel going anywhere.

 

shuffle - on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to summo:

I've heard lots of folk say that an empty gel packet can't go back in your pocket but I really don't see why not. It's going to be sticky, yes, but your running clothes are sweaty and presumably going in the wash straight after the race, so why does it matter?


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