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/ 30 things.......

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kevin stephens - on 05 Mar 2018
Dave Kerr - on 05 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

Baton Remasse is a new one to me. Good list.

kevin stephens - on 05 Mar 2018
In reply to Dave Kerr:

> Baton Remasse is a new one to me. Good list.

Yes but different to trying to keep shoulders facing the fall line when side slipping. I'd need to practice transition from stepping (baton Remasse) to side slipping

Swirly - on 05 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens: Not from the first time but: just because the ropes were long enough in April  doesn't mean they'll be long enough in February.

 

kevin stephens - on 05 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

A dislike for a link to a BMC entertaining article.  There's some sad f*cks on this forum

3
Pinch'a'salt on 06 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

Why would you want to keep your shoulders facing the fall line when sideslipping though?

2
kevin stephens - on 06 Mar 2018
In reply to Pinch'a'salt:

It gives you much better control to slide forward and back (skier's left and right), for example in a narrow winding gulley, also puts you in position so you can quickly swing the skis 180 degrees if needed.  That's what I've been taught anyway and it seems to work and make sense to me.  

 

Post edited at 22:33
Jim 1003 - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

> It gives you much better control to slide forward and back (skier's left and right), for example in a narrow winding gulley, also puts you in position so you can quickly swing the skis 180 degrees if needed.  That's what I've been taught anyway and it seems to work and make sense to me.  

Rubbish, it doesn't even make vague sense to do this when sideslipping.

Post edited at 00:33
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kevin stephens - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to Jim 1003:ok thanks that’s interesting, I’ll question it if I’m instructed that way again. I’ve found that as my skiing advances there’s a fair bit of conflicting information out there

 

Dave Kerr - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

>  I’ve found that as my skiing advances there’s a fair bit of conflicting information out there

I'm of the opinion that once you get to the side stepping point style has already gone out the window and the only thing that matters is getting down safely. So basically, whatever works for you and screw what the style police say!

 

Dave Kerr - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

Although 'screw what the style police say' could describe all my skiing, not just the sidestepping so I'm probably not the best person to listen to.

Pete Houghton - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to Dave Kerr:

Instead of sideslipping or sidestepping, try sidejumping. You cover more ground in a shorter time, and it looks pretty f*cking cool in the video.

daWalt on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

makes sense to me too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bgenBQQ6qIt=1m17s

but care must be taken with advice or comment from...... the internet! 

kevin stephens - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to daWalt:

Thanks for that, some vindication

Pinch'a'salt on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

Imagine 6 o'clock is downhill and 3 and 9 are hard left and hard right. For a sideslip straight downhill your skis need to be at 3 or 9. Doing this with your shoulders facing the fall line is nigh-on impossible unless you have ridiculously flexible hips. To control the direction of a sideslip you need to be able to steer your skis either side of 3 or 9 (ie potentially towards 2 and towards 10). This will be impossible with your shoulders facing down the fall line...

@DaveKerr function creates form. Its nothing to do with 'style' and all to do with function. If it functions well it will look good if you want it to...

 

kevin stephens - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to Pinch'a'salt:

Fair comment and I agree absolutely with your description, I hadn't intended my language to be so precise, it would have been more accurate if I had said "shoulders facing more toward the fall line" I  was just commenting that the posture you accurately describe does not fit with the useful Baton Remasse technique illustrated in the BMC link.  All about having a versatile and wide range of tools for different snow and terrain and how to adapt and blend them effectively.  Usually if it feels right it is right, and better a well executed side slip than sketchy jump  turn any day

Dave Kerr - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to Pinch'a'salt:

Pro tips for free. What's not to like? ;) 

Jim 1003 - on 07 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Fair comment and I agree absolutely with your description, I hadn't intended my language to be so precise, it would have been more accurate if I had said "shoulders facing more toward the fall line" I  was just commenting that the posture you accurately describe does not fit with the useful Baton Remasse technique illustrated in the BMC link.  All about having a versatile and wide range of tools for different snow and terrain and how to adapt and blend them effectively.  Usually if it feels right it is right, and better a well executed side slip than sketchy jump  turn any day

Why don't you just say, Yes I posted a load of bollocks...at least you didn't mention the white dot preachers...

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Dave Kerr - on 08 Mar 2018
In reply to Jim 1003:

> Why don't you just say, Yes I posted a load of bollocks...at least you didn't mention the white dot preachers...

Looking at it from another direction, why are you being so arsey over a pretty minor point of skiing technique? 

Ben Briggs - on 08 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

I agree with you.

When it’s bad enough to side step (pretty rare) I will have an ace in my up hill hand and replace it with every step, obviously to do this the shoulders will be facing in the same direction as the skis. 

However when side slipping I always aim to keep my upper body facing down the slope, as if poised to make a jump turn. Obviously not completely at 90 degrees to the ski direction but in a downhill direction. I see several advantages. You have a good view down the slope as apose to across it so you can move more quickly as you see what’s coming. You are in a position to more quickly start turning again. I also find it also helps maintain the correct edge angle, pushing the upper body away from the slope as oppose to laying into it which could cause you to lose your edge on steep hard snow. 

 

Scomuir on 08 Mar 2018
In reply to Ben Briggs:

Wot he said ^

Turning to face downhill slightly if side slipping on steepish ground does allow me to make a turn more easily should the opportunity arise, if that's what the intention is.

Pinch'a'salt on 10 Mar 2018
In reply to Ben Briggs:

Agree with both those points...

But having had 20+ years of dealing with people who can't steer their skis far enough to scrub speed efficiently because they are trying to 'keep their shoulders pointing downhill' I get quite pedantic over accurate choice of words and use of that phrase and concept!

 

 

JuneBob on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to Pinch'a'salt:

Often if sideslipping in tricky situations I slide forward and backward, it's easier to see what I'm doing if I'm facing downhill rather than trying to look over my shoulder.

nniff - on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

Forgive me if this is old hat, but I'm at best a successful incompetent piste skier and so this is a foray into an unfamiliar world,  and this made me laugh out loud:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPP2YHR02BA

galpinos on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to nniff:

I enjoy most of Enak Gavaggio's stuff as Rancho but this is by far the best episode imho, especially if you have a little knowledge of steep skiing in Cham.

kevin stephens - on 20 Mar 2018
In reply to nniff:

great video

captain paranoia - on 20 Mar 2018
In reply to Ben Briggs:

> You have a good view down the slope

I find that my neck is more flexible than my waist...

kevin stephens - on 24 Mar 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

I think it's more about hip (ball and socket joints at top of thighs) flexibility than waist flexibility

John Stainforth - on 24 Mar 2018
In reply to Pete Houghton:

So it's about looking cool! Perhaps dead cool, or cool and dead!


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