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/ Ski edges rubbing jacket in A-frame carry

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Tricadam on 11 Mar 2018

I've found that, particularly if climbing with skis in A-frame carry, I can get a fair bit of rubbing of ski edges on my jacket. Does anyone have an easy, lightweight solution to this?

kenr - on 11 Mar 2018

Almost all modern skiing-specific backpacks are designed to have skis attached in a (quicker more convenient) non-A-frame configuration.

Other than purchasing a new backpack . . .

* Choose to do tours in places with more reliable snow that don't require carrying skis so much.

* Presumably on a long stretch booting up, you're going to remove some clothing just to avoid sweating too much. So instead of stuffing that clothing into your pack, wrap it around your skis.

Ken

6
Dave Kerr - on 11 Mar 2018
In reply to kenr:

> * Choose to do tours in places with more reliable snow that don't require carrying skis so much.

And the prize for least helpful answer of the week goes to...

 

Tricadam on 11 Mar 2018
In reply to kenr:

> Almost all modern skiing-specific backpacks are designed to have skis attached in a (quicker more convenient) non-A-frame configuration.

I do indeed usually use a diagonal carry. However, as alluded to in the OP, I sometimes climb (ice, or easy mixed) with skis attached, where A-frame is very much preferable. And hence the question. 

Pete Houghton - on 11 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

I have a Deuter 35+ (my second one, smashing bag; good and heavy, rugged, hardwearing... none of this fast-and-light nonsense), the top straps for A-frame carry have a sewn-off section (towards the spine side) preventing the ski from coming too close to your back when you cinch them tight. You could quite easily bodge job the same thing on any bag, I think, with dental floss or similar thread. You could add a blob of seamgrip between the strap and the bag before threading the needle to add a bit more durability and waterproofing.

Post edited at 10:11
Tricadam on 11 Mar 2018
In reply to Pete Houghton:

That's a good idea, Pete. May do just that. I too have an old Guide 35+ kicking about. As you say, great bag. Sadly though I have succumbed to the wonderfully fast and light ways of the Patagonia Ascensionist 35+. I still miss the full length zip for accessing items at the bottom of the sack though. Such a great feature! 

James Jackson on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

I have yet to find 'the perfect pack' for ski mountaineering, and always find myself modifying stuff.  The climbing ones aren't great for ski carrying, and the skiing ones aren't great for mountaineering.  I'm currently using an Osprey Kode 32, which is pretty good but I have had to add some gear loops and a second axe loop.  I find by really being ruthless on what kit I take I can fit a day of ski mountaineering kit (including harness, some gear, and a rope over the top of the pack) in it. It's tight though!

In terms of edges rubbing; I make sure the skis are cinched well back.  Maybe you could improvise with a loop of bungee cord running around one ski, around the pack, and to the second ski?  Or a spare strap with a clip could be sewn on to the pack for this purpose?

I've never had issued with edges rubbing my jacket, just cutting through the pack material through repeatedly putting them on / taking them off the pack.  I sewed on some thicker material at hot spots to counter this.

Post edited at 08:42
Dave - on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to James Jackson:

> I have yet to find 'the perfect pack' for ski mountaineering, and always find myself modifying stuff. 

Look at an Exped Serac 35, but only if you are into reasonably minimalist gear. Recently got one and been very pleased with it - only needed some minor bits removing and shortening a few straps.

Tricadam on 12 Mar 2018
In reply to James Jackson:

Thanks James. I think one of the problems is that the skis are strapped to the bag when it's relatively empty, i.e. on the climb when all the climbing kit is out of the bag! The lack of bag structure then makes it easy for things to move around. Might pop the wee back frame back in to see if that helps.

And avoiding routes that involve any form of squirming might help!

rocksol - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

I also find A frame unstable and a problem. Last year descending Midi arête the tails dug in lifting me off my feet. Luckily I caught the ropes on way way past! I now strap skis together and fasten them vertically to the middle of my sack. Sack is Deuter tour sack. Very secure and no probs.

Tricadam on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to rocksol:

> I also find A frame unstable and a problem. Last year descending Midi arête the tails dug in lifting me off my feet.

Oops, that sounds rather unnerving! I regretted not having my mini crampons for that walk. Icy neve and plastic soles is a bad combo.

Re Deuter, have just collected my old Guide 35+ so I can try that. I think the stiffer back will help keep things stable when climbing with A frame and a virtually empty sack. Doesn't half weigh a ton, but I'd happily be lowered off a bridge in it! 

Post edited at 18:10
kevin stephens - on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

I've got a Deuter Guide 32+ and the A frame carrying system works well

I've also got a Mammut Snowpulse ABS pack which has a diagonal carrying system on the back, these keeps the skis out of the way more than A frame

James Jackson on 13 Mar 2018
In reply to rocksol:

Conversely, I really like A-frame carry, especially when climbing. Horses for courses.

I think a macro point is that no matter how it's done, having 2m of rock-finding, wind-catching, neve-holding planks on one's back is always going to cause some issue!

Tricadam on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to kevin stephens:

> I've got a Deuter Guide 32+ and the A frame carrying system works well

> I've also got a Mammut Snowpulse ABS pack which has a diagonal carrying system on the back, these keeps the skis out of the way more than A frame

When not climbing I prefer the diagonal carry for its convenience but I can't imagine climbing ice in said mode!

Tricadam on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to James Jackson:

> Conversely, I really like A-frame carry, especially when climbing. Horses for courses.

> I think a macro point is that no matter how it's done, having 2m of rock-finding, wind-catching, neve-holding planks on one's back is always going to cause some issue!

James, you've got the Cham 2.0 107s haven't you? Can imagine a Cairngorm gust could get you airborne! My 107s finally had the opportunity to gobble some powder in Switzerland recently. Absolutely fantastic skis. Am going to stick to the Superguide 95s for the ice climbing though! 

James Jackson on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

Yep, I really really rate them - excellent edge hold on icy stuff, and really fun on everything else. Super-manoeuvrable in tight spaces too. For such a fun ski, I'm happy to just get fitter on the way up in order to enjoy the down so much. But then again, my aim isn't to do long tours (although they sometimes happen serendipidously, like an accidental 30-ish km loop on a phenomenal blue sky day two years ago, when we just carried on chasing the next summit / gully), rather to ski fun downhill stuff. Thankfully, when I've been in blasting Cairngorm weather they've been on my feet, not my back!

ed woods - on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

If the rubbing is happening to your lower back/above the hips from skis slipping towards your jacket from their position in lower of the side straps... Connect the heel units of your bindings across the front of the bag with a strap or cord to pull the skis back? Though this may have the downside of bringing the skis closer to knocking your helmet.

Tricadam on 14 Mar 2018
In reply to ed woods:

Thanks Ed, really good suggestion. It's more at the top actually but can apply your solution there instead. 


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