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Ropes recommended for Drytooling

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 Raymond Toy 21 Feb 2022

Hi all,

New to Drytooling, 

What good quality ropes would you recommend for Drytooling (top roping first and when more experienced  leading).

Mainly in quarries for use. 

Any guidance and advice, very much appreciated. 

Many thanks. 

Post edited at 21:57
 Rob Exile Ward 22 Feb 2022
In reply to Raymond Toy:

Sisal

 mmmhumous 22 Feb 2022
In reply to Raymond Toy:

Hi Raymond,

I saw your original post yesterday before it got edited/deleted, so a couple bits of advice and questions on what you'd originally posted...

You don't need a dry-tooling specific rope. For easier top-roping and leading, a standard single rope is fine.  As a lot of the tooling venues are on less than pristine rock, at thicker rope is probably a good shout.

For ice climbing and mixed winter climbing, it's a different story.  You Ideally want fully dry-treated ropes.  What sort of rope (single / half / twins) depends on the situation, but I use 2x60m triples for flexibility.

For dry-tooling, assuming you'll be wearing crampons, you're best off learning on top-rope rather than low traverses or boulder problems. This is because falls can be unexpected and even a short ground fall can easily trash your ankles while wearing crampons.

Also while there's a lot of overlap between dry-tooling and ice-climbing, there are some differences too.  So if it is ice-climbing you're really looking to get into, it's well worth a visit to either the Ice-factor in Kinlochleven or the Snow-factor in Glasgow (or given where you're based, flying to Norway for a trip/course). Closer to you, there's also the Ice wall in Covent Garden, but having been to the sister ice wall in Manchester, I wouldn't recommend it.  

OP Raymond Toy 22 Feb 2022
In reply to mmmhumous:

Hi and many thanks for the reply.

I appreciate it very much 😊👍

You are correct that I deleted the original post as I think I'm correct, that Drytooling can be a emotive subject - I'm aware to keep well away from climbing routes and fortune to have access to some disused quarries!!!

Many thanks for advice regarding the low level traverses and fortunately there is soft ground underneath and not rocks!!!

Thought about having a go with the tools and climbing shoes too!!! 

Really appreciate the guidance and advice.

Any recommendations for the top roping /leading ropes are most welcome and appreciated too. 

Many thanks,

Ray. 

Post edited at 17:36
In reply to Raymond Toy:

Just get into it, it will change your life and start your journey to enlightenment   soon you will be selling your rock shoes in favour of fruit boots! As far as rope is concerned,  something hard-wearing that can take some abuse would be good, when tooling your kit does tend to get covered in cave juice 

1
OP Raymond Toy 22 Feb 2022
In reply to climber34neil:

Many thanks for the reply and words of encouragement!!😊

I do have La sportiva napal extreme boots and Petzl Dart crampons at the moment. 

Many thanks, 

Ray. 

In reply to Raymond Toy:

Also its worth joining the fa e book groups for tooling,  masson lees dry tooling, white goods dry tooling,  dry tooling at the works and people's dry tooling community,  loads of helpful people on there and all totally psyched for it.

OP Raymond Toy 22 Feb 2022
In reply to climber34neil:

Again many thanks for all the information.

With myself being a beginner with using tools and crampons /Drytooling - it's a great help 😊

I did climb here in Cornwall for about 4 years but that was nearly 20 years ago!!

Many thanks again,

Ray. 

In reply to Raymond Toy:

If it's a top rope that's belayed from below, then borrow a semi-static (abseil/caving) from someone, but don't wallop it with a tool!

In reply to Raymond Toy:

Most UK drytool crags are wet and dirty. Any thick (around 9.5mm) and cheap single rope will do, and take a tubby or rope tarp to try and keep them out of the mud as much as possible. I have some old ropes which I use for tooling so I can keep my better quality ones fresh for longer. 

Decathalon have some good value ropes at the moment. 

Post edited at 10:16
 Offwidth 23 Feb 2022
In reply to CantClimbTom:

The system needs to be able to absorb a shock load if anything goes wrong (more likely belaying on a stiff rope). A thicker climbing rope is a much safer option.

OP Raymond Toy 23 Feb 2022
In reply to Offwidth:

Many thanks to all for your replies and guidance.

Very much appreciated 😊👍

As I have yet to purchase a rope, I'm looking for a good quality one and have been looking at the Beal TIGER 10MM.

Many thanks, 

Ray. 

Post edited at 12:44
In reply to Offwidth:

If it's a top rope belayed from below, there's a lot of rope in play (2 x height at the start and 1 x height when touching the top). Hopefully the fall would be small in a top rope scenario and absorbed by a lot of rope. Personally I like semi static for that, but each to their own.

Also maybe just me, but my statics get dragged through mucky wet mines etc, and go through washing machine quite frequently (30deg quick wash no detergent) so I'm not ultra precious about them like dynamics

 Offwidth 23 Feb 2022
In reply to CantClimbTom:

Lets say for some reason you end up with a couple of metres of slack. Do a calculation on the potential shock load on a top-roped climber fall. 'Static' ropes are often explicitly stated not to be used for any top-roping by manufacturers. It's worse for dry tooling as on the generally overhanging venues if you have a tight rope you would be more likely to pull the climber off the rock.

Post edited at 14:00
5
 Jamie Wakeham 24 Feb 2022
In reply to Offwidth:

Which manufacturers say this, Offwidth?  Using semi-static rope for top roping (bottom roping if we're being pedantic) is standard practice on lots of climbing walls.

A worst case scenario might be a 2m fall (which would take some pretty poor belaying) at the top of a 10m route.  That would be a FF of 0.17 which is very minor.  Even if the semi static imparts twice the impact force that a dynamic rope would - probably an over-estimate - then it's not an issue. 

I'd have thought that a semi static would be exactly what the OP needs for now - it's going to get hammered in filthy quarries - and actually the reduced stretch is a good thing whilst falling with pointy things.  They just need to recognise that they can never lead on it.

 Offwidth 24 Feb 2022
In reply to Jamie Wakeham:

My point was for 'static' ropes. On the specific semi-static designation maybe show me a manufacturer who recommends it for a top-rope. Unless I'm missing something, specific indoor top-rope designs are just thick and less stretchy dynamic ropes with better wear quality. The designated semi static ropes I've seen are only recommended for activities like canyoning, caving and abseiling.

Please also remember this is a thread for someone new to the activity. 

Post edited at 11:15
2
OP Raymond Toy 24 Feb 2022
In reply to Offwidth:

Hi all,

Many thanks for all your replies and I'm very grateful to you all 😊👍

Although I'm a total beginner of the Drytooling, I climbed regularly for just over 4 years, but that was 20 years ago!!!

So it's the case of getting my head around things again but with a new way for me climbing / learning .

I have decided to go with the Beal TIGER 10MM because I do plan to lead when I get the fundamentals in place and more experienced.

I shall keep a eye out for any training /learning workshops that are advertised.

Many thanks,

Ray. 

In reply to Raymond Toy:

Come and.visit the cave of dreams (masson lees) get in touch  a d we will come out and meet you 

OP Raymond Toy 25 Feb 2022
In reply to climber34neil:

Wow, that's a very kind offer and I'm very grateful 😊👍

I have a little campervan so that would be the accommodation sorted 😊

Post edited at 09:25
 Jamie Wakeham 25 Feb 2022
In reply to Offwidth:

> Please also remember this is a thread for someone new to the activity. 

I specialise in teaching novices professionally.  That's why I am being deliberately precise with my language - the ropes we're talking about are semi-static, conforming to EN1891.  There isn't really any definition of 'static' ropes.  There are 'ultra low stretch' lines (such as Beal's 5mm Back-Up Line) but you wouldn't think of them as ropes as such.

Use of semi-static ropes for top ropes is common in climbing walls - some might still be using chunky dynamic ropes, but my local walls have certainly switched to semi-static for this purpose.  The standard requires a FF0.3 drop with 100kg, resulting in less than 6kN impact force, so they are all somewhat dynamic.

The popular semi-static rope is Beal's Antipodes, and they only say that it must never be used in a  situation with a FF greater than 1 (!) so it's fine for bottom roping.  A few places also sell Edelrid Performance Static, and they simply say that it must not be used for lead climbing.

OP: a Beal Tiger is a good shout if you want a dynamic rope for this.  You might (if you haven't already bought it) also consider the Beal Apollo, which they market as a super tough dynamic rope.  It's a bit heavier though.

 Cobra_Head 25 Feb 2022
In reply to Raymond Toy:

I recommend 20 -30 minutes of Barry White, always sorts my dry-tooling issues out.

OP Raymond Toy 26 Feb 2022
In reply to Jamie Wakeham:

Hi and I appreciate all the advice and guidance from you all 😊👍

I am now the proud owner of the Beal TIGER 10MM -

So looking forward to the steep learning curve 😊👍

All the very best, 

Ray. 

OP Raymond Toy 26 Feb 2022
In reply to Cobra_Head:

Really like that one!! 😂

Thanks 😊👍


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