/ Ski Boots - time to replace ?

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Chris the Tall - on 14 Nov 2016
My ski boots are now over 10 years old and the liners are trashed - do I try and get new liners or replace with new boots ?

Has boot tech changed much in last 10 years ?
How long should a pair last ?

The boots have never been super comfy, but various tinkering over the time frame have made them bearable. The fear of going back to stage 1 and having to get a new pair right is partly why I'm reluctant to change

HammondR on 14 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:
You need some new ones, you know you do. In view of the fact that they have never been comfortable to start with, what do you have to lose (apart from a few quid).

You have the opportunity to get boots that fit you really well. I got my first pair of custom fitted boots 3 years ago, and it was one of my best value for money purchases. It doesn't come cheap, but if you ski a lot, it is worth every penny. Try Colin at Solutions4 Feet in Biscester. It is a long way to travel, but he is one of the best in the U.K. I went there for both my Alpine and touring boots. I find that skiing is hard enough without having to put up with uncomfortable feet.

It is a bit of a trail from Halifax, but if I buy any in the U.K. In the future, it will be from him. Are you visiting Chamonix this winter? If you are, Sole Boot Lab and Sanglard have both done fantastic fitting jobs for my (grown up) children.

Hope this helps.
Post edited at 11:41
Andysomething - on 14 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

This thread had some relevant comments
http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=650354&v=1#x8397770

I can't really answer your points directly. I'm into my 11th year and about 18th week on a pair of boots I bought and had fitted by Profeet. The liners were foam injection and they are holding up well, the shells are still ok, I fitted some replacement soles and heels about 4 years back to ensure I wasn't cammed over at all as they wear on the outer edges. I think these boots are good for at least another five weeks or three years.

Depends on your budget. If it were me I'd probably bite the bullet and fork out again for a new pair fitted again by Profeet. It's expensive but the cost over 20 weeks works out at maybe about £20 a week which is competitive with boot hire (which is a poor option anyway). A more economical option might be to keep the shells and have a foam liner fitted though.
Andysomething - on 14 Nov 2016
In reply to HammondR:

Plus one for that!
top cat on 14 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

Get second hand with a mouldable liner which you can fit to your feet. My most comfortable boot ever [and I have had hundreds over the past 40 years] was bought off ebay for a song ............
aligibb - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

get some new boots!
CathS - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

If the boots 'have never been super comfy' and the liners are trashed, then you should go for completely new boots and get them properly fitted in the process. There's not much saving to be made from just replacing the liners, and if the shells are the wrong size/shape to start with then it's a completely false economy.

A well-fitting pair should be more or less right from the start and not require a significant period of breaking in.

If you are based in the north of England, I would highly recommend the bootfitters at Rivington Alpine near Bolton. The deal includes free post-fitting adjustments if needed.
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aligibb - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

Alain Baxter does a great fitting job up in Scotland if you live up that way.
kevin stephens - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to CathS:

seconded re Rivington Alpine
TRip - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

It sounds like you need new boots.

Are you still in Sheffield Chris? I'd head to Backcountry UK in Ilkley.

Phil knows he stuff and will do a fantastic job.
kevin stephens - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to TRip:

Backcountry UK and Rivington Alpine are the best 2 options in North of England, Backcountry UK tends to specialise more in touring/free ride boots - I'd give them both a ring to see which is the best for you
HeMa on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> My ski boots are now over 10 years old and the liners are trashed - do I try and get new liners or replace with new boots ?

Depends, on theboots you have, how good of a skier you really and how often you ski.

> Has boot tech changed much in last 10 years?

Yes.

> How long should a pair last?

Depends on use, liners generally pack out in 2 to 5 years for and avid skier (10 to 50 days per year). Boot backing and touring wear out the liner quicker than just pure skiing.

> The boots have never been super comfy, but various tinkering over the time frame have made them bearable. The fear of going back to stage 1 and having to get a new pair right is partly why I'm reluctant to change.

Get new boots, and start with a pair that fits (shell fit) and heatmoldable liners. Oh, and these Freeride boots are something to consider as well. Walking switch and nice (partial) vibram sole make life a lot nicer, even if you never venture in the back country... Unless professional super G is your thing, in which case why an earth are you asking such a question to beging with.

Chris the Tall - on 04 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris the Tall:

Always a bit bizarre when a dormant thread bursts back into life, but thanks for all the advice.

Have booked myself in with Rivington Alpine - it's a bit of a drive from Sheffield but it's en-route to my parents in the fylde, so not too bad

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