/ Climbing at indoor wall in mountaineering boots

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FreeloaderJoe - on 06 Jan 2017
Hello all,

I have a longterm injury in my big toe which makes rock boots a nono. I have no trouble climbing in my B3's though, and would like to run up and down some easy routes on an auto belay as some summer prep and fitness work.

Apart from a few funny looks. Do you think this would be frowned upon at an indoor wall? Has anyone done this before?
1
sheppy on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Think that would be frowned on, training shoe or a bigger sized hire shoe might be better option.
17
Greasy Prusiks on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I'd be surprised if anyone minded.

Why not message the wall and ask them?
BenedictIEP on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Have you tried/considered a fairly 'techie' pair of approach shoes? The instructors at most walls I go to usually climb in them so shouldn't be a problem.
FreeloaderJoe - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to BenedictIEP:

I need a completely rigid sole, that is the issue.
jonathandavey - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Can't imagine it would be an issue, as long as they aren't leaving mud or dirt on the holds. Most walls have a steady stream of beginners in trainers, can't see how this would be any different.
joeldering on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

What about doing some repeaters on the fingerboard, or foot on campusing (maybe with a small stool to stand on?) for the fingers/arms & some step ups or squats for the cardio/legs?
ChrisBrooke - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Can't imagine it being a problem at all if they're clean. My mates usually climb in big boots for a couple of weeks before a trip, rucksacks on for extra indoor gnarl
Vector686 on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to sheppy:

> Think that would be frowned on, training shoe or a bigger sized hire shoe might be better option.

Not likely
JackM92 - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I know a number of guys who have climbed indoors in boots, if the staff have got an issue with it then I'm sure explaining that you're unable to wear a climbing shoe and require good support would settle and issues.

It's no different to people climbing in trainers!
trish1968 - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I've done it a couple of times in big boots prior to ice climbing trips.
The staff were fine with it but you do get funny looks from other people.
teh_mark on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I've done it before, no issues. I'd be very surprised (and a bit miffed) if the wall asked me to stop, as long as I wasn't leaving mud everywhere.
deepsoup - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:
It might pre-empt problems to take them there, clean, in a bag rather than to be wearing them when you walk in the door.
planetmarshall on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

> Apart from a few funny looks. Do you think this would be frowned upon at an indoor wall? Has anyone done this before?

I got thrown out of a wall for doing this.


I hadn't taken the crampons off though, so maybe that was it...

zimpara - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I sprained my ankle just before I went to Chamonix, and climbed indoors a few times in B2s. No one cares. They are more interested in what you are doing.
cezza - on 06 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Have had 20+ people using big boots at an indoor wall for some MR rope rescue training without complaints.
(We did ask nicely first!)

Cezza
Patrick Roman - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

I was once asked by the manager at Glasgow's Kelvin Hall not to wear my B3s as he felt the edges of the rigid sole might tear the crash pads they had at the bottom of the wall (it was a bouldering venue). Wouldn't have thought it would be an issue without the pads though.
don macb on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

i got shouted at by a local wall manager a few years ago for climbing easy jug routes in scarpa zen approach shoes. health and safety issue, he reckoned...

i couldn't be arsed to argue. looking back, i think i probably should have.
sam.sam.sam.ferguson - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Where are you based? I work at a wall and we would have no problems with it. As long as your not barefoot and there not dirty it's all good.

Would be surprised if any wall didn't allow it. As mentioned before no different to beginners in their trainers.
Ron Rees Davies - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to sam.sam.sam.ferguson:

Why not barefoot? You presumably don't insist on wearing gloves.
2
gethin_allen on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

> Why not barefoot? You presumably don't insist on wearing gloves.

Surely this is obvious,
1
johncook - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Ask your local walls. They are the ones who can answer this.
P.s I don't think they will let you use crampons!
deepsoup - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:
I can tell from your profile pic that you have beautiful well cared for feet, so you may not know this: a lot of people's feet are absolutely minging!
Timmd on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

> Why not barefoot? You presumably don't insist on wearing gloves.

Verrucas, athlete's foot, 'fungus', general foot sweat.
Wayne S - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

Can't see any wall worth their salt finding climbing in mountaineering boots an issue. Quite illuminating doing harder stuff in them, ie awsome for edging, rubbish at smears mind!
sam.sam.sam.ferguson - on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

Seems other people got their first.

As well as being a bit disgusting you can quite easily hurt your feet climbing barefoot - if you need any proof give it a go ;)
JEF on 07 Jan 2017
In reply to Timmd:

> Verrucas, athlete's foot, 'fungus', general foot sweat.

At our local swimming pool everyone has to wear wellies because of this. Carnage in the deep end!
Ron Rees Davies - on 08 Jan 2017
> Verrucas, athlete's foot, 'fungus', general foot sweat.

Problem here is that this is a self fulfilling argument - most of these conditions exist because of people keeping their feet cooped up in tight sweaty footwear. Go barefoot and these problems disappear.

> you can quite easily hurt your feet climbing barefoot - if you need any proof give it a go ;)

I've climbed several VDiffs barefoot, along with 2x 3000ft peaks. Its refreshing. Don't knock it till you've tried it!

I'm not suggesting that barefoot is the way to push grades, or even a sensible way of regular training, just that automatically banning barefoot climbing while allowing climbing with sweaty, greasy hands with flappers and grazed knuckles is illogical.
1
rgold - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to FreeloaderJoe:

You can make a pair of trainers or climbing shoes (sized a tad bigger) pretty damn stiff by cutting an insole out of a cookie sheet and inserting it in your shoe. A possible downside is strange noises emanating from your shoe as the cookie sheet flexes ever so slightly.
galpinos on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to sam.sam.sam.ferguson:

It might hurt your feet, or you might climb Font 8c......

http://www.ukclimbing.com/videos/play.php?i=2967
elliott92 - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

Yeah you are right. But feet creep me out. If some dude climbs and indoor route with bare feet I shall avoid said route like it has Ebola. Feet are strange weird things. Did I mention that feet creep me out?
Timmd on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

> Problem here is that this is a self fulfilling argument - most of these conditions exist because of people keeping their feet cooped up in tight sweaty footwear. Go barefoot and these problems disappear.

That's hardly a reason for putting your minging feet on the climbing wall holds other peoples' hands will be on though.

> I'm not suggesting that barefoot is the way to push grades, or even a sensible way of regular training, just that automatically banning barefoot climbing while allowing climbing with sweaty, greasy hands with flappers and grazed knuckles is illogical.

Are you going to try and convince your local wall?
zimpara - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:


> I'm not suggesting that barefoot is the way to push grades

Wait now what... If I climb 6c in boots, what are the possibilities barefoot???

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