/ Really expensive/stupid but valid sleeping bag question

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
zimpara - on 08 Jan 2017

I have a mountain equipment Titan 425 down bag.
If I cut it in half, add the down from the top half into the bottom baffles equally and sew it back up,
does that make it a 425g fill weight half sleeping bag and can anybody quantify what temperature, if you have a perfect seal,jacket, hood, mitts etc this half bag would probably be rated for?
Post edited at 22:56
16
The New NickB - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

a) You will make a mess of it;

b) It rather depends on the fill of the jacket, which is where the heat loss is; and

c) The old Pied D'Elephant concept is actually pretty inefficient thermally.
1
Dr.S at work - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

could you perhaps you tube this?
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

The bag would be rated 'Childs'
NathanP - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

I have a mountain equipment Titan 425 down bag.
If I cut it in half, add the down from the top half into the bottom baffles equally and sew it back up, does that make it a 425g fill weight half sleeping bag
- No

and can anybody quantify what temperature, if you have a perfect seal,jacket, hood, mitts etc this half bag would probably be rated for?
- No

Hope that helps.
marsbar - on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

If you really want to you could sleep under it instead of in it. If that sounds like a ridiculous idea, remember you were suggesting cutting it up.
gethin_allen on 08 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

Getting down in and out of a sleeping bag shell is really really difficult. I added about 200g of down to a sleeping bag that was looking a bit sad by unpicking a seam near the zip (guessing from the look of it that was where the original down went in). There was down everywhere until I wired the method using plastic tubes, bits of muzzlin cloth and the Dyson. It's probably less effort and time to get another job and buy a posh sleeping bag.
1
zimpara - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to gethin_allen:

Would wetting the down make it more manageable?
4
Shortshorts on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:
It'd be incredibly hard to do. But by overstuffing sleeping bags you can increase temp ratings by up to about 6 degrees. After that you can keep stuffing down, but it'll be to no effect since the limiting factor becomes the size of the baffles (meaning the down can't expand and trap air).
Post edited at 00:52
Dave Perry - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

It seems a pointless way of wasting your money. You'll just make a mess. Do u even have a sewing machine?
Wingnut - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to gethin_allen:

Sounds familiar. I once had a go at making my own down vest, and yes, the down went everywhere. Having my parents' cat attempt to get in on the action didn't exactly help either.

I still have the vest, mind.
Sir Chasm - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

Ignore all these pessimists, as long as you're handy with a needle and thread you'll be fine.
tingle - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

Im a big fan of your posts. If you are actually seriously wanting a warm bag then user i think named "kirsten" was selling a great PHD for £200 if you search the for sale forum you might find it and she might still have it. Would have got it myself but i dont dream quite as big as you yet. Good luck
MG - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

> Would wetting the down make it more manageable?

Definitely. The best approach to cutting up sleeping bags is to do it in the shower.
gethin_allen on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

> Would wetting the down make it more manageable?

Maybe, but that would make it more difficult to share it out evenly between the baffles when filling because of the changes in weight.
oldie - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

Would it be easier to just roll the upper end of the bag inside out back towards the foot end and pull the hood drawstrings tight?
This way there would be little excessive compression of down since the original head end is wider than the foot of a mummy shape. Of course there would be no weight saving regarding amount of fabric.
I believe thicker bags can sometimes have a problem with sweat water condensation in the outer cool parts when conditions are cold; a vapour barrier could be simply inserted if necessary. At least the down is moisture resistant in the Titan.
I'm not sure what the intended purpose of such a bag would be since, as pointed out, the pied d'elephant system is mentioned much nowadays.
Timmd on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:
If you can find £75 you could buy an Alpkit half bag and not ruin your expensive sleeping bag.

hth
Post edited at 12:17
JayPee630 - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:

> I have a mountain equipment Titan 425 down bag.

> If I cut it in half, add the down from the top half into the bottom baffles equally and sew it back up,

> does that make it a 425g fill weight half sleeping bag and can anybody quantify what temperature, if you have a perfect seal,jacket, hood, mitts etc this half bag would probably be rated for?


As questions asked on this forum this one of yours is pretty close to the top of the list of most hilariously idiotic. I'm really starting to think you're an elaborate spoof on here.
wbo - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara: Do you mean the top when you're standing up or when you're lying down?

JayPee630 - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to wbo:

He means the top, but the top when you roll over but then stand up on your side.
Dorchester on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:
Are you a dwarf? If so this is a great idea.
galpinos on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to zimpara:
The capacity of warmth of the down is dictated by quantity of down AND that down's ability to loft. The baffles will be too small for all the extra down so there might be an increase in warmth but not as much as expected. You'll probably loose half the down trying to do it so maybe it'll work......

As pother's have said, either buy a cheap pied d' elephant from Alpkit, an expensive one from Patagonia or some belay trousers, like the wads wear (warm enough to bivy, you can climb through the night, wear them on the descent when you'r cream crackered and moving slowly etc)
Post edited at 13:56
ads.ukclimbing.com
andrewmc - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to galpinos:

or, as someone suggested earlier, sleep under it...

Actually if you really, really want to, just sew an extra layer onto the bottom of the bag. That way you can either get into the sleeping bag or get snugly under it. Make it big enough to get a sleeping mat in and you basically have one of those Thermarest arrangements.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.