/ Recovery times after running

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paul walters - on 09 Jan 2017
I've just got back to running after a 12-month injury-enforced lay-off. Did a slow 20min run on Saturday evening, had the usual slight soreness after it, which eased off... until around 7pm sunday night, when I had prolonged and painful cramp spasms in my right hamstring. Calve and quads also then began aching, and made moving around quite awkward.
I'm planning on a trip to Kilimanjaro in late August/September, so need to build up some strength and stamina over the next few months, so really need a workable strategy for improving recovery between runs/cycle/hill walks.
Anyone got any advice please ?
Cheers
Paul
Mountain Llama on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

Hi Paul

I am no mega runner but like yourself I am returning from injury. These are the things I do;
>Make sure I warm up by taking it easy for the 1st 10 mins
>Make sure I am hydrated
>Make sure your shoes are OK
>Run off road to lower impact
>Cool down at the end, I walk for 2 to 5 mins
>Stretch at end of run and every day
>mix ruining up with MTB and walking sessions

HTH Davey
DancingOnRock - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

'Usual slight soreness'?

After a 'slow' run?

What do you mean? Are you sure it was very slow? If you've had 12months off you'd want to be running extremely slowly. Starting straight back with 4-5km run isn't going to be the best approach.
5
Simon2005 on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:
Agree with Mountain Llama but I would add give your problem muscles a good massage before and after. Go slow and short and build up slowly. I've seen so many runners (me included) rush the return process and end up out of action for even longer. If the legs are telling you something then listen.
Post edited at 13:34
RX-78 on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

when I returned to running (twice) after running injuries the last time I took it really easy and did run/walk first and only for a few km, built up really slowly and got back to normal eventually. 20min run after 12month layoff sounds too much.
Webster - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

sounds like a case of the DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness). perfectly normal after exercise for some people (I usually ache the most on the 2nd day after going to the gym!). things should improve the more you get back into it, and it can seam counter intuitive, but the more often you train the less you will ache as your body adjusts to the new 'norm'. if I hit the gym 2-3 times a week then ache is usually minimal, but when I am only going once every wekk or 2 then 2-3 days of stiffness is inevitable!
paul walters - on 10 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

Thanks all for taking the time to reply... as I said, my first run was 20mins, and at most 3km, along a flat course. In 2015 I was running 2-3 nights a week, usually 6km, with at least one 10km session. It took me about 12 months to get to that level, starting with the run-walk regime, and building up over about 3 months to longer and longer runs. In addition to that, I was putting in some solid miles on my road bike, including some longer sportives, and at least one century ride... unfortunately, by the end of 2015 I was in considerable pain in both knees, so was forced to stop. It's only over the past couple of months that the pain has receded, and I now feel confident in starting again.

I'm aware that I don't want to risk re-injury, so have made the effort to start slowly... but obviously not slowly enough. Bah.

Thanks again for the replies.
jondo - on 10 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

drinking a protein shake shortly after may help.
hydrating properly before and during running.
i do some stretching, but a day after actually, contrary to some usual practices which is right after.
DancingOnRock - on 10 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:
Have you had a proper diagnosis for your knees? There are loads of sports physios around and unless you know the root cause you're just going to repeat what you were doing before and get a reoccurrence of the injury. You may just need custom insterts for your shoes.

Also, those are relatively short distances so it's unlikely that your injury has been caused by overuse unless you are smashing out those distances at full speed every time.

Slow down. Do 80-90% of your running at 'Easy' Pace. If you can't hold a conversation you are going too fast.
Post edited at 11:39
paul walters - on 10 Jan 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock:

Hi DOR, I've been to various private and NHS physios since November 2015 when the condition became acute, but although I know I have a hyper-extension, I have never had a proper diagnosis of the injury. I was referred by my local NHS physio to the Central Mobility Centre (who deal with amputees etc) for shoe inserts, but after an assessment there (and after waiting 24 weeks for an appointment), I was prescribed knee braces (which I already had)..... I was flabbergasted by it all.... I went back to the local physio (whom I have some respect for), and was advised to go private.

I am currently saving up enough money for a referral to a place in Exeter what specialises in knee/ankle injuries and works with The Royal Marines....

The latest cramps etc are muscular rather than skeletal I think, and the pain is certainly different.

I'm going to try another short/slow run tonight and see how it pans out.

Cheers

Paul
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SouthernSteve on 10 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

I think you went a bit mad just going for that first run (11 min miles) , hopefully you've learned a lesson and not done too much damage, I think the next few weeks might be a bit boring, but if you want to run worth it. Increase your weekly walking miles as well if you can as a supplement/cross training

Try a return to running regime such as
http://www.kinetic-revolution.com/running-technique-transition-program/

If your age is accurate on your profile then do at least a couple of days a week of strength and conditioning exercises, concentrating initially on your core and glutes as well as balance. Consider joining an internet group such as Bulletproof runners if you need nagging.

HTH and good luck. Steve
Scarab9 - on 11 Jan 2017
In reply to DancingOnRock:

> 'Usual slight soreness'?

> After a 'slow' run?

> What do you mean? Are you sure it was very slow? If you've had 12months off you'd want to be running extremely slowly. Starting straight back with 4-5km run isn't going to be the best approach.

Not sure why this got 3 dislikes. its true!
Take it really easy the first couple of weeks. I had some off time of a years or so and anytime I tried to restart I'd be broken for a several days after. Eventually I realised was expecting too much. Started v slow running(with some walk) 2k three times a week for about 3weeks (probably just twice first week) then found I could run an alright pace for that. The it picked up quicker from there, but that slow first bit was vital.

You wouldn't expect a total beginner to run 20mins non stop and not be in pain!
dr_botnik - on 11 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

Sorry to hear about your knees and the physio fiasco.

I'm just coming back to running after a few months off, feels so hard, good effort for even trying.

One thing I've always found benefit from are those foam rollers. Doing all the soft tissue on your legs, gluten, etc is a good warm up, but I tend to walk for the first 5 minutes then (really) slowly up the pace. I remember reading somewhere that it takes about 10 minutes for your body to switch into "cardio" mode and about 20 minutes total before you clear the lactic acid. So aim for a 20 minute warm up, alternating between walking and light jogging. If you're worried about your running form add some knee raises/heel kicks.

As for recovery, I usually walk for the last 5-10 minutes and do a quick round of stretching (only about 3/4 stretches) and have some recovery food. Then I do a bigger round of stretching with more exercises before bed, with a bit more of the foam roller. This routine has been working for me so far (touch wood).

The only other thing I can think is less scientific, but my brother came up with it after a long lay off. He created a sort of pyramid training scheme, 4 weeks on, one week off. So for the first 4 weeks, he did one run. Then a week off. Then 2 runs each week for the next four weeks, followed by a week off, then 3 runs, week off, then 2 short and one long run. So it was sort of a 5 month training plan. Don't know if any of this has given you some ideas, it's just things I've tried in the past, best of luck getting your fitness back for kilimanjaro.
In reply to paul walters:
Good video here on foam rolling:
http://www.trailrunnermag.com/training/article/6-trail-tips/2379-foam-rolling-101
Post edited at 14:17
paul walters - on 11 Jan 2017
In reply to paul walters:

Some great ideas here. Thanks to all. Did another 20 min session last night on same route, but this time really taking my time; after 5 mins I did a 2 min walk, then ran for 5mins, then a walk, and run to finish to the house, before doing a short walk 2-3mins as a warm down.

My muscles were telling me I'd made an effort, but this morning, there are no side-effects at all.... night off tonight and tomorrow, then the weekly squash match on Friday (which never causes me any discomfort (apart from the embarrassment of losing to my wife ))

Paul

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