/ Can DSLR compete with mirrorless?

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The Lemming - on 09 Jan 2017
The ubiquitous smartphone has just about crushed all before it. It's not a master one but a competent Jack of all including cameras.

Now dSLRs are good but they are big, heavy and expensive. However mirrorless cameras, including micro four thirds, are lighter, smaller and cheaper.

What would dSLR manufacturers need to do to keep up with mirrorless cameras in all their form factors?
1
mrphilipoldham - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

As a professional sport photographer, it's the other way around. Mirrorless cameras need to have fast, faultless auto focus systems before I'd even contemplate looking at them. They need to feel like a tank also, as they'd be put through hell and high water.. not something I've come across as of yet.
AlanLittle - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

The flappy mirror as a concept is clearly on the way out. However, as an interim I just bought a Nikon D3300, which is a similar size & weight to most mirrorless systems and a lot cheaper.
The Lemming - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to mrphilipoldham:
> As a professional sport photographer, it's the other way around. Mirrorless cameras need to have fast, faultless auto focus systems before I'd even contemplate looking at them. They need to feel like a tank also, as they'd be put through hell and high water.. not something I've come across as of yet.

Any other features that put dSLR's ahead of a mirrorless camera because the gap is closing, and excuse the pun, fast.

It would seem that from what I've read and reviewed, only the flagship dSLR's can compete and beat a mirrorless camera. Not too many people can invest in a flagship camera with correspondingly expensive glass. Could the same be said for consumer/prosumer dSLR's?


This makes an interesting read http://www.techradar.com/news/photography-video-capture/cameras/mirrorless-vs-dslr-1304910
Post edited at 13:08
mrphilipoldham - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I'd wager not, and I'd love a decent compact setup that can do everything my current stuff can. The next couple of years will be interesting!
galpinos on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Which mirrorless cameras (including lenses) are cheaper than the equivalent spec dSLR?

(Genuine question, I'm in the market for something to complement the compact (Sony RX-100) but it still small enough to lug up a route.)
galpinos on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to AlanLittle:

Have you used it yet? Any feed back? Just had a quick google and it looks good.
In reply to The Lemming:

It's not really such a distinct 'us and them' gap. They've both advantages and disadvantages. Mirrorless will probably be the future but it's not quite there yet. There's lots of rumours that both Canon and Nikon will be producing full frame mirrorless cameras.

I'd worry far more about the lenses.

The biggest mirrorless contender to the pro / semi pro (medium format aside) Canon and Nikon DSLR's is the Sony Alpha a7 series. But whilst image quality is great they have a limited range of lenses particularly at the extreme telephoto end. The ergonomics are not as good as the Nikon D810 / Canon 5D IV. The battery life isn't as good and it's not as robust. The lighting systems are getting there but still don't really compete when you want to sync multiple speed lights and mono lights from various companies together.

The size and weight advantage of the a7 series is negated completely when you put a pro zoom on it (the 24-70 and 70-200 are both bigger than Canon / Nikon counterparts). Finally the Sony GM series is as, if not more expensive than the Canon / Nikon equivalents.

The more competition the better though and it's an exciting time for camera innovation.

Xharlie on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to James Rushforth:

Will these full-frame mirrorless cameras maintain compatibility with the EF lens mount (or F-mount, for Nikon), provider PROPER viewfinders and feature zero shutter lag?
Marek - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to James Rushforth:

> The size and weight advantage of the a7 series is negated completely when you put a pro zoom on it (the 24-70 and 70-200 are both bigger than Canon / Nikon counterparts).

It also worth bearing in mind that very wide-angle lenses are also more difficult to design (well) on mirrorless systems if you want to exploit the size advantage due to the increased light incidence angle at the edges of the sensor. It seems at the moment that mirrorless is good for 'walk-about' (or even 'climb-about') situations where you only need normal/shortish focal lengths (i.e., pancake lens). Other than that, there's little point.

There's also the durability issue (with mirrorless e-shutters) that the sensor is exposed when changing lenses. Big problem? I don't know, but dust (or worse) on sensors is never a good thing.

Sadly I suspect that marketing - rather than technical - issues will decide the future of the low-end interchangable lens camera.
euanryan on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I found this interesting reading, especially being a 5D user myself: http://alpineexposures.com/phototips/tips-from-the-pros-which-camera-gear
colinakmc - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Viewfinder.

No competition in bright sunlight or for moving subjects from CSC.

I like my Panasonic GF1 for its pocketability but it's not so good for actually framing your subject carefully.
AlanLittle - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to galpinos:

Just got it, nothing to report yet.

It's slightly bigger than my old Olympus 410 (4/3 DSLR) but very close to the same weight.Plan is to use it as a stopgap while I save up for a much more expensive Fuji X-T2, but we'll see.
jethro kiernan - on 09 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

If I was moving into apc format for the first time I would be looking at the fuji xt 2, as I am looking at moving up to full frame I will stick with nikon and hopefully a D810 due to lens a flash systems (and plain old brand loyalty) but when cash allows either a Olympus or panasonic mirror less for fast and light days out , I think the clock is ticking for Dslr in anything but a niche role.

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