/ 35mm film and Super 8.. For rich eccentrics?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
The Lemming - on 12 Jan 2017
Super 8 and 35mm film were great, back in the day.

But apart from a bit of geeky fun, would you really want to shoot Super 8, today?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bq1vP0viRO8
2
greg_may_ - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:
Because people enjoy it. I have, and still use, a 35mm film camera at the same time as my digital cameras. I've friends who still shoot Super8 and take part in film competitions like Straight8 - http://www.straight8.net/

To the point that he made a film about me of all people training for the Tour Divide earlier this year - https://www.vimeo.com/170663175

All shot on one roll, by bike, on one loop. Took 5.5 hrs to shoot 3mins of film though.

Just because you don't like it, doesn't make it unpopular.
Post edited at 13:52
Gordon Stainforth - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

You seem to have missed out 16mm, which for many years was the standard format for TV documentaries. And of course c. 99% of all movies were shot on 35mm. Super 8 was simply a fun amateur thing of very limited quality and use. Not much better than Standard 8. (I shot some early movies on both, but at film school it was all 16mm.)
1
The Lemming - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to greg_may_:


> Just because you don't like it, doesn't make it unpopular.

I just tried to start a topic for discussion.



1
krazykid009 - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I work in TV, and spent this summer as a member of the camera team on crazy head for E4. We shot it all on 35mm film, Kodak 5213 and 5219 for for those who know their stocks!

It's widely regarded as being better than digital for many reasons, including handling of dynamic range, skin tones, detail and just "the film look"
Jim C - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I have an exposed, but undeveloped Super 8 film of the kids ( they are now over 30)
It is in the prepaid envelope from Kodak, but for some reason was never posted.

However, apparently there is no longer the equipment in the UK to develop the odd roll of this stuff, so I guess that this film will never be seen. Unless the great UKC can help with suggestions?
simon c on 12 Jan 2017
Jim C - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to simon c:
Cheers Simon, this could be a great surprise for the kids,their mother & surviving grandparents

( Of course as I have 3 girls, and on previous experience of them, I will probably get a horrified response from one or more of them that they look 'fat' and will want the thing burned;)

Edit, reading this it seems they only sell and develop new film, and may not process my old stock, but I have asked the question, many thanks for the link.
Post edited at 23:50
purplemonkeyelephant - on 12 Jan 2017
In reply to krazykid009:

So how long after shooting it on film was it before you converted it to digital, edited it digitally and then broadcasted it digitally for people to watch on their digital HD screens?

paul__in_sheffield - on 13 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Must admit I've been thinking about picking up a 35mm Nikon again and buying some FP4 and HP5.
Really miss proper skin tones and all the other stuff that goes with b/w film, printing it yourself, and having to really think when you press the shutter release.
Tall Clare - on 13 Jan 2017
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

Do it do it do it!
y2keable - on 13 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I got into photography before the term "digital camera" had even been uttered. I do have a DSLR but it's a D80 that I paid about £700 for over 10 years ago, it mostly sits in my den gathering dust. I still prefer to use my F100 and a roll of Fuji Velvia. I love the dynamic range, the colour gamma, the silky smooth look and because I use a dedicated 35mm scanner, I can pull off enormous resolutions.

Take a look at my website, only about 5% of the photos in the gallery were taken with the D80, the rest are 35mm: http://jk-photo.co.uk

My flickr gallery has 0% digital photos: http://flickr.com/photos/shutterrust/galleries

To me, using a digital camera not only feels like cheating but I feel like I'm missing out on a magical process. I like the ritual of choosing and loading a film, I like the sound of the motor as it wind the film and I like taking the time to scan each individual frame.
greg_may_ - on 13 Jan 2017
In reply to Jim C:

There is a lab in London doing some - let me ask my mate and I'll get back to you!

I believe all the entries for the Straight8 comp were developed in Germany though.
greg_may_ - on 13 Jan 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

JimC - What sort of film stock is it?
ads.ukclimbing.com

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.