/ Double yellow lines

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afshapes - on 14 Jan 2017
Maybe if you park on double yellow lines you should forfeit your insurance so that you're only covered third party?
4
abseil on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

I don't know, that seems a bit drastic to me, if it's a big problem maybe increasing the penalties for parking on double yellow lines is the way forward.
Moley on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

Loading and unloading outside shops?
Blue badge holders?
Emergency vehicles - police, GP visiting, social services, meals on wheels and more?
Timmd on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Moley:

Maybe exempt those people?

stp - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

Eh? Seems a very strange suggestion. What if you're already only covered third party? I don't think the state could interfere anyway. Insurance is a private deal between you and your insurance company.

The main problem is there are too many cars on the roads which leaves us with a very inefficient transport system. Drivers sometimes bend the rules because of this. Better and cheaper public transport could go a long way to alleviating the problem. Unfortunately the government thinks of higher car ownership as a good thing, a metric of it's success, so until we get a more enlightened government, transport will be an ongoing frustrating experience.
Lion Bakes on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Timmd:

> Maybe exempt those people?

Allow meals on wheels to park on double yellow? Nah don't think so.
Timmd on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to stp:

> Eh? Seems a very strange suggestion. What if you're already only covered third party? I don't think the state could interfere anyway. Insurance is a private deal between you and your insurance company.

What if it turned out to be helpful because of deterring some people from parking on double yellow, would you change your mind about it being a bad thing that the state was involved (with third party staying third party)?
2
Dax H - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to stp:

>

> The main problem is there are too many cars on the roads which leaves us with a very inefficient transport system. Drivers sometimes bend the rules because of this. Better and cheaper public transport could go a long way to alleviating the problem.

This is what is needed, there are 2 bus companies in Leeds, a kid that used to work with me had to get 2 busses to work approximately 7 miles. The only route was 2 busses from 2 different companies both requiring a separate ticket.

Back in the late 80s I used public transport a lot, £20 a month for any bus or train, from Leeds I could go as far as Ilkley or York, I never went south or west but probably a similar distance.
At the time I was earning £45 a week as an apprentice so I think it was good value.

coinneach - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Dax H:

Parked on a double yellow in Alston this morning.

Got back 10 minutes later and had to fight through tumbleweed to get back in.
Jim C - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:
Down our way there are no resources for traffic wardens ( there are none at all ) and the police resources, such as they are, are concentrating on assaults shoplifting etc.

I'm on a Community Council, and I see the stats, there are never any for parking offences, despite the fact that the police attend meetings and we tell them where to look ( and even if you were blind you would STILL detect them - they park on the pavements)

Motorists can pretty much park anywhere, and not run a high risk/ any of prosecution/ penalty.( and they do)
Post edited at 19:00
spenser - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Moley:

Are the double yellows not there to signify that parking there is an inherently unsafe thing to do, either for you or other road users?
For some bizarre reason they've added two pairs of parking bays either side of a zebra crossing near my house so that you now can't see if anyone's waiting to cross on that side of the road until you're on top of the crossing! There used to be double yellows there, the first time someone gets hit on that crossing it'll go straight back to double yellows.
Dax H - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Jim C:

> Down our way there are no resources for traffic wardens ( there are none at all ) and the police resources, such as they are, are concentrating on assaults shoplifting etc.

> I'm on a Community Council, and I see the stats, there are never any for parking offences, despite the fact that the police attend meetings and we tell them where to look ( and even if you were blind you would STILL detect them - they park on the pavements)

> Motorists can pretty much park anywhere, and not run a high risk/ any of prosecution/ penalty.( and they do)

It could easily be self financing.
Illegal parking = tow the car and sell at auction to the highest bidder.
A lot of motorists think they have a divine right to park anywhere they like.
afshapes - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

I'm referring to those yellow lines where it's potential dangerous to park. ..on bends. .entrances and so on. Emergency services on blue lights would be exempt clearly as they are now.
Are you insured fully comp if you crash under the influence of alcohol ? If you don't disclose speeding endorsements doesn't that invalidate your insurance ?
Moley on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to spenser:

> Are the double yellows not there to signify that parking there is an inherently unsafe thing to do, either for you or other road users?

Also because parking in those areas there tends to cause serious congestion or access problems. With parking on both sides of a road ( think town centres here and small streets) it can block off access to emergency vehicles, like fire engines and if a lorry turns down a street and can't go further it is the start of chaos.

The big problem is working out who has to park there for a very short time and who is taking the piss. Unfortunately many motorists are the latter.

A few years ago all traffic wardens were removed from Aberystwyth (a political decision over who paid for them), without any enforcement mayhem ensued within weeks
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/road-and-rail-transport/8642177/Aberystwyth-The-town-without-...

And it was mayhem, we sometimes visited and what happened when motorists are given a free hand was very much jungle mentality, quite unbelievable.
Parking restrictions are there for a very good reason, but there have to be some allowances to them, the big problem is working out who, when, where and for how long some discretion is tolerated.
Hooo - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

It's pointless increasing the severity of the sentence if it's not enforced.
You could make people parking on double yellows get 2 years inside and it wouldn't change behaviour - because the chance of conviction is so low. On the other hand, a parking ticket is a sufficient deterent if the driver thinks there's a good chance of receiving one.
Jim C - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Dax H:

> It could easily be self financing.

> Illegal parking = tow the car and sell at auction to the highest bidder.

> A lot of motorists think they have a divine right to park anywhere they like.

I will suggest it to the councilors ( who I often see in the town, so they know what goes on;)

The ones that really pi@@ me the most are the young fit drivers, who bounce out of their car to walk just 3 yards to the chip shop blocking the road for everyone, rather than use the legal space less than 30 feet away.
stp - on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to Timmd:
> What if it turned out to be helpful because of deterring some people from parking on double yellow, would you change your mind about it being a bad thing that the state was involved (with third party staying third party)?

No. I definitely would not be in favour of the state intervening in private contracts between companies and individuals. That would be a huge step forward for authoritarianism and it's over such a trivial matter.

It also seems such a bizarre penalty. Why not just have bigger fines, or points on a driving licence if it's such a concern?

(Also it would only work one time. Once you're reduced to third party then you can park on double yellows with impunity. It's ridiculous.)
Post edited at 23:22
Timmd on 14 Jan 2017
In reply to stp:

You're right about it only working one time. Ta for answering, was just wondering.
afshapes - on 15 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

When I say forfeit your insurance I'm talking about in the event of a claim following an accident not a permanent adjustment as punishment. More a consequence of parking somewhere unsafe and causing an accident. It wouldn't need policing in the same way if you put a 6 ltr v8 in a Renault clio, didn't disclose the modification,crashed it then tried to claim. ...insurers wouldn't pay out.
Trangia on 15 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

> Maybe if you park on double yellow lines you should forfeit your insurance so that you're only covered third party?

Nah - tow them away and crush them. Just check first though that the kids and dog aren't in the car........
Martin W on 15 Jan 2017
In reply to Jim C:

> I'm on a Community Council, and I see the stats, there are never any for parking offences, despite the fact that the police attend meetings and we tell them where to look ( and even if you were blind you would STILL detect them - they park on the pavements)

Outside of London, it's not specifically illegal to park on the footway. It is illegal to drive on the footway, and of course it's hardly likely that any vehicle parked on the footway was placed there other than by driving it, but you never hear of anyone getting done that way. I believe you can be done for causing an obstruction, but again how often does that actually happen? Never, as far as I can see based on evidence in my local area.

The SNP government did actually run a consultation on a proposed law in Scotland to make parking on the footway illegal. I participated in the consultation, but I've never heard anything more about it since.
Moley on 16 Jan 2017
In reply to Martin W:

If I remember rightly, parking on a pavement is causing an obstruction - that is what the ticket is issued for. The problem with issuing the ticket is proving that there is an obstruction, if the driver contests the ticket and can show that there is still room for a pedestrian to walk past the vehicle and a pedestrian with say a pram and child, then he is not causing an obstruction, in the eye of the law. Obviously camera phones etc. come into play now as evidence.
It can all be a total waste of magistrates (and traffic wardens) time when these go to court, hence only in full on obstruction do drivers tend to be ticketed for parking on the pavement - or if the traffic warden is trying to meet his targets for the day and still a couple of tickets short!!
ianstevens - on 16 Jan 2017
In reply to Moley:
> A few years ago all traffic wardens were removed from Aberystwyth (a political decision over who paid for them), without any enforcement mayhem ensued within weeks

> And it was mayhem, we sometimes visited and what happened when motorists are given a free hand was very much jungle mentality, quite unbelievable.

It was actually nowhere near as bad as the press made it out to be. Yes, there was some bad parking, but the actual, more interesting upshot was that those of us who lived in the town centre were actually able to park near our houses for more than 1 hour. Shoppers, on the whole, rather than expect to be able to park for free (as there was never any space in the time-restricted slots in the middle of town) actually used the huge pay-and-display car parks a whole *gasp* five minute walk away. I'd much rather see a return to this systems where road-scale residents permits are intorduced and those who visit the town have to park slightly out from the centre.

Obviously there were still some morons blocking roads etc., but these were generally in the minority and tended to be cars that seemed to continue to do as they wished once wardens were returned.
Post edited at 10:15
1
bedspring on 16 Jan 2017
In reply to afshapes:

> Maybe if you park on double yellow lines you should forfeit your insurance so that you're only covered third party?

Possibly you do. If an accident occurred you could be seen as negligent. Could the insurance not refuse to pay out to the policy holder on those grounds.
Jim C - on 20 Jan 2017
In reply to Martin W:
> It is illegal to drive on the footway, and of course it's hardly likely that any vehicle parked on the footway was placed there other than by driving it, but you never hear of anyone getting done that way. I believe you can be done for causing an obstruction, but again how often does that actually happen? Never, as far as I can see based on evidence in my local area.

I have a friend with a disabled daughter, he will not go on the road to get past a car parked on the pavement (unless it's totally blocked) , as as he says, 'if that means the car gets scratched by the wheelchair, So be it'
Post edited at 16:44
Lusk - on 20 Jan 2017
In reply to Jim C:

> I have a friend with a disabled daughter, he will not go on the road to get past a car parked on the pavement (unless it's totally blocked) , as as he says, 'if that means the car gets scratched by the wheelchair, So be it'

Is your friend a Maths teacher by any chance?!

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