/ Con manifesto costings ?

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lummox - on 19 May 2017
Could someone please point me in the right direction for the above please ?
5
Jack - on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

Think I've managed to track them down

http://www.this-page-intentionally-left-blank.org/
2
Andy Hardy on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

A strong, stable government will have a stable tax income from our strong economy.
That is all you need to know, now stop worrying about it and repeat the magic incantation "strong and stable" 3 times
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Chris the Tall - on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

Do you want financial or human costs ?
2
Postmanpat on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

> Could someone please point me in the right direction for the above please ?

I'll give you a clue. It's not £50bn.
Chris the Tall - on 19 May 2017
In reply to Postmanpat:

> I'll give you a clue. It's not £50bn.

Is it £350 million a week ?

4
Postmanpat on 19 May 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> Is it £350 million a week ?

You're doing that naughty thing that lefties like to do: pretending that the Tories supported brexit.
2
3leggeddog on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

A fair percentage of the pensioner vote?
Chris the Tall - on 19 May 2017
In reply to Postmanpat:

Here's a picture of the guy May promoted to Foreign Sec, in case you've forgotten what he looks like

http://news.images.itv.com/image/file/978061/img.jpg

Not all Tories supported Brexit, but the referendum was their manifesto commitment. Years of lying about Europe created a monster they couldn't control, and it turned round and bit them (and the rest of us)
4
Postmanpat on 19 May 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:
> Here's a picture of the guy May promoted to Foreign Sec, in case you've forgotten what he looksNot all Tories supported Brexit, but the referendum was their manifesto commitment.
>
That's bit like saying that if Labour wins the election it is because the Tories supported him. After all, a Tory called the election. The Tories didn't cause brexit. They gave the people a choice. It turns out that the people wanted a choice.

There has always been an element of both parties, more often but not always bigger in the Tories, that has been eurosceptic. But the Tory party, like the Labour party, has generally been dominated by pro-European. Last time I checked Ted Heath was a Tory, and John Major, and Mrs.T and David Cameron.

You are revealing the true colours of the dwindling band of remainers. Their hatred of the Tories is much bigger than their enthusiam for the EU or commitment to democracy.

Anyway, not the point of the thread. Instead I'll quote that lovable old remainer, Ken Clarke (still a Tory last time I checked)

" “today’s public relations politics has this crazy thing where you should have a detailed manifesto full of hostages to fortune.”

"“So you shouldn’t cost manifestos?” asked Humphrys.

“Certainly not!” replied Clarke. “The idea that I’d have to go to the manifesto to see what the budget is going to have in it is crazy. Because you don’t know!”

We'll make an exception for a manifesto that want to increase State spending by £50bn to a level not seen in 70 years.

Enjoy your evening
Post edited at 18:35
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tom_in_edinburgh - on 19 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

How much does it cost to have no trade agreements for years while you try and negotiate new ones with the entire world to replace the ones you had as a member of the EU?

Compared with disrupting every exporting business for a period of years the tinkering with other policies is pretty much irrelevant.
1
Yanis Nayu - on 19 May 2017
In reply to Postmanpat:

How convenient!
3
BnB - on 20 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

> Could someone please point me in the right direction for the above please ?

I think the parties are proceeding form very different places, so our expectations of their arithmetic are equally different.

The Tories are promising Lent, Labour is offering Christmas. One party is associated with financial probity, the other with profligacy (deserved or not, depending on your colours). The biggest policy in the Tory manifesto grasps the rampantly spreading nettle of social care for the elderly, putting the cost on the dead, not the state. Labour's big story is a borrow and spend compulsory repurchase of utilities without offering any evidence of their ability to deliver.

We can be fairly confident the sums add up particularly when room has been left for tax rises on the well off. Surely your question should be "What are the Tory manifesto SPENDING plans?"
3
summo on 20 May 2017
In reply to lummox:

> Could someone please point me in the right direction for the above please ?

The price is not having Corbyn as PM. A small price to pay.
stevieb - on 20 May 2017
In reply to BnB:

I basically agree with this.
I never understand why the conservatives have this reputation for being good with money; increasing spending on hospitals and schools is profligate, but reducing tax income below spending, or sending the unemployment figures soaring is prudent (let's not even mention the B word).

Nonetheless, this conservative manifesto seems to be one of the most miserly I've ever seen. They are so confident of winning that they are openly telling us bad news.
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summo on 20 May 2017
In reply to stevieb:

> Nonetheless, this conservative manifesto seems to be one of the most miserly I've ever seen. They are so confident of winning that they are openly telling us bad news.

I think a fair proportion of UK voters need this wake up call. Annual deficit, state debt, personal debt, low tax, declining services.. time for things to come home to roost.
BnB - on 20 May 2017
In reply to stevieb:

I think it's as much by way of contrast with Labour. The more miserly they present themselves, the more it throws Labour's spree into question.

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