/ No more dancing this year!

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Goucho on 07 Jun 2017
As some of you will be aware, post the Eiger, I was intending to have a crack at both the Colton Mac and Peuterey Integrale this winter.

Well, I can report that I failed to even reach the start of either, and as far as any future attempts go, I'm out of action for the foreseable future!

This is all thanks to a spectacularly feat of incompetence several weeks ago, involving a hidden patch of ice, too much speed, not enough skill, a snagged outer edge of a ski, and a number of bouncing somersaults, resulting in my left shoulder being wrenched out of its socket, and my nose broken for the fifth time

After putting my shoulder back in its socket, the doctors discovered a large amount of damage to my rotator cuff. I am now due to have surgery on it in a couple of weeks time, but they're not even certain that will completely fix it?

So my mountain activity is now restricted to walking for quite a while (our trip to Bhutan was already booked, and I was buggered if I was going to let it stop that, even though the doctors advised against it. As it turned out, a combination of stubborness and pain killers meant we enjoyed a fabulous trek, as mentioned on another thread).

Of course all of this - bearing in mind my age, and the loss of climbing fitness which will be inevitable over the next 12 months+ - means it's possibly time to accept that my Indian alpine summer is over, and my Swan Song has already been sung.

Still, 1 out 3 is better than 0 out 3

Tom Last - on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:
Sorry to hear that. I like everybody else I'm sure was looking forward to you trip reports from the aforementioned climbs. Your profile puts you at 59 though, surely not game over just yet?

Question from somebody who doesn't really know about such things, is Peuterery Integral usually done in winter then?
Post edited at 16:26
Goucho on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Tom Last:
> Sorry to hear that. I like everybody else I'm sure was looking forward to you trip reports from the aforementioned climbs. Your profile puts you at 59 though, surely not game over just yet?

As anyone at this age knows Tom, getting too, and maintaining that level of alpine fitness is hard gained, but lost depressingly easily

Question from somebody who doesn't really know about such things, is Peuterery Integral usually done in winter then?

It is done in summer, but doing it in winter makes it a much bigger and harder challenge.
Post edited at 16:32
Tom Last - on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:

Ah fair play refarding hopes for a winter attempt then, that sounds hardcore.

Projecting forward another couple of decades I can well believe what you're saying. Don't you bloody believe it though, that way it'll never happen - you gotta stay positive!

Best of luck with your recovery.
Trangia on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:

Sorry to hear that, but you've had a good run and maybe it's time to start a new phase of your life? If you enjoy TGA, which obviously you do, then there is a whole new world to discover out there, particularly with walking.

I still think of myself as a skier, although its 4 years now since I last went. My biggest worry now, is not falling due catching an edge or similar, but being run into by some out of control idiot from behind. Being wiped out when you are 60 plus is no longer a joke and the thought of breaking a bone or similar at my age isn't attractive, so increasingly I am increasingly aiming to reduce the risk by switching to other less risky pursuits, particularly walking.

There can still be plenty of challenge out there, particularly in exploration and navigation.

The same applies to climbing, I get a lot of enjoyment from bumbling about leading low grade climbs now rather than pushing myself to the point of falling.

I'd rather climb easy routes and still get the thrill of exposure and the environment than not climb at all.

BTW how come you keep breaking your nose? Do you upset people in pubs or something?
Goucho on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Tom Last:

> Ah fair play refarding hopes for a winter attempt then, that sounds hardcore. Projecting forward another couple of decades I can well believe what you're saying. Don't you bloody believe it though, that way it'll never happen - you gotta stay positive!Best of luck with your recovery.

Oh I've got no intention of giving up on future alpine climbing, but depending on the long-term outcome for my shoulder, I may have to lower my sights regarding future climbs.
Goucho on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Trangia:

If I could park my insecure male ego, and stop trying to keep up with Mrs G, who's an ex pro ski racer, I'd be fine

As for my nose, well that's the result of fights x 2 - one involving hells angels and a disputed game of pool in the Sally in Ambleside, and the other in a bar in Anchorage, the Eiger NF x 1, hit by the gib on the boat x 1, and the most recent
BusyLizzie on 07 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:

You are clearly a hero, but your poor nose has been very unlucky!! Best wishes for the shoulder surgery and the recovery process , which all sounds painful and daunting. Stubbornness and the love of Mrs G will get you through.
nickh1964 - on 08 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:

That is a shame, I always enjoy your posts.
You will naturally be a bit deflated for a while, but then you can decide what the future shape of things will be, get back to Alpinism, explore, take up stamp collecting, there are always new challenges. Totally agree that getting older sucks, but we were at Bramcrag last week and there they were, Johnny Adams and Colin Downer, climbing and new routing away - it aint over till its over !
Goucho on 08 Jun 2017
In reply to nickh1964:

> That is a shame, I always enjoy your posts. You will naturally be a bit deflated for a while, but then you can decide what the future shape of things will be, get back to Alpinism, explore, take up stamp collecting, there are always new challenges. Totally agree that getting older sucks, but we were at Bramcrag last week and there they were, Johnny Adams and Colin Downer, climbing and new routing away - it aint over till its over !

Thanks

Actually I'm not that deflated really. I've had the privilege and luck over many years to climb lots of great routes in great places with great people.

It is a bit frustrating though, as I've been having a second wind, and going really well - especially for an old has been

I'm just glad this happened after scratching the big itch, not before.

If I end up having to rest on my laurels, I can't complain, I've had a pretty good innings.

We'll just have to wait and see?
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leon 1 on 08 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:
Good luck with the surgery. Im a bit older than you and two years ago I took a flier whilst out running and landed on my shoulder. I was unable to lift my arm above shoulder height, (or sometimes even at all )for a couple of months. I was however stupid and didnt go to the doctors on the basis that it hurt but would get better. (yes I know, really stupid !) Eventually after 8 months I went to the doctors and got referred on to hospital where they found I had cracked my collar bone, cracked my humerus, had an impinged shoulder and worst of all torn my bicep. All had pretty much repaired itself except for the torn bicep which was too big a tear for them to even try surgery.
Two years on I can just about swing an axe ok but find myself unable to trust myself to even try to do pull ups just in case it all rips again
Ive now learnt to lower my ambitions in the mountains but find it just as satisfying to go trekking or climb a grade 3 as I did when I was younger. Just being in the mountains is enough.
I do hope the surgery is successful for you but if not dont worry too much about it You` really will find other ways to enjoy the mountains just as much.
Post edited at 10:41
Goucho on 08 Jun 2017
In reply to BusyLizzie:

> You are clearly a hero, but your poor nose has been very unlucky!! Best wishes for the shoulder surgery and the recovery process , which all sounds painful and daunting. Stubbornness and the love of Mrs G will get you through.



I am indeed a very lucky man to have Mrs G in my life
kenr - on 08 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:
> As anyone at this age knows Tom, getting too, and maintaining that level of alpine fitness
> is hard gained, but lost depressingly easily

But for some people, also gained _back _faster than expected.
Because the body and mind retain some sort of chemical "memory" of the fitness design they had before the loss -- so with a strong dose of specific exercise stimulation, it can return in a much shorter period than it took to obtain the first time.

The price is many hours of painful measured specific painful exercise per week.

Ken
davidbeynon on 09 Jun 2017
In reply to kenr:
I am going over that cliff at the moment.

5 years ago I could pretty much do nothing for a few months and be fit on demand with 3 weeks notice. Having to start making an effort came as a bit of a nasty surprise.

In reply to Groucho:

That's crappy luck. Hope you recover soon.
Post edited at 00:44
blackcat on 09 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho: Sorry to hear that mate,hope your recovery goes well.The nose, what happened the other four times.

Footloose - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to Goucho:

After a serious fracture dislocation of my shoulder, the consultant said the complications (including a large tear in the rotator cuff) were too great to operate, and he predicted I'd be unable to use that arm until I was old enough for a complete shoulder replacement. Fortunately the physio disagreed, and within a year I was cladding and painting ceilings, playing the violin (it's my bowing arm) and out with my backpack. Some of my actions are bizarre (the arm healed in the wrong position) but there's nothing I can't do, and it's stronger than the other shoulder now. Determination is the key to a complete recovery. Good luck!

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