/ The DUP

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Frank4short - on 09 Jun 2017
So it would appear vast sections of the British nay English media have taken to referring to the Democratic Unionist Party as Irish. And whilst technically from a geographical perspective this is correct, it would certainly appear in the way it's being reported to have a sense of them looking down their noses at the references to Irish. Otherwise why is it being emphasised.

So to set a few things straight - we, the nation of the Republic of Ireland, and a good portion of NI are as horrified about them being king makers as anyone else is. So with this in mind don't tar us all with the same brush, because frankly it's offensive to the Irish. Secondly and this deserves mentioning is, you can be sure if you call any card carrying DUP member Irish they'll jump down your throat in protest that they are not actually Irish but British.

So therefore please desist with any further prejudicial references to Irish, paddies, etc when referring to the DUP. As frankly it's offensive to a lot of people who've nothing to do with them.
7
marsbar - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

It all seems simple when you read this

https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/blog/2011/08/whats-the-difference-between-uk-britain-and-british-is...

And then keep reading and it's less simple.

MG - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:
> So it would appear vast sections of the British nay English media have taken to referring to the Democratic Unionist Party as Irish. And whilst technically from a geographical perspective this is correct, it would certainly appear in the way it's being reported to have a sense of them looking down their noses at the references to Irish.

Well I can see it must be frustrating if you are "properly" Irish, but, honestly, I do look down on NI in a political and religious sense. It's a childish mess, they spent 30 years killing each other and now produce parties like the DUP and Sinn Feinn.
Post edited at 15:54
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TobyA on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

Have you heard anyone call the DUP paddies , micks or things like that? I haven't and while I don't claim any great insight into the minds of the prejudiced and petty racists, I'd be surprised if people mixed up rabid Unionists with the casual insults towards Irish people (mainly meaning citizens of the Republic)!
1
Pursued by a bear - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

Is it okay to refer to them as swivel-eyed god-bothering loons?

T.
2
Pete Pozman - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> Is it okay to refer to them as swivel-eyed god-bothering loons?T.

I think that would be quite in order, yes.
3
Frank4short - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to TobyA:

> Have you heard anyone call the DUP paddies , micks or things like that? I haven't and while I don't claim any great insight into the minds of the prejudiced and petty racists, I'd be surprised if people mixed up rabid Unionists with the casual insults towards Irish people (mainly meaning citizens of the Republic)!

I've seen it on FB 3 times since yesterday morning. All by what i assume were, based on their mates, card carrying momentum members.

Frankly i'm not a violent person but if you call me paddy or mick in person i'd probably go for you. As i experienced a fair bit of casual racism from some English i worked for in France a long time ago. To see it coming out again with reference to the DUP is even more annoying.
5
Frank4short - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> Is it okay to refer to them as swivel-eyed god-bothering loons?T.

That is satisfactory.
3
Yanis Nayu - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

I read something on Twitter earlier about the fragility of the power sharing deal in NI at the moment, and the fact that May is willing to compromise it further in her pathetic attempt to cling to power after a catastrophe of entirely her own making says everything about her.

That without even considering that they're loons.
1
TobyA on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

Maybe it's a young and lefty thing? A mix of not having any personal memories of the Troubles and some self-righteousness blinding them to their ignorance. I reckon lots of people in Britain under 30 or even 40 do not have clear ideas in their minds between Northern Irish Republicans, Northern Irish Unionists, political Unionists, violent Unionist terrorists and even between Northern Ireland and Eire more generally. Then I've read and heard people of that sort of radical-left bent say things about Israel/Palestine that I, as a non-Jew, felt were on the line of just being straight-out anti-semitism. A Jewish person would probably hear it as well over the line. The left can be just as holier than thou as the right and that can cloud you from realising what you don't know!
1
MonkeyPuzzle - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> Is it okay to refer to them as swivel-eyed god-bothering loons?T.

I would've gone with irresponsible swivel-eyed god-bothering crooks.
2
krikoman - on 10 Jun 2017
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> I would've gone with irresponsible swivel-eyed god-bothering crooks.

I'd have gone with evolution-denying irresponsible swivel-eyed god-bothering crooks
2
Graeme Alderson on 11 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

> Frankly i'm not a violent person but if you call me paddy or mick in person i'd probably go for you.

Well in that case you actually are a violent person. Period, End of. Remember the old saying "sticks and stones..."

4
Frank4short - on 11 Jun 2017
In reply to Graeme Alderson:

What exactly was the point of that addition, other than being contrary for the sake of being contrary?

In other business i'm curious about the serial disliker(s) to all of the comments here. Do we have a few DUP supporters in the house? <waves> Coooeeeeyyy!
1
fred99 - on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

Considering the manner in which many Irish seem to spit out the word "Brit" when referring to the English, this seems a bit rich.
I agree that one should never stereotype people based on their place of birth (or anything else for that matter), but it cuts both ways.
Pursued by a bear - on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

After further consideration, I've changed my reference to gay-hating evolution-denying climate change-refusing god-bothering sputum-flecked swivel-eyed loons. I trust that's still satisfactory.

T.
1
jkarran - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> After further consideration, I've changed my reference to gay-hating evolution-denying climate change-refusing god-bothering sputum-flecked swivel-eyed loons. I trust that's still satisfactory.

I'd simplify that a bit. I think the description we're looking for, somewhat ironically given May's rabble rousing last week is 'extremists'.
jk
sensibleken - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:

"Considering the manner in which many Irish seem to spit out the word "Brit" when referring to the English, this seems a bit rich."

Is Brit considered an offensive term like Paddy or Mick is?
sg - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to sensibleken:


> Is Brit considered an offensive term like Paddy or Mick is?

Offence is a complicated concept really. Generally speaking, if someone has had to defend themselves against claims of causing offence then they've probably not thought about what they've said or written.

There are plenty of people who like to take absolute positions on these things and say things like 'well if that's offensive, then this must be too...'. As a middle-class, middle-aged, graduate, male WASP all I know is that I should probably be the last person to call offence. It's usually a question of history, perspective and intent. If people don't know when they're being offensive they're probably ignorant. If they do know, then there is some element of malice.

Pete Pozman - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to sensibleken:

> "Considering the manner in which many Irish seem to spit out the word "Brit" when referring to the English, this seems a bit rich."

> Is Brit considered an offensive term like Paddy or Mick is?

I've decided to be Irish now so yes. Brit seems to me to be a redtop term so I hate it anyway.
1
fred99 - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to sensibleken:

The law states that it is the opinion of the person complaining about the language used who matters, not the person using the language.
Also as I said, "the manner in which many Irish seem to spit out the word "Brit" ".

You, as an Irishman, I am sure, consider both Paddy and Mick to be offensive.
I, as an Englishman, consider Brit to be offensive.

After all, just because some persons from (principally) the southern states of the USA regard the "N" word to be perfectly alright, it isn't, even if a majority in a particular area might think so.
2
MG - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:

> The law states that it is the opinion of the person complaining about the language used who matters, not the person using the language.

I don't think that's correct.

> I, as an Englishman, consider Brit to be offensive.

Bizarre!
1
Mike Stretford - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:

> I, as an Englishman, consider Brit to be offensive.

How very un-English. One couldn't imagine the late great Roger Moore being offended by 'Brit', I doubt he'd raise an eyebrow.
fred99 - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to MG:

If you look back, you'll see I refer to the way some Irish spit the word out.

For that matter, how many times have you heard a woman use the word "man", as in, "just like a man" or "typical man" - the intention here, and the way they are received, is as a form of abuse (varying from joking through mild to downright hate, depending on the situation and the way it is uttered).
sensibleken - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:

>If you look back, you'll see I refer to the way some Irish spit the word out.

I don't really understand what you mean by this, can you elaborate?



fred99 - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to sensibleken:

> >If you look back, you'll see I refer to the way some Irish spit the word out.

> I don't really understand what you mean by this, can you elaborate?

Some Irish make a point of hating and blaming the English for everything that has ever gone wrong. Even when those to blame are Irish they still blame the English, and moreover they blame ALL of the English, even though only a very small percentage of the population would have had any hand in what may have happened.
These Irish use the term "Brit" as an insult, emphasised by the way in which it is uttered.

I am not a "Brit", I am British. I like British, I use British. I do not however touch the term "Brit" - I have always left that to likes of the IRA.
Mike Stretford - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:
> Some Irish make a point of hating and blaming the English for everything that has ever gone wrong. Even when those to blame are Irish they still blame the English, and moreover they blame ALL of the English, even though only a very small percentage of the population would have had any hand in what may have happened.

In my lifetime that has always been a vocal minority, and Ireland has changed a lot in the last 20 years IMO, more outward looking, less religious. Also worth remembering derogatory jokes about the Irish used to be common place in England.

> I am not a "Brit", I am British. I like British, I use British. I do not however touch the term "Brit" - I have always left that to likes of the IRA.

'Brit' is used the world over and is pretty neutral.... the main popular music award is called the 'Brits'! Your view is certainly not mainstream.
Post edited at 11:15
sensibleken - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fred99:
Well that all sounds very hyperbolic and quite unlikely. I don't know who these Irish people you have met are so I can't speak for the specific example. But it sounds as if the context of the conversation was some sort of historical or political discussion. In which case the context of 'Brits' or English is in reference to the state. They're hardly referring to somebody from an estate in Doncaster.

You are certainly the only person I have ever heard interpret the word Brit as an insult.
Post edited at 11:24
fred99 - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to sensibleken:

In that case we must disagree, you IRISH.
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Andy Hardy on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Pursued by a bear:
> After further consideration, I've changed my reference to gay-hating evolution-denying climate change-refusing god-bothering sputum-flecked swivel-eyed loons. I trust that's still satisfactory.

> T.

Can't we just call them bellends?
Post edited at 13:35
Jim Fraser - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Frank4short:

There is nothing surer than that those c0nts are not very British.

They were borne on an an island called Ireland so they are Irish and they and anyone else can like it or lump it.

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