/ Waiting for the ink to dry

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keith-ratcliffe on 12 Jun 2017
Extract from a BBC News story.
"One of the reasons for the delay to the Queen's Speech is also believed to be because the speech has to be written on goat's skin parchment paper, which takes a few days to dry - and the Tory negotiations with the DUP mean it cannot be ready in time."
So this is the real reason for delaying it.
jethro kiernan - on 12 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

Makes "Great Britain" start to appear like some ageing actor well past his prime with the wig and make up failing under the heat of international scrutiny. :-/
1
Siward on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to jethro kiernan:

Your genuine vellum, so it was said, is good for at least 5,000 years, much longer than paper, which is why we still have documents such as Magna Carta. No point spoiling the ship etc...
Hat Dude on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to Siward:

> Your genuine vellum, so it was said, is good for at least 5,000 years, much longer than paper, which is why we still have documents such as Magna Carta. No point spoiling the ship etc...

I very much doubt Theresa's offering will be worth preserving for posterity; a sheet of Izal would probably suffice
3
GarethSL on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to Hat Dude:

Or any of the UK's local council toilet paper...

On second thoughts that stuff will probably last forever.
2
andyjohnson0 - on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

According to this tweet its a myth:

@dustshoveller : I was Director of the @UKParlArchives for 6 years and I can tell you that the Queen's Speech is not made of parchment, goat or otherwise.

https://twitter.com/dustshoveller/status/874302689701748736
Hat Dude on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to andyjohnson0:

> According to this tweet its a myth:

Izal it is then!
Postmanpat on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

No, Evan Davis confirmed last night on Newsnight that this is not the case.
RomTheBear on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

I thought this was bullshit though, they can always write it on goat skin or unicorn ass skin or whatever that is after the speech is delivered, can't they ?
BusyLizzie on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

Statutes are still written on vellum; I don't think the Queen's Speech is.
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galpinos on 13 Jun 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

Is vellum not calfskin?

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