/ Muscle stretching, neurodynamics, potential neurophysiology

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koalapie - on 14 Jun 2017
Hello UKC, long time!

Recent research paper and blog on hamstring stretching, neurodynamics and potential neurophysiological mechanisms (full text hyperlinked from blog).

https://noijam.com/2017/06/09/the-modified-long-sit-slump/

I hope you enjoy the piece and discussion.
Max


stp - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to koalapie:

As someone with tight hamstrings I read with interest. Doesn't go into much detail about how to do the Modified Long Sit Slump. Is it simply just doing the stretch in the photos or is there more to it than that?

According to Russian author Pavel Tsatsouline when we 'stretch' our muscles what we're really doing is resetting our nervous system to allow our limbs to move further.

Interesting that neurodynamic tension already takes place with yoga. Though yoga seems like it needs to be practised very regularly and the benefits don't seem to last for 3+ weeks if you don't do anything, unlike the results from this technique.
koalapie - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to stp:

Good questions, most of which are covered if you read the blog and full article thoroughly, but I will address them specifically below. As a prelude, the primary purpose of the OP was feedback/reference for all the stretching/yoga discussions I have had over the years on UKC, not as a 'how to' guide. Please see a qualified professional who has been educated in 'neurodynamics' and trained in utilising the MLSS before attempting the technique.

> As someone with tight hamstrings I read with interest. Doesn't go into much detail about how to do the Modified Long Sit Slump. Is it simply just doing the stretch in the photos or is there more to it than that?
A full description of the technique (therapist assisted) is detailed in the methodology section of the JSR article. You can access it for free through the hyperlink in the blog.

> According to Russian author Pavel Tsatsouline when we 'stretch' our muscles what we're really doing is resetting our nervous system to allow our limbs to move further.
Yes, overall the evidence for this assertion appears strong, I would argue 'resetting the nervous system' is a more generic a term than sensory modulation of lasting changes in muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance. From a climbing perspective, this relates to what you are trying to stretch, why and when?

> Interesting that neurodynamic tension already takes place with yoga. Though yoga seems like it needs to be practised very regularly and the benefits don't seem to last for 3+ weeks if you don't do anything, unlike the results from this technique.
The current study was of young healthy subjects with tight hamstrings who had not stretched in the preceding 6 months so it's a different sample to those who do yoga 3+ times per week. The study demonstrated a potential 'diminishing returns effect,' that is the more flexible you were at the start of each session the less gain you got from the stretch, although the gains were still significant. That is somewhat consistent with what you are describing but probably requires more research. 'Need' is also quite a strong word, do you have any objective data regarding how often yoga needs to be practised and to maintain what effect?

stp - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to koalapie:

Thanks for the reply.

Re the yoga, no I don't have any objective data, it's just the impression I've got from reading around the subject, that regular practice is required for full benefit.

The other thing I've come across for stretching is the importance of strength. One video I saw was saying that for increasing flexibility in side splits position it is beneficial to strengthen the adductors which will help with flexibility too. Is there much/any evidence to support that claim?
koalapie - on 17 Jun 2017
In reply to stp:

> Re the yoga, no I don't have any objective data, it's just the impression I've got from reading around the subject, that regular practice is required for full benefit.

> The other thing I've come across for stretching is the importance of strength. One video I saw was saying that for increasing flexibility in side splits position it is beneficial to strengthen the adductors which will help with flexibility too. Is there much/any evidence to support that claim?

https://scholar.google.com.au/


kenr - on 21 Jun 2017
In reply to stp:
> The other thing I've come across for stretching is the importance of strength.

Funny thing is that some recent research is showing that stretching _weakens_ muscles.

So the follow-up research now starting to be reported is about how _much_ it weakens muscles.

Ken
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alx - on 21 Jun 2017
In reply to kenr:

What is the context? Stretching lots before exercise is known to reduce output, stretching after exercise seems to be widely accepted as a good thing.

I stick with foam rolling, muscle activation using a hockey ball and range of movement drills prior to exercise then either stretch straight afterwards or the following day of exercise.

Have had good results with light stretching between sets.

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