/ Wagtails

Simon Caldwell - on 14 Jun 2017
What's the deal with wagtail nests? Should they be avoided completely (like ring ouzels), or are they highly tolerant (like jackdaws) or somewhere in between?
We saw one at Stanage on Sunday, which appeared to be building a nest just to the left of Black Hawk Hell Crack The route had a steady stream of people climbing it that day, so clearly the bird wasn't too bothered, but it was concerned enough top fly around a lot with plenty of stopping and staring before it disappeared into the crack with its beak of feathers.

Ron Rees Davies - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Are you sure it was feathers and not insects it was carrying? Most wagtails are nearing the end of rearing the first brood at the moment; unlikely to be nest building.

If they're nesting near a popular route they're obviously not too bothered. Obviously try to avoid direct disturbance but climbing nearby shouldn't be an issue.
toad - on 14 Jun 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Ive known grey wagtails nest in lock gates with 20+ boat movements a day through them, so they were fairly tolerant, but it will vary from animal to animal
Tom V - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to toad:

How come grey wagtails are not?
Jim C - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Ron Rees Davies:
> Are you sure it was feathers and not insects it was carrying? Most wagtails are nearing the end of rearing the first brood at the moment; unlikely to be nest building.

Maybe they do some nest repairs after the first clutch has fledged, before laying the second?
Post edited at 03:10
Michael Hood - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Tom V:

> How come grey wagtails are not?

Their backs are.
Rob Parsons on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Michael Hood:

> Their backs are.

Indeed. And we have to save the name 'Yellow Wagtail' for the species which really deserves it.
Simon Caldwell - on 16 Jun 2017
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Michael Hood - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Definitely is from those photos.