/ Glacier Glasses are Rubbish

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fifthsunset - on 15 Jun 2017
Can anyone recommend a decent pair of cat 4 glacier glasses? I've got a pair of Julbo...Not sure which model exactly, I think they might be the Dolgan but they don't look exactly like the ones currently on the Julbo website.

Anyway they're shite. The arms dig into my head and the lenses get fogged up as soon as I get going. Any contenders? Julbo seem to have the market sewn up. There's also the Dragon Mountaineering X but I would've thought wrap-arounds would be a better design for glacier glasses than wayfarers.
Lusk - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

I'm assuming the arms are plastic...
Use a hot air gun to soften the arms and bend them into a more amenable position/shape.
It's what opticians do.
davidbeynon on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

I have a pair of those somewhere. They don't fog up for me but the loss of peripheral vision is a nuisance with the screens on, and the light leaking in is unpleasant when they are off.

I got some Cat 4 wraparounds for skiing a few years ago and haven't looked back.
Jim 1003 - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

Decathalon.....
JimBee - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Jim 1003:
Not sure if you're joking but I just picked up a pair of wedze wrap arounds for €15 cat 4 not polarised. Worked fine for me and I overheat easily. They don't have the soft padding that some do, they're really just wrap around plastic alpine sun glasses.
1
99ster - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

Adidas do some really nice CAT4 glasses - but they're not cheap....well worth looking at it you're after some good ones.
veteye on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to JimBee:

Sounds a really bad idea not to be polarised. With that degree of reduction in overall light transmitted, I would imagine that your pupils will be more dilated and you will get even more UV light arriving at your retina. Are you sure that they are not polarised? Does Cat 4 not include an obligatory polarisation?
Dave the Rave on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to davidbeynon:


> I got some Cat 4 wraparounds for skiing a few years ago and haven't looked back.

I see what you did there! Nice one;)
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to veteye:

Polarising is just a coating to cut out glare. It has nothing to do with the Category of the glasses. Polarized glasses are best used on water, there's no real benefit to polarized glasses for mountain use.
2
MG - on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

Another decathlon recommendation. They are decent and cheap. Cat 3 is fine.
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Rob Parsons on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to veteye:

> Sounds a really bad idea not to be polarised. With that degree of reduction in overall light transmitted, I would imagine that your pupils will be more dilated and you will get even more UV light arriving at your retina. Are you sure that they are not polarised?

That doesn't make any sense. The effect of a polarized lens on radiation has nothing to do with the frequency of that radiation.
Smythson on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

Bloc Chameleon X400 Cat 4's - they have metal wire running through the arm so you can change the shape to your ears and head. Also the nose pads are on a metal piece, again can be formed to your face. Lenses are already vented but the surround is removable if you need more venting. Should be less than £40 too.

veteye on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

I can see that generally, but I thought(and I realise that I may be wrong) that depending on the separation, that it could screen out certain wavelengths by affecting the phase of those particular wavelengths. Is that totally wrong?
Rob Parsons on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to veteye:

Phase has also nothing to do with it; the only significant thing is the frequency of the radiation (or wavelength, if prefer to think about things that way, the two values being directly related by the equation (frequency)x(wavelength)=(speed of light).)

The 'Cat 4' rating indicates a particular range of transmittance for light in the visible spectrum only.

Beyond that, *any* proper pair of sunglasses *should* filter 100% of UV (and IR) light - but again, that's not what the 'Cat' rating refers to.

Polarized lenses are helpful in reducing 'glare' (since light which is reflected off water becomes strongly polarized in one direction, so can therefore be selectively filtered out) but otherwise aren't relevant in this discussion.
tjin - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

Actually i heard people recommend against polarized lenses since it makes crevasses harder to see...
jonnie3430 - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

But it is because they selectively screen out the reflection coming up off the snow in the same way they screen it coming off the water.

To the OP: do you need them? I have bad eyes but have still only used normal sunglasses on glaciers and haven't had the burns. Top sunglass tip for me at the moment is to buy PPE sunglasses from a builders shop. £6 will get you some good looking bolle ones.
2
fifthsunset - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to tjin:

> Actually i heard people recommend against polarized lenses since it makes crevasses harder to see...

I've just been reading about this. Apparently polarising lenses make it harder to distinguish snow from ice.

https://www.ccoutdoorstore.com/blog/gear-reviews/glacier-and-mountaineering-glasses/

yesbutnobutyesbut - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

I've skied toured with polarised glasses and you sometimes can't tell when you're going to hit an icy patch as the lenses make all the snow look pretty much the same, not such a problem moving slowly on the flat or uphill but it is if you're turning when descending quickly.
davidbeynon on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to tjin:

The thing I dislike about polarised glasses is that when I have reflective objects close by they feed my left and right eyes images with inconsistent reflections and I end up with a headache.

It's fine for distant things like driving but I can't climb with them.
RX-78 on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to davidbeynon:

decathlon as well, one model comes with a band so can put around a helmet, i used it for skiing, as also came with additions to seal up holes so no snow could get in. Not bad looking either.
ads.ukclimbing.com
duchessofmalfi - on 16 Jun 2017

Bolle spiders - why bother with owt else?
veteye on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

I do know the equation Lambda(can't find the symbol) x f=c
Yet I thought that by phase the waves could be cancelled out. Anyway, that does not sound as if it is the case.

I am sure that on a plas y brenin course many moons ago it was suggested to try to have polarised lenses due to the reflected light, or does my memory serve me ill?
Rob Parsons on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to veteye:

> I am sure that on a plas y brenin course many moons ago it was suggested to try to have polarised lenses due to the reflected light, or does my memory serve me ill?

Sure - that's the point of polarized lenses. As discussed above, since light reflected from water can become strongly polarized in one direction, polarized lenses can selectively filter out that reflected light. But that's not germane to your original point (and in any case, as others have implied, it might not be a desirable effect on snow/ice.)
Toerag - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

What he means is that polarised lenses attenuate the brightest light (reflected glare) without attenuating everything else. With non-polarised glasses the lens needs to be darker to deal with the same amount of glare. Because the non-polarised lens is darker your pupils are likely to widen to try to see less bright objects, and thus let in more UV light.
Toerag - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

> Polarized glasses are best used on water, there's no real benefit to polarized glasses for mountain use.

There is where light reflects off things such as snow, ice & reflective rock.

1
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Toerag:

It's actually a benefit to be able to see icy patches more clearly a lot of the time. A non polarized cat 4 lense or even a photochromatic lense that darkens to cat 4 is going to provide all the protection your eyes need. There is no real benefit to polarized lenses for mountain use.
pavelk - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to fifthsunset:

Since I crushed my Julbos I have some JSP safety glasses which I bought for less than £10 and I am quite happy with them - they are better than Julbos definitely
Dave the Rave on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Toerag:

Polarised means fit for Polar use!
veteye on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Dave the Rave:

> Polarised means fit for Polar use!

Are we fitting them on the white bears yet?

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