/ Any botanists here?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Sean Kelly - on 15 Jun 2017
What Alpine is this? It was seen high up on Cloggy at the end of May
https://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=294714
Now I agree it's not Snowdon Lily as leaves are wrong. Wood Anemone has been suggested but that's a woodland flower. I'm leaning towards Mossy Saxifrage. Anyone with any other thoughts?
Doug on 15 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

not mossy saxifrage (looks very different) & seeing the photo with no other information I would have said wood anemone. Plants normally considered as woodland plants often occur elsewhere, especially if in the shade of rocks, etc and frequently quite high on British mountains.

http://www.tela-botanica.org/bdtfx-nn-4830-illustrations is French but has a selection of photos of wood anemone
Pete Pozman - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

I think it's wood anenome looking at the leaves. I'm not a botanist though so see what everyone else thinks.
Wulfrunian - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Not mossy saxifrage. Looks like wood anemone to me.
Doug on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Out of interest I checked the altitude range for wood anemone at http://bsbi.org/altitudes

Anemone nemorosa 1190m Ben Lawers

(I think my 'record' would have been more like 950m when I worked on Ben Lawers but don't have my field notes to hand)

so, at least in Scotland, it grows at altitudes higher than Cloggy
toad - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

I'd go with wood anenome. The right microclimate and other environmental conditions and it'll be off, woodland or not. Plants cant read the field guides. I doubt it's an indicator of former ancient woodland, mind.
waterbaby - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Another vote for wood anenome.
Dave Perry - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Wood Anemone.

Yes the do grow in woods, but they'll also grow in un-grazed ground in the same way as bluebells normally grow in woods but will also grow in other places provided they don't get trampled or eaten.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Sean Kelly - on 16 Jun 2017
In reply to Sean Kelly:

Wood Anemone it is then. The best clue for me was the leaves of the plant. Thanks for all the advice.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.