/ Heli tape widths and advice

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Lynsety - on 16 Jun 2017

Just bought a immaculate second hand bike and wanting to tape it.

Do you try and tape the full circumference on say somewhere like the chain stay or not? Trying to figure the width of tape needed.

Also any tips for applying would be great.

Thanks in advance.

Lynsey.
Post edited at 20:32
Monk - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Lynsety:

I'm no pro, but I just stick on the bits I need to stop cable rub or chain slap. I don't wrap it all around or anything. I ride my bike in hideous conditions and it's not peeled of yet.
Cloverleaf - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Lynsety:

3M Leading Edge tape (otherwise known as Heli Tape) isn't actually very good IMO. I'd recommend 300um 3M Venture Shield instead (150um is also available and for a road bike perfectly okay, but on an MTB going thicker will help protect from gouges as well as scuffing). VS is very flexible, doesn't yellow, and goes round corners. In contrast Leading Edge is hard, tears, and doesn't go round corners.
MikeSP - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Lynsety:
For the chain stay you can't do better than an old inner tube secured with some sturdy zip ties IMO.
For anything else remember a scuffed bike is a loved bike.
Post edited at 15:21
LastBoyScout on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to Lynsety:

Drive side chain-stay - tape all round, as chain can flick up as well as down. I've also got a bit on the non-drive side to prevent heal rub, on the off-chance my foot slips.

Wherever the cables might rub, but I tend to buy the pre-cut patches for that, as it looks neater. I've also been known to put bits where accessories might rub, like back of the seat post where a saddle bag can rub.

Also on the inside of the stays where a tyre might rub if the wheel gets a bit out of true - you might not notice at the time, but find a nasty wear mark later...

Some of my bikes have a nice wide strip along the bottom of the down tube and bottom bracket, to prevent chips from flicked stones.
webbo - on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to LastBoyScout:

> Drive side chain-stay - tape all round, as chain can flick up as well as down. I've also got a bit on the non-drive side to prevent heal rub, on the off-chance my foot slips.

> Wherever the cables might rub, but I tend to buy the pre-cut patches for that, as it looks neater. I've also been known to put bits where accessories might rub, like back of the seat post where a saddle bag can rub.

> Also on the inside of the stays where a tyre might rub if the wheel gets a bit out of true - you might not notice at the time, but find a nasty wear mark later...

> Some of my bikes have a nice wide strip along the bottom of the down tube and bottom bracket, to prevent chips from flicked stones.

Would it not have been easier just to leave it covered by the packaging.
LastBoyScout on 19 Jun 2017
In reply to webbo:

> Would it not have been easier just to leave it covered by the packaging.

:-D Bit tricky to ride them like that, though.

Most of that has come from experience and kicking myself about avoidable damage.
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webbo - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to LastBoyScout:
What sort of riding are you doing not to notice your wheel rubbing on the frame. I can usually notice straight away if the wheel rubs on the brake blocks.
exiled_northerner - on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to MikeSP:

> For anything else remember a scuffed bike is a loved bike.

Exactly!! It's only really worth it for chain stay and anywhere that you might be attaching stuff; eg bars for lights, computer etc, seat post for seat bag, attachment points on top/down/seat tube if using a frame bag etc.

What's this with heel rub on the non-drive side of the drive chain?!
LastBoyScout on 20 Jun 2017
In reply to webbo:

> What sort of riding are you doing not to notice your wheel rubbing on the frame. I can usually notice straight away if the wheel rubs on the brake blocks.

Hit a pothole rather hard - invisible in the dark under a bridge. No obvious damage at first, but I'd actually caused a micro crack in the rim and over the remaining miles home, one of the spokes started to pull the nipple through the rim, meaning the wheel went out of true enough to catch the inside of the chainstay, didn't notice it catching the brake blocks at the time.

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