/ 3D printing climbing holds from famous climbs

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SenzuBean - on 14 Jul 2017
Is nearly upon us: https://www.climbing.com/gear/3-d-printing-the-future-of-climbing-holds/

Are there any famous holds that you would like to see recreated for indoor enjoyment?

There aren't very many that I can think of. Tody's Wall (the hold) and Chequer's Buttress (the stuff on the arete) both have some unique holds that would translate well to plastic. What else?
snoop6060 - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

The crack on London wall?
MischaHY - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

I think that this is much more applicable to rock like limestone where the variation of holds is so much higher.
veteye on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

What about the bits broken off Right Unconquerable and others in the category? Of course controversial.
WaterMonkey - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

Toys R Us have a respectable looking 3D printer for £199.

Anybody want to take a punt and have a go at printing some holds?
jkarran - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

> Are there any famous holds that you would like to see recreated for indoor enjoyment?

Can't really think of any individual holds worth recreating for the sake of recreating them. Maybe one from an old favourite problem I miss but that was basically the clean cut lower edge of a glassy 45deg slab that had to be pinched and pawed carefully when conditions were just right.

> There aren't very many that I can think of. Tody's Wall (the hold) and Chequer's Buttress (the stuff on the arete) both have some unique holds that would translate well to plastic. What else?

A shelf and some bulbous jugs, really?
jk
kipper12 - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

I suppose if you were to print a grit hamming hold, a liberal addition of sand would be necessary
Andy Hardy on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

Maybe John Redhead could print one of the flake on IF, don't know what he'd stick it on with though...
bouldery bits - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

The monkey paw on the Wave problem at Bonehill please.
bouldery bits - on 14 Jul 2017
In reply to Andy Hardy:

> Maybe John Redhead could print one of the flake on IF, don't know what he'd stick it on with though...

BANTOR
ads.ukclimbing.com
Cake on 15 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:
Would you have to take a plaster-cast of the hold first? Or is there a more advanced way these days?

My vote might be for the jug on L'Horla.

What about the Stormbringer mantel hold? Not done it.
mkean - on 15 Jul 2017
In reply to Cake:

There are various methods of generating the 3d model from photographs or Lidar (laser distance measuring) or repeatedly dunking it into a tank of water and measuring the displacement although the later would require a big bucket to do all of Stannage Edge in one go.
Lord_ash2000 - on 15 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:
It's an interesting topic for me as someone who works in 3D graphics and within the climbing industry.

Scanning holds from real rock is possible although it might be more practical to take a mold and scan that back in the office but that would some what defeat the object of 3D printing it if you've already got a mould.

What's more interesting is that you can generate your own 3D models to make detailed custom shapes which would be too complex or finely detailed to hand sculpt. You could then 3D print those and make your production moulds from those 3D prints.

However I think the big advantage of hand caving is that it is a much more tactile process. You are constantly holding and feeling the hold as it forms and you can adjust it as you go to have well fitting and comfortable shaped form which is going to feel right in the hand, which after all is end purpose of a climbing hold. I guess you could scan in the finished hand caved mould and then add additional fine details such as patterns, designs or logos and then re print but how much demand there would be for this is another thing.

So I think although holds could be made from 3D printed moulds it'll probably only be done on specialised custom holds and the like.
Post edited at 10:46
3leggeddog on 15 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

There is a really nice purple slope at Keswick wall, how about scanning and printing that.
pasbury on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

The full set off The Very Big and The Very Small -should be dirt cheap.
Dave Garnett - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to pasbury:

> The full set off The Very Big and The Very Small -should be dirt cheap.

You can make a copy of those on an ordinary printer.
bedspring on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to SenzuBean:

One off this climb Thomas (S 4a)

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