/ Armed Police?

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
Ridge - on 16 Jul 2017
Firstly a disclaimer. I've used and carried firearms, I don't subscribe to the 'all guns are bad' viewpoint and regretfully I see the need to have groups of coppers wandering around with G36's in the event someone decides to get stabby/try to detonate in the name of Allah.

However tonight a friend posted the obligatory FB photo of posing with a copper, in this case at the Bryan Adams gig in Carlisle. Could anyone tell me the reason why the police might need to launch:

A. Baton rounds;
B. Tear Gas;
C. 40mm grenades.

Into a crowd of mostly middle aged punters at Carlisle racecourse? Or is is a case of send someone down with a thing that looks like it goes bang to 'reassure' the public?
henwardian - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

> Or is is a case of send someone down with a thing that looks like it goes bang to 'reassure' the public?

Hard to say without a link to the photo but while batons and hand cuffs are probably not needed, I'd say there is good reason for a variety of fragmentation and high-explosive grenades.
FactorXXX - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:
FFS, it's a Bryan Adams gig.
The cops were briefed to use any means necessary to stop him from performing this:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZGoWtY_h4xo
Post edited at 02:51
The Lemming - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

You've hit the nail on the head

Bryan Adams and middle aged men.

Teach the rest a lesson to grow old with dignity
1philjones1 - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:
Maybe because a firearms incident can quickly turn into a seige and they don't want to have to run back to the munitions safe in their car to get extra kit, leaving the terrorist/baddie to run off to kill more people?
The Lemming - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to 1philjones1:

> Maybe because a firearms incident can quickly turn into a seige and they don't want to have to run back to their car to get extra doughnuts.

Fixed that for you

1philjones1 - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Thanks- bloody spellchecker!
Queenie - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to henwardian:

I reckon they have been smoke grenades, rather than the fragmentation variety.
mike123 - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:
Likewise at keswick mountain festival , the two blokes on duty looked like they d stepped straight off the cover of " special forces and special forcing monthly " . Whereas apart from two women on horses who looked like they meant buisness , the police lining at the streets after Radiohead in manchester a couple of weeks ago looked a bit , well, half hearted . Maybe Cumbria police have a load of ordnance about to go out of date ?
mike123 - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to FactorXXX:
Gave your post a like without clicking the link .
ByEek on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

Maybe police are like many climbers at Stanage who despite considering a route that clearly only needs small wires and friends takes a full rack with 20 quick draws and two sets of hexes?

On a more serious note though, I think it is more of a deterrent and the fact you have posted on here shows their tactic is working. Remember Manchester just over a month ago? Terrorist don't care what sort of sh1t music is being listened to.
Tony Jones - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

I had the misfortune to be travelling by train to Carlisle yesterday afternoon and, judging by the waistlines of most of the attendees, I suspect that there was going to be a disturbance at the gates because they wouldn't be able to fit all the ticket holders into Bitts Park. Also, the party that were in my carriage, plainly thought it was still the summer of '69 and that smoking in the toilet of a train was socially acceptable (and legal).

Unleash the full force of Cumbria Police upon them for having such appalling taste in music, I say.
cander - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Fatties don't get guns.
cander - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:
All non lethal weapons, provides a range of options for the firearms officer. Obvious really.
off-duty - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to mike123:

> Likewise at keswick mountain festival , the two blokes on duty looked like they d stepped straight off the cover of " special forces and special forcing monthly " . Whereas apart from two women on horses who looked like they meant buisness , the police lining at the streets after Radiohead in manchester a couple of weeks ago looked a bit , well, half hearted . Maybe Cumbria police have a load of ordnance about to go out of date ?

Shocking they looked half hearted. It's almost like they've been working non-stop 12 hour shifts with all leave cancelled.
rj_townsend on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

I'd have thought that the fact that the recent Manchester bombing was at a concert, a relatively easy target, would answer your question for you. Terrorists don't go for a particular demographic - their remit is to strike wherever, whenever.
Dauphin on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to mike123:

Making an effort for the hot climber clunge, Radiohead fans....maybe not.

D
Ridge - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to rj_townsend:

> I'd have thought that the fact that the recent Manchester bombing was at a concert, a relatively easy target, would answer your question for you. Terrorists don't go for a particular demographic - their remit is to strike wherever, whenever.

My question was regarding the choice of weapon. Obviously I can understand why you'd want to shoot a knife/gun/suicide-vest attired wankpuffin should they start running around in public; hence I have no problem with seeing police armed with assault rifles, SMGs or pistols at these venues.

However I can't see how, in a terrorist scenario, someone would think "Quick, get the big single shot, inaccurate weapon and fire a hard plastic dildo at the terrorists".

I take cander's point that it's a less lethal option, but the police on the mainland UK have been very, very reluctant to use baton rounds, even in riots where petrol bombs are flying about and the lives of the public and police are at serious risk.

Maybe that policy has changed, and TBH I'd much rather the police were able to flatten very violent individuals at a distance should the need arise, rather than put officers at risk by having to get in close with tasers and pava sprays. Just seems a strange bit of kit to be wandering about with.
Fredt on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

WTF does WFT mean?
TobyA on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to rj_townsend:

> Terrorists don't go for a particular demographic - their remit is to strike wherever, whenever.

Have you done a survey or something?



Ridge - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to TobyA:

Whenever, wherever
We're meant to be together
I'll be there and you'll be near
And that's the deal my dear

From a speech by Abu Shakira
THE.WALRUS - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

To answer your question:

G36 - shooting people, obviously. I.e. terrorist with a gun.

Baton Gun and Tear Gas - 'less leathal option', allows them disarm violent people without having to kill them. I.e. Nut job with a machete.

40mm grenades - are actually 9-bang destraction grenades, for building clearance. I.e. terrorist taking pot-shots from a window, they'd chuck the 9-bangs in before they cleared the building, to give them a chance of comming out alive.

They'd also have a Tazer as a third less lethal option for close range and a Glock 17 for confined spaces and incase the 36 malfunctions.
TobyA on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

I like that Shakira I do. She's Colombian isn't she? So possibly a terrorist of the Carlos-the-Jakal-much-better-dressed-back-then kind.
Ridge - on 16 Jul 2017
In reply to THE.WALRUS:

Thanks for that, answers my original question.
jkarran - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to ByEek:

> On a more serious note though, I think it is more of a deterrent and the fact you have posted on here shows their tactic is working. Remember Manchester just over a month ago? Terrorist don't care what sort of sh1t music is being listened to.

How do armed police deter suicide attackers?

How does Ridge posting on here show that 'armed deterrent' tactic is working? You could maybe argue the 'armed reassurance' tactic is working except he doesn't sound especially reassured by the choices they've made.

My local police recently trialed their 'terror reassurance' program, they put horses on packed pedestrianised streets. Day one a horse trampled a baby in a pram and the plan was rapidly put back in the box marked 'who the hell thought that was a good idea and what had they been smoking?'. Thankfully the baby survived.
jk
ads.ukclimbing.com
Stichtplate on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> How do armed police deter suicide attackers?

They don't necessarily deter them, they shoot them dead as at Borough Market.

> My local police recently trialed their 'terror reassurance' program, they put horses on packed pedestrianised streets. Day one a horse trampled a baby in a pram and the plan was rapidly put back in the box marked 'who the hell thought that was a good idea and what had they been smoking?'. Thankfully the baby survived.

Yeah , police horses! Sounds really stupid doesn't it? Until you consider that at the riders height they can see over the heads of packed crowds and guide armed response units onto knife wielding wankpuffins , and hopefully shoot them before they stab too many innocents.

The police aren't stupid and they have to train for all sorts of horrible scenarios, some we've already seen played out on our streets and some we haven't.

ByEek on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> How do armed police deter suicide attackers?

A fair question. But a suicide bomber isn't much use if they get shot before reaching their target.
jkarran - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to ByEek:

> A fair question. But a suicide bomber isn't much use if they get shot before reaching their target.

Depends how their device is triggered and how populous the approach to the target is. Even getting shot without detonating gets you the press/government/social media knee-jerk and chips away at social cohesion and freedom.
jk
toad - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> Depends how their device is triggered and how populous the approach to the target is. Even getting shot without detonating gets you the press/government/social media knee-jerk and chips away at social cohesion and freedom.

> jk

Doesn't even need to be there anymore. Walked past Trent Bridge this morning, and for the first time ever there were blockades and anti- vehicle barriers everywhere - enough to raise a teeny bit of stress, without there even being a physical threat. I daresay there were armed plod as well, but all I saw were a few stewards and a couple of PCSOs, but it was early and I tend to give the area a wide berth once it fills up with punters
jkarran - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> They don't necessarily deter them, they shoot them dead as at Borough Market.

I asked someone a question in response to their statement. Firearms teams on foot patrol in cities is largely about the visuals, about being seen to be doing something.

> Yeah , police horses! Sounds really stupid doesn't it? Until you consider that at the riders height they can see over the heads of packed crowds and guide armed response units onto knife wielding wankpuffins , and hopefully shoot them before they stab too many innocents.

Fine but that was explicitly not what they were on the streets for. It was day one of a pre-publicised drive to increase the visibility of muscular policing (for want of a better description) to reassure the public. It was ill conceived by their own admission and went horribly wrong on day one.

> The police aren't stupid and they have to train for all sorts of horrible scenarios, some we've already seen played out on our streets and some we haven't.

I don't suppose they are. That said, individuals and organisations are not immune to making poor decisions for a variety of reasons irrespective of how smart they are. None of the cops I know/knew are daft or infallible.
jk
Stichtplate on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> Depends how their device is triggered and how populous the approach to the target is. Even getting shot without detonating gets you the press/government/social media knee-jerk and chips away at social cohesion and freedom.

> jk

A successful suicide bombing , like a Manchester Arena chips away a social cohesion.
Suicide attackers shot dead in an 8 minute response time reassures the public.

If not armed response units , how do you think we should approach the wankpuffins? Counselling or the naughty step.
jkarran - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> A successful suicide bombing , like a Manchester Arena chips away a social cohesion.

Do you think I'm arguing it doesn't?

> Suicide attackers shot dead in an 8 minute response time reassures the public.

It reassures the public the police (at least the Met' in central London) are capable of dealing with an unsophisticated spree killing before the number injured or killed hits triple figures. The attack, even one 'less successful' (a distasteful phrase in context) is still very effective at triggering responses and dividing society.

> If not armed response units , how do you think we should approach the wankpuffins? Counselling or the naughty step.

I think we should use the word wankpuffin a little more sparingly for starters. I'm not arguing against having armed response units widely available, they are one prong of an appropriate response to that problem. Counseling/mentoring probably is another appropriate prong of our response for some at least. I frankly don't understand how you could have got the impression I'm arguing against having a police armed response readily available.
jk
Post edited at 12:40
Stichtplate on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

Fair enough. But personally I love the word wankpuffin when referring to these criminals. To call them terrorists lends them legitimacy. Lone wolf attacker is even worse in playing to the fantasies of these sad inadequates.
The usual profile of these attackers is drug using , petty criminal thugs and scum. Wankpuffin suits them fine . Don't really see why you'd object. Are you concerned with hurting their feelings?
drunken monkey - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

40mm Grenades? I take it, yer being sarcastic
Ridge - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to drunken monkey:

> 40mm Grenades? I take it, yer being sarcastic

The cop in question was lovingly holding what looked like a HK69 or similar. My first thought was baton rounds or tear gas, but grenades, (or D cell batteries...) are an option.

Posting my OP when pissed at 2 A.M meant it wasn't particularly clear what I was dribbling on about, but openly wandering around with that bit of kit struck me as a bit odd. Seems to mark a shift in what's routinely acceptable.
Albert Tatlock - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to THE.WALRUS:

Mr Walrus

You need to change your user name to Rambo

Kind regards

Albert T

off-duty - on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

Surprised you consider deploying mounted to a city centre pedestrianised precinct such an obviously terrible idea.
I've seen them deployed in city centres fairly routinely.
Usually a centre of attention for families.
TobyA on 17 Jul 2017
In reply to off-duty:
> Surprised you consider deploying mounted to a city centre pedestrianised precinct such an obviously terrible idea.

Have you lot here resolved the issue of not leaving steaming piles of horse shit all over the pavement and particularly cycle paths of your fair city? Helsinki police department never seemed to have worked that one out, or indeed even consider it! I got quite good at dodging the ever present piles on the cycle paths, it was a slightly disgusting sign that summer was arriving when the horse poo started appearing!


L bearman68 - on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

Yeah , police horses! Sounds really stupid doesn't it? Until you consider that at the riders height they can see over the heads of packed crowds and guide armed response units onto knife wielding wankpuffins , and hopefully shoot them before they stab too many innocents.

Police on stilts I reckon. Able to see over the crowd and not trample babies to death.
drunken monkey - on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

AFAIK - Police armed response units don't carry that type of kit (40mm Grenades) - and I doubt the guys from Hereford/Poole would deploy it in UK either. Certainly not in that situation.

Police units do use stun grenades though - not sure if HK69 can fire these, more likely baton or gas round like you say.
jkarran - on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to off-duty:

> Surprised you consider deploying mounted to a city centre pedestrianised precinct such an obviously terrible idea.
> I've seen them deployed in city centres fairly routinely.
> Usually a centre of attention for families.

Which is exactly how a baby got trampled. Narrow packed streets, little room to maneuver and a spooked horse that simply didn't need to be there in the first place makes for a very bad combination as your colleagues apparently now agree.

Bin wagons on the same streets are another obviously bad idea at peak times but we'll have to wait for someone to get dragged or crushed before the council are willing to concede that. At least the bin wagons are there for good reason.
jk
off-duty - on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> Which is exactly how a baby got trampled. Narrow packed streets, little room to maneuver and a spooked horse that simply didn't need to be there in the first place makes for a very bad combination as your colleagues apparently now agree.

You're not referring to the incident in York which was 3 months ago are you?
The reports I've read all suggest the horse was spooked by something and as a result reacted as horses do.

Bearing in mind that these horses are trained to deploy in riots that is undoubtedly not a good thing.

However nothing you have said explains why you are so convinced that the deployment of a horse to a city centre is an inevitable and highly predictable accident waiting to happen.

There are a few half hearted mentions of "crowds" in the articles, accompanied by descriptions of the family wandering over to the horses to see them (rather than swept into them in an overwhelming crush of people).
I can't see any apology from the police suggesting "they should never have deployed them in that area" and, indeed, no suggestion from any article that this was an obviously bad idea for a deployment.

Everything I've seen suggests the horse got startled and reacted unexpectedly and entirely outside its training.
jkarran - on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to off-duty:

Have you been to York on a summer weekend? Half the streets you struggle to get a bike through without hurting someone let alone a horse. That the horse was basically just there to look tough only makes it worse. I've no idea I they've apologised, I sincerely hope they have to the family involved. I do note they've not redeployed the horses since so lessons were clearly learned.
Jk
Stichtplate on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:
> Have you been to York on a summer weekend? Half the streets you struggle to get a bike through without hurting someone let alone a horse. That the horse was basically just there to look tough only makes it worse. I've no idea I they've apologised, I sincerely hope they have to the family involved. I do note they've not redeployed the horses since so lessons were clearly learned.

> Jk

The usual role for mounted police in the UK is crowd control. They are usually seen policing football crowds and demos, i.e. Places where people are very densely packed together.

What lessons exactly do you think Yorkshire police have learned? Not to deploy police horses in crowds?

Edit: though I must admit I do hate those horses , just standing around trying to look tough!

Post edited at 22:06
TobyA on 18 Jul 2017
In reply to drunken monkey:

> and I doubt the guys from Hereford/Poole would deploy it in UK either. Certainly not in that situation.

Brian Adams gig, no - I'm sure you are right! But I think its pretty well known that the SAS now have some people based in London supporting the police http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/london-terror-attack-sas-blue-thunder-unit-helicopter... "Blue Thunder" is a bit of a crap name though isn't it? Particularly for anyone who has watched Tropic Thunder!
drunken monkey - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to TobyA:

I know - I was more making the point that 40mm grenades would be very unlikely to be used in UK.
jkarran - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> The usual role for mounted police in the UK is crowd control. They are usually seen policing football crowds and demos, i.e. Places where people are very densely packed together.
> What lessons exactly do you think Yorkshire police have learned? Not to deploy police horses in crowds?

I presume the lesson they've learned is to reserve their horses for crowd control, a role in which they are supposed to barge, trample and intimidate out of control crowds rather than deploying them as half ton PR props. As with most crowd control there are risks and benefits in using horses, but in an unruly crowd the practical benefits generally outweigh the risks, the same simply is not true where the deployment is purely symbolic and to a densely packed confined space.
jk
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> I presume the lesson they've learned is to reserve their horses for crowd control, a role in which they are supposed to barge, trample and intimidate out of control crowds

You've got some really weird ideas about British policing.
jkarran - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> You've got some really weird ideas about British policing.

Ever seen a police horse being used to control an angry crowd? I have. They don't use them as a platform to ask nicely for people to behave better, it's physical and there are real risks!
jk
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> Ever seen a police horse being used to control an angry crowd? I have. They don't use them as a platform to ask nicely for people to behave better, it's physical and there are real risks!

> jk

I've seen police horses at football matches ,demos and just plodding around town centres. My own daughters were delighted to meet a couple of them in the centre of Manchester a few months ago. I've never seen them barging, trampling or intimidating people. In fact the last time I can remember a police horse charge was at Orgreave 30 years ago.
Police horses need to be regularly habituated to city centres, crowds and traffic ,otherwise when they are needed operationally they would be more of a liability than an asset.

Most organisations don't ditch sound policy because of a single freak accident.
ads.ukclimbing.com
jkarran - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> I've seen police horses at football matches ,demos and just plodding around town centres. My own daughters were delighted to meet a couple of them in the centre of Manchester a few months ago.

Lovely. I like horses too, I spent a lot of my youth around them.

> I've never seen them barging, trampling or intimidating people. In fact the last time I can remember a police horse charge was at Orgreave 30 years ago.

They may not regularly deploy them into crowds but that is what they're there for when required, they're big physical and potentially dangerous animals, they're maintained by the police for that physicality.

> Police horses need to be regularly habituated to city centres, crowds and traffic ,otherwise when they are needed operationally they would be more of a liability than an asset.

I have no problem with that in a more open context but again, I'm referring specifically to narrow medieval streets often so congested with pedestrians it's difficult to safely push a bicycle and to a role where they were purely symbolic.

> Most organisations don't ditch sound policy because of a single freak accident.

But accidents do lead to reviews which may conclude the policy was not in hindsight sound.
jk
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:


> They may not regularly deploy them into crowds but that is what they're there for when required, they're big physical and potentially dangerous animals, they're maintained by the police for that physicality.

Police horses are maintained for a variety of reasons, deployment as an offensive asset are vanishingly rare occurrences.

> I have no problem with that in a more open context but again, I'm referring specifically to narrow medieval streets often so congested with pedestrians it's difficult to safely push a bicycle and to a role where they were purely symbolic.

It may come as a surprise but narrow medieval streets were no strangers to horse traffic.

toad - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Ridge:

I thought police forces were ditching mounted sections because they were poor value for money. I know Notts has (literally) put theirs out to grass
GrahamD - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to toad:

Why have I got this mental pictures of a load of coppers wandering round a meadow ? but I assume its actually the horses rather than the mounted section out to graze ?
jonnie3430 - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> They may not regularly deploy them into crowds but that is what they're there for when required, they're big physical and potentially dangerous animals, they're maintained by the police for that physicality.

Given that the police in Northern Ireland are the UK experts in riot control, and they don't use horses, I think they are more an anachronism than what you suggest.
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:

> Given that the police in Northern Ireland are the UK experts in riot control, and they don't use horses, I think they are more an anachronism than what you suggest.

Bit of a special case in NI where any civil unrest often had a few guns and nail bombs thrown into the mix. Mounted police just presented as an especially easy target.
jkarran - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:
> Given that the police in Northern Ireland are the UK experts in riot control, and they don't use horses, I think they are more an anachronism than what you suggest.

Yet there are still lots of them and they're regularly deployed to events and protests. Northern Ireland had and still has some unique policing challenges. At the height of the war road patrols were impossible in some areas, armoured vehicles and heavily armed police using tactics more befitting the military than a civil police service for even simple traffic stops are still the norm for good reason. I'm not sure wider UK policing and NI are especially comparable.
jk
Post edited at 14:02
jkarran - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Police horses are maintained for a variety of reasons, deployment as an offensive asset are vanishingly rare occurrences.

Talking to you is like nailing snot to a wall. You win.

> It may come as a surprise but narrow medieval streets were no strangers to horse traffic.

No, really! They didn't have a hundred thousand or so shoppers thronging them though did they and the local militia's health and safety policy was probably slightly different to NYP's.
jk
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> Talking to you is like nailing snot to a wall. You win.

> No, really! They didn't have a hundred thousand or so shoppers thronging them though did they and the local militia's health and safety policy was probably slightly different to NYP's.

> jk

Let's call it a draw (it's just possible that on a slow day at work I might enjoy a good argument a bit too much )
jonnie3430 - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Bit of a special case in NI where any civil unrest often had a few guns and nail bombs thrown into the mix. Mounted police just presented as an especially easy target.

They present just as easy a target here too.
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:

> They present just as easy a target here too.

From Wikipedia- by 1983 the RUC was the most dangerous police force to serve in across the globe. Over 300 dead and 9000 injured.

Do you see why the retention of mounted police might not have been a good idea in such a situation?
jonnie3430 - on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Do you see why the retention of mounted police might not have been a good idea in such a situation?

Do you see why the rest should follow suit?
Stichtplate on 19 Jul 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:
> Do you see why the rest should follow suit?

no.
Post edited at 17:00
off-duty - on 20 Jul 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> I presume the lesson they've learned is to reserve their horses for crowd control, a role in which they are supposed to barge, trample and intimidate out of control crowds rather than deploying them as half ton PR props. As with most crowd control there are risks and benefits in using horses, but in an unruly crowd the practical benefits generally outweigh the risks, the same simply is not true where the deployment is purely symbolic and to a densely packed confined space.

> jk

They provide a large physical block to crowds and people get the he'll out of the way when they move - however slowly that is.
They are very effective at "herding" from the rear and guiding from the front of any march.

They are also often largely static in large crowds for example football fans leaving/entering stadiums.

As is clearly stated in the reports one got spooked. Something I haven't seen before and something that certainly isn't compatible with public order policing, whether it is your wilder view or mine. The principle feature of that type of policing being control.

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.