/ Coast to coast - gaiters?

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genericflipper - on 01 Aug 2017
Hi, planning to do coast to coast from st bees as far as Shap next week, with higher level options. Carrying all own kit so trying to keep weight down. Should i bring gaiters or leave them at home? Any experience much appreciated. Thanks, Neil
angry pirate - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

I've not done the coast to coast but have done a few long distance walks and I always leave the gaiters behind just to save the weight.
If it's raining, on go the overtrousers. If I'm bog trotting, I just accept a wee bit of mud on the bottom of my trousers. After a few days they're mucky anyway and I have a clean dry pair in the pack for evenings / pubs etc.
r0b on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

From memory there is not too much boggy ground on that section - from Lining Crag to the top of Easdale is the only section that springs to mind as a bit soggy - so I think you'll be OK without
ben b - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Back in the day I wore Scarpa Mantas with Yeti Attak gaiters all the way. In July.

This was not wise, but in my defence, in those innocent days (28 years ago) I only had one pair of boots - simple times!

I don't think gaiters are required...

b
Rob Exile Ward on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

You've only got to ask yourself one thing. Do they look cool? No, they certainly don't. So bin 'em!

(Personally nowadays I just use ankle length gaiters - 'stop tous' as the French say - to stop rain and stones going in and the top of my boots, and those work fine.)
Dauphin on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Take em...Not boggy but it's not called the lakes because it doesn't rain. Walked through 2-3 inches of rain water running off the western fells into Ennerdale, guys doing the c2c in trainers didn't look happy. Haweswater section was like being in trawler in a force 8.

D
brianjcooper on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:


> (Personally nowadays I just use ankle length gaiters

I'm guesses you don't do much bog trotting then? Not sure how 'stop tous' would fare across Kinder and Bleaklow after heavy rain.
ByEek on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Not required. At least not 24 years ago anyway.
Rob Exile Ward on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to brianjcooper:

You are absolutely correct. And I don't miss it a bit!
Clint86 - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Its beginning to look like a dryish forecast for next week, so on that basis, I'd leave them.
BnB - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to brianjcooper:

> I'm guesses you don't do much bog trotting then? Not sure how 'stop tous' would fare across Kinder and Bleaklow after heavy rain.

They're fine for postholing in Scottish winter so they'll stop a bit of peat, believe me. I live on those moors and never bother with gaiters.
GrahamD - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Personally I always had lightweigt cheapy nylon gaiters for long distance paths. One missed boggy patch and risking days on end of soggy feet is a right ball ache. Overtrousers are great but have a knack of funnelling water into the top of your boots without gaiters underneath unless you are careful.
brianjcooper on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> You are absolutely correct. And I don't miss it a bit!

Dave Perry - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

I've just done the whole of the C to C for the 3rd time (leading groups)

I generally carry them, they can be handy in long wet grass, but mostly I don't bother with them. As for 'boggy' bits there's no where you are likely to sink in over normal boots.
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no_more_scotch_eggs - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Coast to coast gaiters...?! How long are your legs?!

Howard - on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

You are going to one of the wettest parts of the UK. They are essential. Take them.
Dave the Rave on 01 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Year round for me. The adders are abundant this year.
Simon Caldwell - on 02 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

For me, gaiters are for winter snow. In summer they just lead to sweaty legs. But everyone's different, so the answer depends largely on how much you use gaiters at this time of year for normal day walks.
GrahamD - on 02 Aug 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> ..how much you use gaiters at this time of year for normal day walks.

I'd say a multiday route is slightly different as the consequence of a boot full of sludge on day one is a bit more of an issue than if its just one day squelching about with wet feet.
Simon Caldwell - on 02 Aug 2017
In reply to GrahamD:

Each to their own. I'd be happy with getting my feet wet. But then I'd also be wearing fell shoes for a multi day walk, and they dry out much quicker.
GrahamD - on 02 Aug 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> Each to their own.

Indeed. Just pointing out why a multi-day might be considered (by some, me included) in a different way to a single day walk.
genericflipper - on 03 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

thanks for all the replies, really much appreciated.

stick em in the car and make a decision on the day I reckon....
L Scallop on 04 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:
I live in sight of Dent your first fell on the way and it been in clag and heavy rain most of the last week and the bog in the dip at the top is pretty bad atm and well walked prepare for wet feet you will sink to ankle depth if onLy wearing short boots ect.

Otherwise try to skirt round the sides if you can ;)
Post edited at 14:30
genericflipper - on 04 Aug 2017
In reply to Scallop:

Thanks for the heads up...
Dave Perry - on 05 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Excellent advice from Scallop. No problem avoiding boggy bits and you are unlikely to get wet feet at all as long as you wear waterproof boots. I think I've only worn mine two or three times in 4 crossing and that was when it had been, or was raining and we were likely to be walking through long grass such as silage fields in early summer/spring.
Wainers44 - on 05 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

All depends on your boots.

Good boots and with a bit of care and no gaiters you will keep dry feet pretty much anywhere.

Cheap boots and even just dampish ground and I would take them.

The only two bits of the Lakes I have ever thought gaiters were really needed are Green Crag and surroundings towards Devoke Water, and the midden, sorry middle of the Central Fells.
Dauphin on 06 Aug 2017
In reply to Dave Perry:

you are unlikely to get wet feet at all as long as you wear waterproof boots.

Shirley some mistake?

D
Dave Perry - on 08 Aug 2017
In reply to Dauphin:

You've gone over my head Dauphin. Unless you were referring to my next sentence, which could have been made clearer...... "I think I've only worn my GAITORS two or three times
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L Scallop on 10 Aug 2017

I Walked up Dent lastnight.

If your going west to east, after the two cairns you will hit the bog, but some nice walkers have been moving rock from the nearby wall, just go to the right when you see the path.

Linethwaite is pretty boggy also, just after you go under the railway bridge but if you have decent boots you will be fine.

I walked from St Bees lighthouse today and home from the back of dent via Uldale, Rain tomorrow 11 Aug. But looks like a deccent forcast for the next week or so.
Post edited at 17:25
Jim C - on 11 Aug 2017
In reply to genericflipper:

Before I embark on a planned longer term bigger trip, walking or cycling, I do a test pack and include all my luxury items then Inremove them and weigh it again .
I then over the weeks or months available , try and lose that weight before I go, and in doing so I also get fitter so if I have made the weight loss, all luxuries go back in the pack.
Dauphin on 11 Aug 2017
In reply to Dave Perry:

Waterproof boots i.e. gore Tex lined imo are the the worst for the temperate and very wet u.k. climate - once they are wet they stay wet.

Maybe it's me and I often tend to walk in wet places without a path - Scotland.

D
Dave Perry - on 19:48 Thu
In reply to Dauphin:

Yes maybe, but then I can't recall ever getting Goretex lined boots wet inside to start with.

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