/ Destination article: Advice

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Jamie Simpson - on 09 Aug 2017
Hi,

For quite sometime I have been trying to write a destination article about the Jotunheim mountains in Norway.

I just keep getting bogged down in to much details or not enough.

When reading a destination article, would readers prefer loads of details about routes or just an overview?

Whats the key info you would really want to read about?

How does one go about creating a map that can be used to aid the reading in getting a prospective of the mountains within the landscape?

Any advice greatly appreciated.
summo on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamie Simpson:
I would say an overvoverview. An example of both a hard and easy route or touring trip. Cover the winter and summer options. The same with accommodation and food options, as cost is a bit of a factor. Flight or travel connections.

Most people aren't going to go for a long trip, so I'd focus on the 'must do' options, rather than the whole range. Finally a bit on climate, some hints on kit.

Map; Local tourist office might have something from their literature that they own the rights to, when you explain the article is in effect promoting tourism.
Post edited at 09:56
Toerag - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamie Simpson:

You can save space by mentioning routes that are shown elsewhere on the interweb (maybe in the logs here) and linking to them?
nniff - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamie Simpson:

IMHO one needs:

Enough about the location itself for you to decide if it's suitable for you and perhaps some of the main attraction routes. Thereafter, most people will acquire a guidebook and so a steer in the right direction for that is always useful unless it's obvious.

So far, so good. The next challenges are when to go, how to get there and most importantly where to stay. Dependent on the nature of the climbing, prime season and non-starter seasons are good to know. For me, getting somewhere is usually flight and hire car - usually straightforward unless there are any local pecularities or good alternatives. The tricky one is frequently accommodation. It's easier with the internet than it used to be, but a steer towards good places to stay and web links is invaluable, especially if an internet search steers you towards five star hotels or villas or the language is challenging.

It's always good to know those things that would eventually work out for yourself. For example, at the last place I went to, it would have been handy to know that it's an hour and a half walk, so the natives mostly start walking an hour and a half before first light to get on the route of their choice. Didn't take long to work out, but it's an easy hint.
Robert Durran - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Jamie Simpson:

Aim primarily to inspire people. You can always answer peoples' specific questions in the attached thread afterwards.
Big Lee - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to nniff:

> Enough about the location itself for you to decide if it's suitable for you and perhaps some of the main attraction routes. Thereafter, most people will acquire a guidebook and so a steer in the right direction for that is always useful unless it's obvious.

Unfortunately the Jotenheim guidebook is honestly the most uninspiring that have ever read. Very little passion or opinion in the writing. An overview of recommended routes at various grades would be very useful I reckon.
nniff - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Big Lee:

That's worth knowing in its own right and so proving a more info and local colour is well worth doing
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