/ Reliable budget brands for workshop tools

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Philip on 09 Aug 2017
For hand power tools I've splashed out on desalt as I get the value in regular use, but I'm kitting out my shed/workshop for occasional woodwork as a hobby. For pillar drill, table saw and planer/thicknesses what brands are reliable but obviously not built for day to day pro use. I don't mind paying for features but I don't think I'll get the value out of a £500+ item.

I recognise Clarke and Draper, but there are plenty of no-name Chinese models. Don't want to end up with some non-square or too flimsy to give a true 90 degree angle.

I think my first project is going to be making a beehive ready for next year. Not looking to get into cabinet making any time soon.
Alex Riley on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

I just bought a table saw from Lidl for £60, a few small adjustments (removing safety guard and improving the fence) and its working well and is accurate.
peppermill - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

I've had a few things from Silverline (Compound Mitre Saw, workbench and a few other bits and bobs) deffo cheap and cheerful but none of it has been a 'Buy cheap buy twice' situation.

Rolson also make decent enough stuff
Oceanrower - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

Erbaur, which is pretty much the Screwfix own brand, are pretty good for budget level stuff. Most of my gear is Makita but I've got an Erbaur router and a couple of sanders and they've been reliable.

PLEASE don't go near Ryobi. Biggest pile of shit going.

Philip on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Oceanrower:

Thanks all. What about Scheppach? I'm looking to build dust extraction soon, now I'm working inside, and wanted to make life easier by buying the brand most likely to for the tools I'll get.
mkean - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

Maybe worth looking at second hand, charities like Tools for Self Reliance often sell refurbished powertools. For new stuff some of the cheaper brands like Titan are more than capable of doing a decent job if you invest some time into engineering out the design flaws (like flimsy fences) but I think it comes down to whether you enjoy the tinkering time.
mkean - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

For dust extraction get a cyclone (dust deputy or similar) as a pre-separator unless you really like replacing hepa filters regularly.
Alasdair Fulton - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Oceanrower:
I second the Ryobi statement. I have a jigsaw which is ok, but the orbital sander is not very good.

Erbauer do seem alright (I'd go for them over ryobi any time).

Don't overlook second hand! You can often pick up old professional quality tools quite cheap.
Post edited at 21:25
keith-ratcliffe on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:
We bought a Sheppach wood turning lathe which has been a real workhorse - we bought spare drive belts as well but not yet needed them.
Dax H - on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to Oceanrower:

> PLEASE don't go near Ryobi. Biggest pile of shit going.

I have had a couple of Ryobi drills, one 10mm chuck and one sds hammer drill and a Cordless angle grinder and they gave me many years service before some tw*t broke in to my workshop.

Currently got a Ryobi Cordless hammer drill and it too works fine, had it about 2 years now.
Philip on 09 Aug 2017
In reply to mkean:

> For dust extraction get a cyclone (dust deputy or similar) as a pre-separator unless you really like replacing hepa filters regularly.

That's my plan, but instead of building one I'm going to buy one (probably the mini draper one). Originally I was going to make one from an old Dyson and some eBay parts but not losing the pressure drop us a challenge.
fraserbarrett - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Dax H:

I second this, I have a ryobi drill and jigsaw both of which were bought to be abused, but have outlasted the looked after Makita kit that they were supposed to be taking abuse in the place of.
Only have good things to say about them. However they don't do workshop tools as far as I know, so off topic I think?
steve taylor - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

I bought some stuff from Axminster Tools a while back and it's all still working (pillar drill, fret saw).

My Ryobi table saw has been an excellent workhorse. However, my Ryobi chainsaw was utter sh!te.
Rigid Raider - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to steve taylor:

Bizarre innit? My Ryobi battery drill is excellent; I've used DeWalt and Bosch battery drills and find the Ryobi just as good with a nice progressive trigger. My Ryobi petrol chainsaw cuts up bits of wood efficiently, just as well as chainsaws by other manufacturers I expect.
summo on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to Philip:

I've flogged a ryobi battery drill for 4 plus years on the same 2 batteries, still going we?l but think might need to swap bearings soon.

Mains belt sander has had a harder life, changed bearings a couple of months ago.

Mains cross cut going well, laser stopped working last year though.

All have far exceeded their 2 year warranty.
nniff - on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to fraserbarrett:

> I second this, I have a ryobi drill and jigsaw both of which were bought to be abused, but have outlasted the looked after Makita kit that they were supposed to be taking abuse in the place of.

> Only have good things to say about them. However they don't do workshop tools as far as I know, so off topic I think?

Exactly the same for me
Philip on 10 Aug 2017
In reply to steve taylor:

> I bought some stuff from Axminster Tools a while back and it's all still working (pillar drill, fret saw).

Good to know - their own brand looks quite good specs. I'm mainly looking for a decent table saw first of all.


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