/ Beastmaker used outside

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Keith Hague - on 31 Aug 2017
How well do you reckon a beastmaker would fare outside? If not well, does anyone have any recommendations for a suitable fingerboard?

Cheers
luke glaister - on 31 Aug 2017
In reply to Keith Hague:

I've got mine outside and cover it over with a tarpol. It's been there 3 years and still going strong. Unlike me. Lol. Much prefer to hang outside with tunes on. More so when the cold nights return.
Luke.
In reply to Keith Hague:

I would've thought it'd be OK if you made a small roof/cover to shield it from direct rain above it. They're made of pretty decent wood.
mattrm - on 31 Aug 2017
In reply to Keith Hague:

Depends obviously how exposed it will be. Any wooden fingerboard will eventually sucumb if left outdoors. If you were to cover it as Luke suggested it'll last longer. I'd also recommend some kind of finish, Danish Oil possibly. Reapply that on a regular basis.

A plastic one might be a better bet. Or as Beastmakers are Tulipwood, which is pretty much the softest commonly available hardwood, you might want to look at this:

http://crusherholds.co.uk/fingerboards/crusher-matrix-hangboard-fingerboard

You want the 'Special Iroko Mahogany Edition'. Iroko is a much more durable wood. That should last a bit better.
MischaHY - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to Keith Hague:

I think a resin board would suit better outdoors - maybe the moon one?

Really no option to mount a removable one outside?
AlanLittle - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to mattrm:

> I'd also recommend some kind of finish, Danish Oil possibly.

And then when you can one-arm an oiled 45 degreee sloper, you know you're *really* strong
MischaHY - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to AlanLittle:

Precisely my thoughts :')
Rock to Fakey - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to mattrm:

Oh great.... Mahogany.... Usually tropical rainforest has been destroyed for this. I can't see anywhere on the website saying it's been ethically sourced from a sustainable reserve. Can mahogany actually be ethically sourced / sustainable wood? I thought not easily as it takes a long time to grow.
I wouldn't buy from crusher.
Rock to Fakey - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to AlanLittle:

Wood oil soaks in, leave a while, reapply, soaks in again, loads of wood we use is oiled, should be fine, especially once chalked a bit.
Paul Crusher R - on 01 Sep 2017
In reply to Rock to Fakey:
Some facts for you... they are made from Iroko.... NOT unethically sourced Mahogany which you are implying..

http://www.timberconnection.co.uk/product/iroko/

A very commonly used material in joinery and the building trade!

Paul
Post edited at 15:14
Rock to Fakey - on 02 Sep 2017
In reply to Paul Crusher R:

Ok, apologies for that, sort of "implying" out of ignorance + querying too hence some use of ? but more implying incorrectly, but it does seem to have a misleading name then, ... Iroko Mahogany, if it's not actually Mahogany, or perhaps it really is a type of Mahogany but not from rainforest, i don't actually know, but does it explain anything to that effect for occasional numbskulls like me on the website?
mattrm - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to Rock to Fakey:

As Paul says, Iroko is commonly available in the UK. I actually have some Iroko as a worktop in my kitchen. You can go to any decent hardwood supplier in the UK and buy some. If you want to read around the subject, the wood-database site is great:

http://www.wood-database.com/iroko/

and to show how many different types of Mahogany there are you've got the 'proper' mahogany:

http://www.wood-database.com/cuban-mahogany/

But then other actually different woods, which are also called mahogany:

http://www.wood-database.com/african-mahogany/

It happens a lot, that you get a similar wood passed off as a certain type of wood. It's really odd and something you don't understand unless you're either interested or do wood working. I can rant on about the 'real wood' that Oak Furnitureland sell as well.

I'm honestly not sure why Paul mentions Mahogany on the page to be honest. Seems odd to me. Iroko is often refered to as 'African Teak', so using Teak would be a better word. As my Great Grandad was in the Royal Navy and when he left he retrained as a carpenter, so I actually have a small scrap of what I've been told was teak which he'd apparently got from one of the battleships he'd served on. Teak was used on the decks of the ships back then (specifically the Queen Elizabeth class battleships which he served upon) as it's very hardwearing. Which is why I recommended it as an outdoor finger board.

I've not bought a Crusher board myself, but they do look good. Just as good as the other wooden fingerboards out there, I'm quite sure.
Cake on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to mattrm:
I've got a crusher finger board. It's very similar to a Beastmaker board, but I've no idea about ours durability outdoors
yh001 - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Keith Hague:

I have one kept outside but covered with a tarp when not used. A bit of faff but has kept it in great condition over the past year.

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