/ Nimm !!

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paul mitchell - on 11 Sep 2017
The danger of the rhyming sounds ''Take!'' and ''Safe!'' can be removed by using a German word,even in these odious Brexit times. That word dear readers is NIMM !

We are the knights who say NIMM !

It comes from the verb nehmen,to take.
HeMa on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

This is where finnish triumps...

Take = Ota [o?ta]
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ota#Finnish (pick the verb).

Safe = e.g. Vapaa [/???p??/] (literally meanign free, as you you're free to take me off belay).
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/vapaa
jimtitt - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

Except that a German would think you are offering them a popular brand of sweet, the command used is "zu".
paul mitchell - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to jimtitt:
Hi Jim,the point is not literalist.The point is audibility and difference from the rhyming death.
Nimm is louder than zu. Wahr,oder nicht,youth?Plus,you don't see many Germans at Stanage.
Post edited at 11:07
HeMa on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

> Plus,you don't see many Germans at Stanage.

Even less finns ;).

But if audible difference is the main criteria, just do as the Yanks do... FVCK means Take and Yippee screams Safe.

radddogg - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

I once had a partner shout "take the slack" while I was out of sight at the top of a windy crag. All I could hear was "take.......slack"

We had a chat about communication after that route
WaterMonkey - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

Not In My Mountain
cb294 - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:
The German command would be "zu" (closed or tight).

I regularly went climbing with a mixed party of Germans, Brits, and Americans, which could be an interesting experience. Should we abseil/rappel that corner/Verschneidung/dihedral......

CB

"Slack" would be Seil (rope)

Post edited at 14:22
AlanLittle - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to cb294:

I have an occasional American climbing partner in Bavaria. We've decided German commands are the way of least confusion.
Lemony - on 11 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

> It comes from the word nehmen, meaning "I don't have a lighter".
AP Melbourne on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to jimtitt:

> Except that a German would think you are offering them a popular brand of sweet, the command used is "zu".

Well whatever it is just don't mention the war. I did once but I think I got away with it. B. Fawlty.
zmv - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to paul mitchell:

Does using Nimm also mean you get to a shruberry after a pitch?

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