/ Amazon Prime by stealth. :-(

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The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
Seems like Amazon are using underhanded methods to get the world to sign up to Amazon Prime.

Over the years I have been very careful not to sign up to the Prime service or to try the 30 day trial. However Amazon are trying to get people to sign up by stealth and then hope that apathy will get them new customers.

Just a Heads up, if you buy anything from Amazon and select Next Day delivery, or accidentally select Next Day delivery while placing your order, then you will automatically be signed up to the 30 day free Amazon Prime trial.

This is not good practice, in my opinion.
Timmd on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:
I thought about that, then decided I can not continue to use it after 30 days, and remembered more serious things I had to deal with. It's a small thing in the grand scheme of things I guess?
Post edited at 14:33
Tony Jones - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I accidentally signed up to a one-month trial it when placing an order a few weeks ago. I immediately cancelled my subscription so no harm done (and I did get the free next day delivery).

Sharp practice? I dunno, but it does demonstrate the need to be wary.

I'm not sure that they're necessarily the cheapest source for most things anymore either.
The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Timmd:

> I thought about that, then decided I can not continue to use it after 30 days, and remembered more serious things I had to deal with. It's a small thing in the grand scheme of things I guess?

Some people such as yourself, will think the same, and why shouldn't they?

But when it comes to the 30 day end of trial, then a big wedge of money comes out of their account and they are now happily signed up to a service that they did not ask for because of their other more serious concerns in life.
Lord_ash2000 - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I did this by mistake once too, it is very stealthy indeed. I didn't notice at all until 6 weeks later I noticed £70 had come out of my account. Once I contacted them they did refund it in full though I hadn't used any of the prime services since.
Timmd on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Is it not possible to avoid paying to sign up at the end of 30 days?
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

They make it perfectly clear that you're signing up to 30 days free and after that time you pay the subscription. If you are careless enough to accidentally sign up (and even if you do it deliberately!) they email you to tell you that you've signed up and tell you how to cancel - I don't think they come round and wipe your backside for you, yet, that's a different service provider.
Stichtplate on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:
My elderly father signed himself up by mistake. 10 monthly payments later he noticed his mistake. No joy from Amazon customer service (usually good in my experience) despite it being evident that he wasn't using the service that he was paying for.

Edit: to sir chasm- does that go for a non tech savvy 77 year old who only gets spam, so doesn't check his email?
Post edited at 15:03
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

Yes, i think the terms are the same for everyone.
Stichtplate on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:
Seems sharp practice to me, as evidenced by the number of people fooled on the tiny sample represented by this forum.

And personally, I believe that the more vulnerable members of our society should be afforded some discretion, rather than being seen as a fair opportunity for a good corporate shafting.
Post edited at 15:21
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Seems sharp practice to me, as evidenced by the number of people fooled on the tiny sampled represented by this forum.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confirmation_bias

> And personally, I believe that the more vulnerable members of our society should be afforded some discretion, rather than being seen as a fair opportunity for a good corporate shafting.

Perhaps evilamazon should ask a couple of questions before you're allowed to sign up to prime: are you old? Are you vulnerable? HAVE YOU READ WHAT YOU'RE AGREEING TO, DEAR?
Stichtplate on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

Well you've certainly confirmed my bias that you're a bit of an arse.
summo on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> Seems sharp practice to me, as evidenced by the number of people fooled on the tiny sample represented by this forum.

Would agree with sharp practice. It also shows that on a forum full of folk who moan about zero hours contracts, poor work place ethics and big corporations tax evasion.... many people still use Amazon.

radddogg - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> My elderly father signed himself up by mistake. 10 monthly payments later he noticed his mistake.

Amazon Prime is an annual subscription not monthly? Are you sure it was Amazon?
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to radddogg:

I think you can pay monthly.
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to summo:

I would like to add to your list of forum folk blindness.... salary payers of two of UKCs favourite TV presenters... Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond ;-)
Stichtplate on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

> I would like to add to your list of forum folk blindness.... salary payers of two of UKCs favourite TV presenters... Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond ;-)

...and also those who dislike the unnecessarily antagonistic and are then even worse in return.

Apologies to Sir Chasm.
Tony Jones - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to summo:

> Would agree with sharp practice. It also shows that on a forum full of folk who moan about zero hours contracts, poor work place ethics and big corporations tax evasion.... many people still use Amazon.

Guilty as charged.

I do however avoid using Amazon where possible. Their core products, books and music can usually be found at similar or lower prices elsewhere, and more and more it seems to be following the ebay model as a marketplace for third party sellers of all sorts of dubious tat.

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Tony Jones:

Amusing pic in this news article, might explain it

http://www.businessinsider.de/jeff-bezos-before-and-after?r=US&IR=T
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

No problem, it's easy to overreact on here.
The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

> They make it perfectly clear that you're signing up to 30 days free and after that time you pay the subscription.

Not any more!

I clicked the section that said that I did not want the 30 day trial, and I am careful about looking for it. However I clicked the next day delivery rather than the free delivery.

As of now, anybody who clicks the Next Day delivery then they are automatically signed up to the 30 day trial. You are only told of this with a very small insignificant sentence in a plane typeface and small text.

Shady practice and worthy of the Microsoft upgrade nastiness.
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

So you are told. Are you also emailed to say you're signed up?
Neil Henson - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I managed to accidently sign up for Amazon Prime a while back too. I managed to cancel it pretty sharpish when I realized though.

I do think their Amazon Prime sign up is stealthy and deliberately confusing as evidenced by other poster's experiences on here. I believe they got into trouble about this a while back too, but it still seems far too easy to sign up by accident.
The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

> So you are told. Are you also emailed to say you're signed up?

I was told by one sentence in a typeface with a colour and tone similar to the screen.

I did not receive an email saying that I had signed up.

Do you always have to be a cock and try to be so pedantic if you can't get your way?

Or do you smash your iccle fingers against the keyboard screaming "LISTEN TO ME!"
buzby - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

yep I got caught a few month's ago as well, its a one click sign up that is anything but clear that is definitely designed to catch you out, so I milked it for all it was worth for 28 days and then cancelled before the due date.
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

There's only one of us having a tantrum because we didn't read simple instructions.
The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

You are unbelievable!

I followed all instructions to ensure that I did not sign up to something, yet I got signed up anyway.

Why are you being so obtuse?
Sir Chasm - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

> You are unbelievable!

> I followed all instructions to ensure that I did not sign up to something, yet I got signed up anyway.

> Why are you being so obtuse?

I suppose because I think you got something wrong and don't want to admit it - it's only natural.
Alternatively Amazon really are signing people up against there will without telling them.
Greasy Prusiks on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Has anyone else heard of Amazon Prime Day?

The tin hatted part of me says that in our dystopian future of post nuclear conflict, were Amazon have become more powerful than government and Prime membership determines how water is distributed, this will be replacing Christmas.

Anyway back to bunker construction.
Lion Bakes on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Amazon does tell you, you are signig up. Perhaps if you were less hasty in your need to buy something from them you'd actually read what is on the screen.

tspoon1981 on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Is it really stealth if you select the "Free next day delivery with a free trial of Amazon Prime" option at checkout? I'm pretty sure they email the terms and conditions over too
Timmd on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Timmd:

> I thought about that, then decided I can not continue to use it after 30 days, and remembered more serious things I had to deal with. It's a small thing in the grand scheme of things I guess?

For clarity, the serious thing was helping out a mate who urgently needed something the next day via Amazon, otherwise this sounds patronising.
The Lemming - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Timmd:

On reflection, everything works out.

duchessofmalfi - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Yep, sneaky and been going on for ages, but, to their credit the few people I know caught out have all got refunds including someone who only notice after the second annual payment was taken.
Rob Exile Ward on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

D'you know, I signed up for Prime ... then cancelled. In the scheme of things, I've had bigger traumas.

Which reminds me ... I now feel I'm being penalised because I NEVER paid any PPI; I read the small print. For every other beggar it seems to have been an excellent savings scheme.
TheDrunkenBakers - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Stichtplate:

> My elderly father signed himself up by mistake. 10 monthly payments later he noticed his mistake. No joy from Amazon customer service (usually good in my experience) despite it being evident that he wasn't using the service that he was paying for.

> Edit: to sir chasm- does that go for a non tech savvy 77 year old who only gets spam, so doesn't check his email?

It's an interesting dilemma and I, as one who regularly uses Amazon and would consider myself pretty technically savvy and cautious, has nearly used myself when ordering things quickly and not really reading what I'm doing. I guess its an easy mistake to make.

Whilst Sir Chasm has, without question, a valid point that people should really be more wary about what they press I think he is being a little insensitive. What I think you should be more concerned about with your elderly relatives, and that goes for all people of mature years and perhaps less sharp mind, is that they are making transactions online with credit cards with the risk of making decisions without checking things more carefully first.
Tony Jones - on 12 Sep 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> D'you know, I signed up for Prime ... then cancelled. In the scheme of things, I've had bigger traumas.

Indeed. And so have I.

However if, say, 2% of those who sign up don't cancel immediately and then forget to cancel within thirty days, I'd say that's a fairly significant income stream for Amazon. The fact that they seem to reimburse those that question their Prime membership suggests that they are aware that it's all a bit dodgy.
Ben Sharp - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

It's been like this for years. If you click "sign up for amazon prime and get free next day delivery" then you will be signed up to the 30 day trial. If you choose next day delivery without signing up to prime (i.e. the one without the green prime logo next to it) then you wont but it will add the cost of delivery onto your bill.

Prime is fantastic by the way, I've saved a fortune on delivery costs. A reasonable selection of free films and tv as well for those of us who don't buy a tv licence.
Bulls Crack - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I've enjoyed 2 30 day trials so far - changed email between them.
DubyaJamesDubya - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

I have been offered these one month trials before. I just make sure I take up the offer around Xmas time and get the things I want quickly. Incidentally if you cancel it at the same time as you order you still get the month of quick deliveries. It seems to me that as long as you keep an eye on these things there is no down side. Incidentally you are only allowed a maximum of 1 free trial month per year so make the most of it!
DubyaJamesDubya - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

> Some people such as yourself, will think the same, and why shouldn't they?

> But when it comes to the 30 day end of trial, then a big wedge of money comes out of their account and they are now happily signed up to a service that they did not ask for because of their other more serious concerns in life.

...and they will refund your money if you've been caught out. Just cancel Prime when you place your first order, you still get the thirty days.
GridNorth - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

The thing that changed and nearly caught me out was that they altered the default choice but all the information is there if you take the time to read it. Both eBay and Amazon are getting increasingly bad reputations and rightly so but neither will change until their customer base starts to decrease. Supply and demand and all that

Al
Ian65 - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:

Yeup they almost got me (twice) with unintended Prime subscription twt I subsequently had to cancel. Final outcome? I don't use Amazon now.
CurlyStevo - on 14 Sep 2017
In reply to The Lemming:
personally I like amazon prime its not much per month and the 20 pounds minimum spend for free delivery is lifted. Also on most items I get free next day delivery. The on demand tv service included in the price is pretty descent too and makes a change from Netflix at a similar price.
Post edited at 18:26
Blue Straggler - on 11:45 Wed
In reply to The Lemming:

Thanks for flagging this up, it caught my eye and reminded me to check something peculiar.

1) I have definitely not signed up for Amazon Prime at any point, not even accidentally. I've checked my emails (nothing about it in there) and my sole Amazon account which clearly states "You are not an Amazon Prime member"
2) I got a text message from my bank warning me about a declined transaction (I was trying to withdraw money from an ATM overseas and it flagged up as "suspicious" despite my having pre-warned them I was travelling...but that's another story!). It listed "£117.94 Peru 11-9-17 Declined at a Cash Machine. £.00 AMZN PRIME MEMBER FEE Luxembourg 11-9-17 Approved"

Rather odd. I'll keep an eye on things.

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