/ Surviving a bear attack

L Prada - on 15 Sep 2017

When you are being attacked, you can still avoid worst injuries if you lay on the ground and cover your head. Your backpack, if you have one, will provide additional cover. If you have a firearm, you will likely want to defend yourself, but I can't give advice on this - bears are big, sturdy animals and it takes more than a single bullet to incapacate them, unless you shoot at a vital organ. I think forum memebers more experienced in hutning can comment on this, but rememebr, if you merely wound the bear, it will just make it angrier and more aggressive (Source: talked with a guy working in a national park in Tatry several times ;) and stupid tourists provoking bears are a regular occurence there).
Post edited at 13:54
ablackett - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Thanks.

her_t6 - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Thanks, I'm always scared I come across a bear in the UK. Very helpful information.
Darren Jackson - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Any advice on surviving a beer attack? Ta.
eschaton - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Darren Jackson:
First sentence applies i think mate.

"You can still avoid worst injuries if you lay on the ground and cover your head."
Post edited at 14:38
Martin Bennett - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

There is another way, as described in one of my favourite jokes, the punchline of which is: Bear, sated: "You're not here for the hunting are you?"
owlart - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada: Surely all you need is a bear-proof suit: http://www.improbable.com/news/2001/nov/troy-bear2.html
DerwentDiluted - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

I tend to carry a large pot of hunny.
Trangia on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Thanks, useful knowledge to have next time I go for a walk on the South Downs.
dabble on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to her_t6:

Do you frequent Canal Street often?
Crewey-Rob on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to All:
A more useful thread night be "Surviving a UKC attack" - How to react when everyone's taking the piss.
Post edited at 14:54
the sheep - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to her_t6:

> Thanks, I'm always scared I come across a bear in the UK. Very helpful information.

Best thing to do is apologise and wipe it off ;-)
Unknown Climber - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Crewey-Rob:

> A more useful thread night be "Surviving a UKC attack" - How to react when everyone's taking the piss.

Lay on the ground and cover your head. Your backpack, if you have one, will provide additional cover. If you have a firearm, you will likely want to defend yourself, but I can't give advice on this - it takes more than a single bullet to incapacate them, unless you shoot at a vital organ. I think forum memebers more experienced can comment on this, but rememebr, if you merely wound them, it will just make them angrier and more aggressive
nniff - on 15 Sep 2017
mrbird on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Unless you're Scottish and just square go the c*nt.
Wanderer100 - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Does this apply to Rom the Bear????
Spartacus on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:
I have watched 'Jungle book' many times and assure you they are not aggressive. They resemble a favourite uncle being slightly dim witted but nice.
They sing songs like 'Bear necessities' and some others I can't remember.
I think you should spend more time in the cinema researching your subject.
Kevster - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:
I came across a little bare the other night. She was playful at first, but turned a bit funny after. Using your hand pistol and accidently misfiring in a little bare's eye seems to unsettle her.
In future I'll use the correct protection when looking to engage with a playful bare.
Be careful out there.
Post edited at 17:50
FactorXXX - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Wanderer100:

Does this apply to Rom the Bear????

Quote from the OP: I think forum memebers more experienced in hutning can comment on this, but rememebr, if you merely wound the bear, it will just make it angrier and more aggressive

Yes, I think it might well apply to Rom...
Eric9Points - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to mrbird:
> Unless you're Scottish and just square go the c*nt.

My long time friend and adventurer, Sydney Mombassa, visited Yosemite with a pal of his when he was 17. One morning while they were lying in their Force 10 a black bear stuck it's head in the tent door with the intention of joining them.

Sydney immediately started making plans to exit through the back of the tent. His friend on the other hand, a Glaswegian with a black belt in karate, battered the bear in the face. It turned and ran for it.

In fact this follows the advice given for bear attacks. If it's a black bear, fight back, they're small enough that you can fend them off if you're lucky. If it's a grizzly just play dead and hope it doesn't regard you as food because there's no way you're going to scare one of those big phuqers off.

Apparently in days gone by one of the camp sites there had a bog where the cubicles were divided by sheet steel walls with steel doors that had sprung loaded hinges that slammed shut after you. A common prank was to leave a scrap or two of bacon in one of the crappers late in the evening. Generally a bear would smell the food, walk into the bogs, push open the door of the cubicle to get the bacon only to find that the door had slammed shut behind it. Many a sleepy camper was surprised by having a pair of large paws appear over the top of the cubicle wall while they were having their morning dump.
Post edited at 21:29
Mark Bannan - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

One thing I have heard is not to climb a tree (the reason sounds like a joke, but proves that truth is often more amusing than fiction), because a black bear will come up after you and a brown bear will pull the tree down!

M
oldie - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Serious reply (apparently). From Animal Confrontation section in The Pocket Doctor by Stephen Bezruchka, The Mountaineers.
"If the unspeakable has happened, and now results in the unthinkable, it is probably best not to struggle. People who have survived lion attacks state that the beast should be allowed to chew on an extremity in the hope that it will lose interest."
Presumably hoping it doesn't have a preference for offal.
pec on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Or you could buy a can of bear spray when you're in bear country
https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/bearspray.htm
Minneconjou Sioux - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to Eric9Points:

> In fact this follows the advice given for bear attacks. If it's a black bear, fight back, they're small enough that you can fend them off if you're lucky. If it's a grizzly just play dead and hope it doesn't regard you as food because there's no way you're going to scare one of those big phuqers off.

This is often the misconception. I can assure you that a 300lb Black Bear is not something you can fend off if it is determined to eat you.

So the real, and often surprising to many, reason is that Black Bear attacks, although much rarer than Grizzly Bear attacks, are more likely to be predatory in nature so fighting back is the best defence because they don't expect prey to fight back. Grizzly bear attacks are more likely to be defensive (territorial, looking after cubs etc) and as a result, playing dead (if you can't back off) means that you stop presenting a threat.

So actually, regardless of whether its a Black Bear or a Grizzly, you need to recognise whether it is a predatory attack or a defensive one and act accordingly.
tom_in_edinburgh - on 15 Sep 2017
In reply to dabble:

> Do you frequent Canal Street often?

I'd imagine that if you meet a bear on Canal Street 'lie on the ground and cover your head' is not great advice.
FactorXXX - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

I just make sure I'm wearing relatively lightweight shoes/boots when in bear country.
I might not be able to outrun the bear, but as long as I'm quicker than other people in my group who cares...
OwenM - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

The last time I was attacked by a bear, I grabbed it by the leg and throw it out the pram, simple.
Bobling - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:
Wish I could find Ice.Solo's account of fighting off a bear in the Japanese mountains but the internets seems to have eaten it. Weird we are all replying to a thread started by a spam bot!
Post edited at 10:29
profitofdoom on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Minneconjou Sioux:

> So actually, regardless of whether its a Black Bear or a Grizzly, you need to recognise whether it is a predatory attack or a defensive one and act accordingly.

All right but I'm not sure I can tell the difference so I'll just stick to Stanage and Cheddar
Minneconjou Sioux - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to profitofdoom:

> All right but I'm not sure I can tell the difference so I'll just stick to Stanage and Cheddar

I'd rather risk the bears
profitofdoom on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to Minneconjou Sioux:

> I'd rather risk the bears

That is what the cheese sandwiches are for
Footloose - on 16 Sep 2017
DancingOnRock - on 16 Sep 2017
In reply to FactorXXX:

> I just make sure I'm wearing relatively lightweight shoes/boots when in bear country.

> I might not be able to outrun the bear, but as long as I'm quicker than other people in my group who cares...

Or carry a small gun.


And shoot one of the other guys in the knee cap. You don't have to run at all then.
tom_in_edinburgh - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Minneconjou Sioux:
> So actually, regardless of whether its a Black Bear or a Grizzly, you need to recognise whether it is a predatory attack or a defensive one and act accordingly.

Alternatively, take the American approach and carry a .357 magnum loaded with bear ammunition:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucSJ3Hfuqjc
Post edited at 01:28
FactorXXX - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

Alternatively, follow the advice of the Alaska Granny and carry a .357 magnum loaded with special bear ammunition:

GILF Alert!
George Ormerod - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

> Alternatively, take the American approach and carry a .357 magnum loaded with bear ammunition:


Experience and research has shown that bear spray is about 90% effective at driving off a bear attack, fire arms about 50-60%. And at least one hunter has shot his unfortunate companion, who was being attacked by a bear - which is a doubly bad day. It seems in the heat of the moment most people can't hit the bear / shoot it enough times to stop it.

Still bear attacks are extremely rare and just talking in a calm voice and backing off almost always enough. At least it was for the wife last month when she was out walking the dog.

TMM on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

I avoid the worst Bear injuries by changing channels and allowing the beast to return to his 5 star hotel/cave.
Bobling - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Footloose:

Thanks - we miss you ice.solo!
tom_in_edinburgh - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to George Ormerod:

> Experience and research has shown that bear spray is about 90% effective at driving off a bear attack, fire arms about 50-60%.

Yeah, but that's because they didn't load up with the Alaska Granny's special anti-bear ammunition.



lucozade - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

When I was in the Rockies one of my friends was very fearful she was going to be attacked by a mountain lion. It's something I worry about continually when in remote lonely wilderness areas like Catbells... Do you have any advice on surviving a mountain lion attack?
Minneconjou Sioux - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to lucozade:

> When I was in the Rockies one of my friends was very fearful she was going to be attacked by a mountain lion. It's something I worry about continually when in remote lonely wilderness areas like Catbells... Do you have any advice on surviving a mountain lion attack?

While we all understand the humour, there are enough of you on here who have the urge to travel to N. America or remoter parts of Europe where it may be possible to encounter things that will eat you........and most on here are totally un-prepared for that event.

I have seen 15 bears this year. Most from the car but 5 on foot where knowing what to do has been worthwhile.
lucozade - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Minneconjou Sioux:

Having spent time in the US National Parks I agree with your sentiments!
Wsdconst - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to tom_in_edinburgh:

> I'd imagine that if you meet a bear on Canal Street 'lie on the ground and cover your head' is not great advice.

Depends what you're after ;)
jon_gill1 - on 17 Sep 2017
In reply to Minneconjou Sioux:
Funnily enough I've just come back from a part of Italy just a couple of hours away from the Dolomites where there are quite a lot of European bears that were reintroduced a few years back in the hope they'd breed and spread out across the Alps but instead they decided to breed and stay close to the towns and cities where food is far easier to get. I actually had a beer with a chap who was badly attacked last year by one close to his house! Most people wouldn't think of Italy as bear country but it was definitely worth knowing what to do if we stumbled upon one whilst out climbing!
Post edited at 22:23
rgold - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Bears might be a joking matter in the UK, but they are a real issue in the US. There are various myths involved (forget about bear bells and handguns), and ignorance of cooking and storing precautions is asking for trouble. Here is a talk by an expert: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PExlT-5VU-Y .
thommi - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to Footloose:

Thats a fantastic read.
Hyphin - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to lucozade:

> When I was in the Rockies one of my friends was very fearful she was going to be attacked by a mountain lion. It's something I worry about continually when in remote lonely wilderness areas like Catbells... Do you have any advice on surviving a mountain lion attack?

Yea, tell it that bear called it a pussy
Lion Bakes on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to Prada:

Best to be in Blackpool if you're going to have a bear attack.

L Wilderbeest - on 18 Sep 2017
In reply to Footloose:
Thank you for posting the link. Great read...
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 13:58 Tue
In reply to Prada:

How to tell what kind of bear is chasing you :

If you're running and running and you climb up a tree and the bear follows you, it's a black bear.

If you're running and running and you climb up a tree and the bear shakes you out of the tree, it's a brown bear.

If you're running and running and there are no trees, it's a polar bear.
tom_in_edinburgh - on 14:05 Tue
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

> How to tell what kind of bear is chasing you :

> If you're running and running and you climb up a tree and the bear follows you, it's a black bear.

If you're running and running but the bear is stuck to your shoe then it's a Poo bear.