/ Oh Theresa....

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Dr.S at work - on 04 Oct 2017
One of the most entertaining speeches I've seen in years!
Trevers - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

I think she's actually doing rather a good job of it. Seems more human than she has done for a while, and made a couple of off-the-cuff jokes.

I don't agree with a word of what she's saying but slightly more respect than before.
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Dr.S at work - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Trevers:

Yes - good endeavour, and some good gags at spreadsheet Phil' expense - I don't think he will be able to endorse his cough sweets!
Lusk - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

She got her P45
1
Ramblin dave - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

https://twitter.com/BBCPhilipSim/status/915545479236251648
"We've also dropped an E now, which actually starts to explain some of the things that have happened in the last hour"
Ramblin dave - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

Or as someone else put:

WT




F
Gordon Stainforth - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Ramblin dave:
Or as several have tweeted: 'God says F off to the Tories.'

Absolutely hilarious. Someone has actually disliked my post for simply quoting what many are aptly saying about what will surely go down as one of the most disastrous political speeches in history. As if I have godlike powers and can start making a stage fall apart hundreds of miles away! It was as if the speech was jinxed ... makes one believe in karma. It was scarcely believable, as the disaster unfolded before our eyes (and millions of viewers). First the P45 protestor (how on earth did he get past security? ... he was already a well-known prankster), then her prolonged, repeated coughing and choking fits with half an hour to go (as someone said 'she's now drunk so much water that she'll have to go to the loo in a minute'); then, scarcely believably as she limped on huskily, the lettering on the slogan behind her started falling apart - with wicked timing with her words (the f falling off just as she was saying 'an image of modern Britain in all its strength), so that by the end the whole centre had disappeared.
Post edited at 14:20
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Graeme Alderson on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Ramblin dave:


> "We've also dropped an E now, which actually starts to explain some of the things that have happened in the last hour"

From Twitter "She dropped an E after F-ing off."
Gordon Stainforth - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Graeme Alderson:

Another tweet:

Theresa May's fight to survive
Was broadcast from conference live;
She had a bad cough
The wall said F off
And May got a P45.
2
tom_in_edinburgh - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

Has anyone figured out how to blame the EU for everything falling apart yet?
3
Martin McKenna - UKC - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

Well that was hilarious!
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cb294 - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

From the Guardian comments:

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.

Tower blocks on fire off the shoulder of the White City flyover.

I watched Angela Merkel glitter in the dark near the Brandenburg Gate.

All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

Time to [cough] die.
1
Chris the Tall - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:
Edited lowlights

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/oct/04/the-cough-the-p45-the-falling-f-theresa-mays-speech...

The stuff about giving Corbyn a P45 was just cringemaking - is that the best she can do ?

5
Bulls Crack - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

yes - it didn't work as a joke since the P45 was intended for the post of PM!
Yanis Nayu - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

She reminds me of the Rebecca Front character in The Thick of It.
Yanis Nayu - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

This is now happening at Tory HQ:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYOlBsls-C0
Chris the Tall - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Bulls Crack:

Essentially saying "he shouldn't be leader of the opposition"

So a) he should be PM or b) she wants someone better in opposition or c) she thinks she has a right to tell the opposition who it's leader should be

But most of all it's just a weak attack, like Cameron saying he should do his tie up. Talk policies, not personalities.
4
Doug on 04 Oct 2017
Ann S on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

Did the "O" in country fall off? That really would have been a disaster.
Ian W - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Doug:

They aren't keen, are they?
Dr.S at work - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Ian W:

I was rather hoping she might complain about "a nasty frog in her throat" - would probably satisfied Tom in Edinburgh's request !
Gordon Stainforth - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Ann S:

> Did the "O" in country fall off? That really would have been a disaster.

Yes it did. This was how the slogan looked at the end of Theresa May's speech:

http://www.gordonstainforthbelper.co.uk/images/TorySloganatEndofMaysSpeech.png
3
Rob Exile Ward on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

On a personal level I can't help feeling sorry for her - will she sleep tonight? I doubt it. And very little is worse in life than being locked into a job you're no good at, you can't do and you didn't really want anyway.

On a political level she has made life a misery for literally millions, she has jeopardised the rule of law and is overseeing (possibly not the right word) the unfolding catastrophe that will be Brexit. So maybe there is a god after all.

2
Moley on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

Sort of reminds me of Neil Kinnock on the beach, fall over a pebble or have a stinking cold on the wrong day have no bearing on one's ability (or lack of) to lead a country.

But history can change on such insignificant happenings that you and I would think nothing of.
Dr.S at work - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Moley:

Indeed
john arran - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Ann S:

> Did the "O" in country fall off? That really would have been a disaster.

Ooh, a good game:

building a country that works for everyone

d o nt work for ever

b l ing c unt t wo for one

a co n t o r ever e
1
Lusk - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

Feel sorry for her? Give me a break!
She could just run away like her predecessor and live the life of a millionaire for the rest of her days.
6
Dr.S at work - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Lusk:
That she does not is surely to her credit?
3
john arran - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

Oh, it gets better.

It now appears that parts of her speech were written for The West Wing!

https://twitter.com/D_Raval/status/915618207343480833
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Gordon Stainforth - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> On a political level she has made life a misery for literally millions, she has jeopardised the rule of law and is overseeing (possibly not the right word) the unfolding catastrophe that will be Brexit. So maybe there is a god after all.

Actually, I tweeted more or less that earlier today:
'It seems Theresa May's speech was completely jinxed. Makes one almost believe in a God, or certainly some kind of god of truth.'

It's strange just how many people are shying away from the truth at the moment – when it comes to Brexit and many other things. They don't like being confronted by it. Someone asked above about the unfortunate demise of the Tory slogan during Theresa May's speech today – what letters fell off – so in answer I simply posted an image of it. And someone here gave it a dislike. In other words, they they don't like the truth, the reality of what happened (whether one sympathises with TM or not). They probably don't like freedom of speech either.

6
alastairmac - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

I heard somebody remarking today that she looked and sounded like the child catcher in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Gently nods in agreement.
2
sg - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to john arran:

> Oh, it gets better.

> It now appears that parts of her speech were written for The West Wing!


Awesome stuff. A further google shows that things were destined to be bad from the off - the tele trailed the plagiarism story before she even took to the lectern because that section was pre-released.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/10/04/has-theresa-may-lifted-speech-west-wing/

That Thick of It snippet is hilarious but her real problem seems to be precisely that she doesn't have a Malcolm Tucker sorting out the messes and keeping everyone in line.
bouldery bits - on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:
I almost feel sorry for her.

Then I think about education budgets and nurses pay. Then i realise that she gets zero sympathy from me. Ever
Post edited at 22:19
2
Ann S on 04 Oct 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

> Yes it did. This was how the slogan looked at the end of Theresa May's speech:


That looks like Klingon to me, or not.
Andy Hardy on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

Very noble sentiment Rob, to your credit.

Personally I think we should remember that she volunteered for the job, presumably thinking she could do it.

If you can't take a joke, don't join up.
summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Dr.S at work:

I'm not sure what's worse, May's lack of ability or the fact folk think Corbyn can do better. The Lib who's are still off the radar with a new leader who is so old he could die before the party, although that's 50/50 at the moment. UK politics has never been so weak.
1
Greasy Prusiks on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:
Labour seem to be infatuated with Corbyn but the fact is he can't unseat the weakest PM we've seen for years. Even the press talk about Theresa as am opportunity for Johnson not Corbyn.
Post edited at 08:18
captain paranoia - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Greasy Prusiks:

Well, an election is five years away (barring a VONC).

Internal coups are just around the corner. Prime ministerships are internal appointments within an elected Government, not decided by voters.
1
summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to captain paranoia:

> Internal coups are just around the corner. Prime ministerships are internal appointments within an elected Government, not decided by voters.

Unless you want a usa style presidential system. Then Yes, that's the way it is.
captain paranoia - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

I was explaining why Corbyn cannot unseat May...

Corbyn is Labour.
Boris is Tory.
The government is Tory.
PM is chosen within government ranks.
Corbyn, being Labour, is not within Tory Government ranks, therefore cannot unseat May.
Boris is within Tory government ranks, therefore can unseat May.

Clear enough for you now...?
1
summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to captain paranoia:

> I was explaining why Corbyn cannot unseat May.

He can. He can mount a leadership campaign that appeals to a greater majority of the population. He or the unions and momentum decided they'd go the hard left route, there are only so many people there, he made his choice.

There are plenty of good Labour MPs who could challenge the Tories, they could raise issues and probably defeat the Tories in a commons vote over many topics, as they would probably draw the Lib dems and some Tories onto their side. However none of these MPs are in the shadow cabinet, so Labour can't defeat or challenge the Tories over very much at all.

> Clear enough for you now...?

Was never unclear.
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captain paranoia - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

> He can. He can mount a leadership campaign that appeals to a greater majority of the population.

He can.

BUT NOT WITHIN THE TERM OF THIS PARLIAMENT.

Which bit of "Well, an election is five years away (barring a VONC)" did you not understand?
Ramblin dave - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to bouldery bits:

> I almost feel sorry for her.

> Then I think about education budgets and nurses pay. Then i realise that she gets zero sympathy from me. Ever

I started to feel sorry for her about basically catching a load of flack for having a cold. But then I remembered that the DWP would probably have declared her Fit For Work and yeah, karma's a bitch.
1
Rob Exile Ward on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Ramblin dave:

At the risk of being an amateur pychologist, I wouldn't be at all suprised if her cold wasn't psychosomatic; we've had a bit of experience of that in our famiy (other family members might disagree!) but the body is a funny thing when you're under stress. I expect to see less and less of her in the coming days and weeks.
summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to captain paranoia:

> He can.

> BUT NOT WITHIN THE TERM OF THIS PARLIAMENT.

> Which bit of "Well, an election is five years away (barring a VONC)" did you not understand?

If he was an opposition leader of any ability it wouldn't be hard to put pressure on sufficient to start people thinking of vonc , but he's so weak he still makes May look viable.
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Gordon Stainforth - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

I'm sure you're right. Several commentators who are experts about these things have said that she wasn't breathing properly, was too tense, and was shouting too much. One might even risk going further and suggesting that the inner tension might partly have been the result of her knowing deep down that a lot of what she was saying was complete nonsense, or untrue.
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summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:

> might partly have been the result of her knowing deep down that a lot of what she was saying was complete nonsense, or untrue.

If there was truth in that Blair would still be unable to talk now.
1
Gordon Stainforth - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

That doesn't follow for a moment. (In terms of logic, you are trying to convert an existential quantifier into a universal quantifier, which is not what I meant at all.)
1
jkarran - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

> There are plenty of good Labour MPs who could challenge the Tories, they could raise issues and probably defeat the Tories in a commons vote over many topics, as they would probably draw the Lib dems and some Tories onto their side. However none of these MPs are in the shadow cabinet, so Labour can't defeat or challenge the Tories over very much at all.

What vote could Labour possibly bring to the table to convince tory geese to vote for an early Christmas? All they could realistically hope to do is drive a billion pound wedge between May and the DUP while waiting for a couple of by elections to secure them the last few votes they'll need to bring her down and that presupposes they can bring every other party and independent with them in a headlong rush for a new and likely deeply unpopular election only Labour really stands to gain from. So yeah... Corbyn or any other Labour MP *could* bring May down... in some parallel fantasy world which doesn't exist.
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summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to jkarran:

Sorry I forgot. Don't knock the messiah.
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jkarran - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:
The messiah? Pull the other one.

I voted Corbyn for leader because our political choices had become bland and indistinct resulting in voter apathy among the moderate and a gradual rightward drift. He's addressed that issue effectively but on the important issue of our position in Europe he's proving to be a follower not a leader, too focused on Labour's perceived internal splits and not enough on the horrendous suffering brexit will bring to those he cares and advocates for. My thoughts on Corbyn are and long have been very mixed. I remain hopeful he's got enough time for a long game I'm not convinced he's actually playing to play out. The messiah he is not.
jk
Post edited at 14:51
Ramblin dave - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> The messiah? Pull the other one.

He's not the messiah, he's a very naughty absolute boy.
1
pasbury on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> I expect to see less and less of her in the coming days and weeks.

Better check out George Osborne's freezer then.
pasbury on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

> If he was an opposition leader of any ability it wouldn't be hard to put pressure on sufficient to start people thinking of vonc , but he's so weak he still makes May look viable.

Have you been away for a while (four months or so)?
Trevers - on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to jkarran:

> The messiah? Pull the other one.

> I voted Corbyn for leader because our political choices had become bland and indistinct resulting in voter apathy among the moderate and a gradual rightward drift. He's addressed that issue effectively but on the important issue of our position in Europe he's proving to be a follower not a leader, too focused on Labour's perceived internal splits and not enough on the horrendous suffering brexit will bring to those he cares and advocates for. My thoughts on Corbyn are and long have been very mixed. I remain hopeful he's got enough time for a long game I'm not convinced he's actually playing to play out. The messiah he is not.

You summed up my thoughts on Corbyn precisely, and that's also why I voted for him in the first leadership election.

summo on 05 Oct 2017
In reply to jkarran:
> . I remain hopeful he's got enough time for a long game I'm not convinced he's actually playing to play out. The messiah he is not.

Long game? How long are you prepared to give him. 40years on the benches and he hasn't made up his mind enough on the eu to go public yet?
Post edited at 20:06
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jkarran - on 06 Oct 2017
In reply to summo:

> Long game? How long are you prepared to give him. 40years on the benches and he hasn't made up his mind enough on the eu to go public yet?

Long enough for public opinion to swing enough on brexit that the electoral maths begins to look safe for one of the major parties (very unlikely Conservative but who knows, times change and they're looking desperate for a new platform) to offer robust opposition. Less than a year basically then we're f****d either way.
jk
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