/ Pedant’s Corner

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ianstevens - on 07 Oct 2017
At least three times in the past week I’ve seen the following mistake made, and it’s driving me up the wall.

Methodology is the study of methods.
Method refers to an applied technique.

For example: “many new methodologies exist...for the placing of bolts” should read “many new methods...”

Rant over.

Any others from any others?
2
Thugitty Jugitty on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

Pedants'
Greasy Prusiks on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Thugitty Jugitty:
Pedants'.

;)
Post edited at 12:49
2
Offwidth - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Thugitty Jugitty:

It's so common that pedantic posts include errors on UKC they ought to have a named law beyond Mr Sod.
john arran - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Offwidth:

> It's so common that pedantic posts include errors on UKC they ought to have a named law beyond Mr Sod.

Cole slaw?
Tyler - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Thugitty Jugitty:

> Pedants'

The OP might have a corner all to himself
Offwidth - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to john arran:

That will do nicely
Blue Straggler - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

Methodology is a SET of methods...
balmybaldwin - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:
Sorry to be pedantic, but the use you highlighted is entirely in keeping with the primary definition of "methodology";

Definition of methodology
plural methodologies
1 :a body of methods, rules, and postulates employed by a discipline :a particular procedure or set of procedures

2 :the analysis of the principles or procedures of inquiry in a particular field

(Merriam-Webster)
Post edited at 16:32
TobyA on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to john arran:

> Cole slaw?

Surely that should be kept for the hypothesis that criticism of religious belief can never be deemed to be racist. ;-)
deepsoup - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Offwidth:
> It's so common that pedantic posts include errors on UKC they ought to have a named law beyond Mr Sod.

Not necessarily an error. A corner for pedants could perfectly correctly be called the Pedant's Corner, just as a radio programme for women could be (and is) quite correctly called 'Woman's Hour'. It's a service offered to the pedant, not a pedant. Or you might be right. After endless debate in the original Pedant's/Pedants' Corner, Private Eye has given up; they call it 'Pedantry Corner' now.

BTW, there is already a named law for this beyond that of Mr Sod (aka Mr Murphy):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muphry%27s_law
Offwidth - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to deepsoup:
I'm aware of Mr Murphy but never thought he was at all specific for the pedant (a specifiity very much needed here). On the use of the apostrophe: the UKC pedant is never alone or abstact (too bloody common and very much 'in the face'). English is such a wonderful language partly as its living and growing and rules should always give way to apt communication and poetry; as a public web forum we should also be tolerant to those posting with less than ideal skills, sometimes maybe a little tired or drunk. Having said that a decent 'play on words' in response to errors is fine by me... its the boorish complaints I find so tedious and unfriendly.

Theree once was a pedant on U K C
Who on collective name choice got a bit arsey
Cole's was funny and fine
For an apt joke online
But the stickler insists on plain Murphy.
Post edited at 16:54
2
GerM - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Offwidth:

Not sure if you're just being intentionally ironic there or not, it's all getting a little hard to unravel. Your post is an example of Muphry's law in action.
Chris Harris - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Thugitty Jugitty:

> Pedants'

Yes, but how do you pronounce the first syllable?
deepsoup - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Offwidth:
> I'm aware of Mr Murphy but never thought he was at all specific for the pedant

Mr Murphy (aka Mr Sod) is not. Mr Muphry on the other hand...
Greenbanks - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

This thread has had me trying to find out whether there was a route anywhere called Pedant's Corner. Anyone know?
felt - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

Reminds me of the goat's cheese vs goats' cheese controversy in modern cookery writing.
Pekkie - on 07 Oct 2017
In reply to Offwidth:


> Theree once was a pedant on U K C

> Who on collective name choice got a bit arsey

> Cole's was funny and fine

> For an apt joke online

> But the stickler insists on plain Murphy.

Needs work on the scanning.


1
Offwidth - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to deepsoup:

My sincere apologies. An old dog can chase the wrong stick at times.
1
jess13 - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

On this and many forums the phrase 'studies have shown' is used to back up an argument usually with no back up references and with much derision from replies. However a more cunning 'another school of thought' has been used recently again with no references. When the derision starts i suppose it is easier to dissassociate yourself from 'a school of thought'.
ie.......just saying.

Lion Bakes on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

Is this like Poet's corner but played upon an out of tune piano?
Martin W on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to Pekkie:

> Needs work on the scanning.

Scansion

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/scansion
malk - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

> Reminds me of the goat's cheese vs goats' cheese controversy in modern cookery writing.

and wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Goat_cheese#Goats.27_cheese.3F
is goat cheese ok?
felt - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to malk:

Well, not really, because as someone says it's not made from goat.

Incidentally, I still don't know why my Marmot tent smells of pig fat (from new).
krikoman - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

> Well, not really, because as someone says it's not made from goat.

> Incidentally, I still don't know why my Marmot tent smells of pig fat (from new).

Marmots are really tiny pigs.
malk - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

what about goat milk? surely that's made from goat?
alx - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to malk:

Yes, fermented goats
malk - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

> Incidentally, I still don't know why my Marmot tent smells of pig fat (from new).

what model? the Catalyst 2P is vegan..

malk - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to alx:

ok, so google and wiki are wrong..
1
felt - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to malk:

It's the Nusku 3P. Maybe that means three little piggies, but aside from the smell, which seems to come from some slightly oily coating on the inside of the flysheet, I certainly find it congenial for one, despite the weight.
felt - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to krikoman:

> Marmots are really tiny pigs.

I'm not so sure. I've always had a soft spot for marmots, yet apart from Daddy Pig and to a certain extent Wilbur have I ever been that taken with pigs? Possibly not.
krikoman - on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

> I'm not so sure. I've always had a soft spot for marmots, ...

we'd rather not know about your soft spot if that's OK
veteye on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to felt:

> I've always had a soft spot for marmots

Do they spit-roast as nicely as Guinea-Pigs are purported to?

veteye on 08 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens

> Any others from any others?

I am not sure if you mean other types of word use?
If so, then I am tired of seeing and hearing functionality used instead of the much shorter/better word, function.
krikoman - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

I work with a bloke who "scribes" an email FFS!!

He also signs it off with BR, instead of Best Regards!
AndySL - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:

"Yourselves" or "yourself" when "you" would suffice. On a slightly different note, I get annoyed when people in pubs say "can I get a {insert drink of choice}?" when they mean "can you get me?"
eroica64 - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to krikoman:

Are little marmots marmites?
Spartacus on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to ianstevens:
Recent notice at well known climbing wall.

" No food or drink allowed into the pit area besides bottled water."

( It was At Milton Keynes)
johncook - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to malk:

Again?
johncook - on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to veteye:

They are better casseroled!
jcw on 09 Oct 2017
In reply to jess13:

Dissociate please
wercat on 10 Oct 2017
In reply to veteye:
"inspirational" instead of "inspiring" - it seemed to spring into existence for use in a coffee advertisement.

Why has the BBC banned the use of "as", "as if" and "as though" in favour of "like"?
Post edited at 10:13

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