/ Skoda: Three Injectors and a Fly-Wheel

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Xharlie on 12 Oct 2017
My Skoda Rapid (diesel) had to go in to the workshop to be fixed, about a week ago.

I bought it "new - but second-hand" in Summer 2016. It had only 18 kilometres but it had been registered to an owner by legal mandate and was thus priced a lot lower than new. Still in the sub-20k mileage range, it started struggling to start when cold and sounding a like a truck, banging and generally becoming a pain to drive so I took it in.

Initially, the Skoda workshop said they couldn't find the cause of the problem. They had to download the onboard data and send that to VW to have it analysed. After a week of waiting, they returned the car to us saying that they replaced a fly-wheel (to make the engine quieter) and THREE injectors which were clearly completely buggered. Specifics were not given. Everything was covered by guarantee so we paid nothing.

After that, the car drives smoother than "new-ish". Not only smoother, but the power before the turbo kicks in seems a lot more, making the turbo feel more complimentary to the driving experience and less obnoxious.

Average (not hyper-miling) fuel consumption has also dropped from the elevated level of around 5.5 litres per hundred back to the more acceptable one of 4.5 litres per hundred. Before the problems started, 4.5 was my mean in the local region and my best on a long drive was 3.9.

Anyway, this is the last month in which we have the choice to extend the guarantee or not. That's pricey! Before this problem developed, there would be no way in hell I'd choose that option but, now, I am wondering whether it isn't wise to take it. After all, these expensive parts failed in about 18 months of our use, two-years age on the car.

I Bing'd the parts on Google and , although no definite prices could be found, think an injector alone is about £ 300. Refurbished, less, but refurbished.

What to do?

I wonder if the parts were not dodgy from the start and, now that they have been replaced, will last many years? What if it's just bad design and they fail regularly?
thel33ter - on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

How pricey is pricey? Guarantees are kinda like gambling. If it extends it for another 5 years for £1000 it'd be tempting, if its £5000 for a year then less so. If it's the kinda warranty that covers absolutely everything, it's better value since it'll cover any electrical issues etc.

Saying that, if it's basically had the entire engine rebuilt early on, it seems unlikely the injectors will fail again. Its likely to have been caused by it being run once then sitting for a while.
dunc56 - on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:
You need to give figures - what's the car worth ? How much is the warranty - and for how long ?

And ... what does it cover ... and are there any T and Cs to be wary of - must be serviced by a VAG garage (can they legally do that on a warranty).

Do you know an independent garage who could do work for you ?

GarethSL on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

Interesting, my yeti is going in for a service at the end of the month, tho it is a few months overdue... Hopefully they won't find anything too drastic but I have noticed a slow/ steady decrease in efficiency and power, certainly isn't the same car when I bought it but still only has 38kkm on the clock.

Does your rapid have the ea189 motor? I think my service will also include the software update (I hope) that is a recent(?) service action, which from what I understand is supposed to improve the fuel injection pattern and help reduce NOx emissions, but there wasn't much info in the rather limited text message about it.
Irk the Purist - on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:
Surely your new parts will be guaranteed, regardless of whether you extend the warranty?
Post edited at 10:31
Ferret on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Irk the Purist:

Not sure about that actually

I think if you pay for something to be done the parts have a warranty on them of X period of time (usually a year or whatever)

If you get something done under warranty, the work done carries you to the end of the warranty you originally had - you don't get extended time if you see what I mean.... i.e. if you buy a TV with a 1 year guarantee and it breaks at 11 months, the replacement they give you has 1 months warranty on it, otherwise you are in effect better off by virtue of the first one breaking, in that you would end up with 23 months of cover on a purchase that had 12 months if they gave you a fresh 12 months cover on the replacement.
Martin W on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Ferret:

> If you get something done under warranty, the work done carries you to the end of the warranty you originally had - you don't get extended time

That was my reading of the Skoda warranty last time I checked. bit of a bummer, really. If you pay for work to be done then the new parts are warranted for three years.

I bought a three-year extended warranty for my Yeti when the manufacturer's three-year warranty expired. I never had to claim on it (unlike my insurance - damned lamppost jumped out behind me just as I started reversing...) I didn't extend the warranty further and I'm now considering changing the car - if I can find a low mileage Yeti with the Euro 6 engine. There's nothing on the market right now that meets my needs as well as or better than the Yeti.
Jimbo C - on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

Modern, efficient diesel engines for small cars are not 'badly designed' but they are designed to function on the limit of what can be achieved by burning light sticky oil. There is a lot of complicated machinery (and electronics) in there making lots of marginal gains in efficiency that add up to lots of bang per buck, but that means there is more that can go wrong and it can cost a lot to fix.

The bottom line is that if you do loads of miles, it could be worth extending the warranty.
Martin W on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

> I think my service will also include the software update (I hope) that is a recent(?) service action, which from what I understand is supposed to improve the fuel injection pattern and help reduce NOx emissions, but there wasn't much info in the rather limited text message about it.

I wouldn't be so keen on getting the emissions fix done. There are enough reports of it having caused non-trivial problems (often to do with the EGR valve AIUI) to make it a concern IMO. So much so that VAG have basically had to guarantee to fix for free any problems arising from "the fix" being applied. Which is fine as far as it goes, but you still have the hassle of taking the car in to have work done on it to correct a fault that their "fix" caused in the first place.

Hoping that "the fix" for the NOx issue will cure another random fault with the engine is somewhat optimistic IMO.

There is no legal or safety requirement to have "the fix" done. If you don't want it done then your dealer must accept your formal refusal to have it done (they can't do work on your car that you haven't authorised) and they should record it on the car's service log so you don't have to go through the same palaver in future.
Irk the Purist - on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Ferret:

They must come with some warranty.
GarethSL on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Martin W:

Interesting! Thank you for the heads up. As I think my car is now out of warranty I would want to be cautious about fixing something that isn't really broken, so to speak.
Ferret on 12 Oct 2017
In reply to Irk the Purist:

They are covered until the end of your original warranty - otherwise you are seen by the supplier as obtaining 'betterment' - i.e. you end up in a better place than before the failure (covered further into future).

And yes, you have had all the hassle of having had something go wrong and however long it takes to sort it out but in general, guarantees and warranties do not cover consequential loss which is what time, agro and lack of use fall into... you only get to challenge that if you suffer inconvenience over and above what could reasonably be expected.. i.e. if the repair in question could be done in a day but it took them a fortnight then you have some claim but if all is put right in a reasonable and timely manner all you are covered for is repair to the issue and that repair lasts until the end of the original warranty.

In all likelihood, you will be better off (bar the agro) as the new parts will probably last as long as the first set (or longer) but if they fail just outside original warranty the strict letter says you are not covered then.
Xharlie on 13 Oct 2017
In reply to thel33ter:

We paid a bit under 16000 euro for the car. The new-value of a comparable engine capacity and feature-set was about 23000 euro at the time.

A three-year extension would be about 1300 euro for three years and there's no option to extend further than that.

I am not too sure of the details because the entire thing is in German but, from what I can understand and what has been translated by friends, I gather that it doesn't cover everything, only stuff that fails when it shouldn't like these injectors that they replaced. Wear and tear and anything classed as consumable (filters, etc.) are not covered.
Si_G - on 13 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

My old A3 lunched the dual mass flywheel at about 4yo. Audi wanted £2500 but in the end got it done for £800ish “mates rates”.
Chris Craggs - on 13 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

You presumably still have 12 months warranty that came with the car, at the end of that you could buy an stand-alone.

Chris
Martin W on 13 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:
> A three-year extension would be about 1300 euro for three years and there's no option to extend further than that.

Was that the "official" Skoda extended warranty? You might well be able to get cover from a third party extended warranty provider. It's basically just insurance.

> I am not too sure of the details because the entire thing is in German but, from what I can understand and what has been translated by friends, I gather that it doesn't cover everything, only stuff that fails when it shouldn't like these injectors that they replaced. Wear and tear and anything classed as consumable (filters, etc.) are not covered.

I don't think you'll ever find a warranty that covers wear and tear or consumables. Even the manufacturer’s original warranty won't cover those kind of things - you need a service contract for that, not a warranty (and even then it probably won't cover wear & tear).
Post edited at 22:18
Siward on 14 Oct 2017
In reply to Martin W:

I used to have the best AA warranty that they did, Gold or whatever. It was pretty good but injectors (£700 odd each) were NOT covered, as I found to my cost. Garage's view was that aftermarket warranties are rarely worth the paper they're written on.
Martin W on 14 Oct 2017
In reply to Siward:

A pal of mine told me that he always bought extended warranties for his cars, and he reckoned that he had ended up quids in over the years. I bought the (third party) extended warranty for my Yeti after a costly repair on my Subaru when it was ten years old. (It probably cost more than the car was worth, but a replacement car would have cost even more and there was nothing else wrong with the Scooby.) I never had any cause to claim on the extended warranty on the Yeti, and I let it lapse at the end of the three years (though they did offer to extend it.)
jkarran - on 14 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

> We paid a bit under 16000 euro for the car. The new-value of a comparable engine capacity and feature-set was about 23000 euro at the time.

> A three-year extension would be about 1300 euro for three years and there's no option to extend further than that.

> I am not too sure of the details because the entire thing is in German but, from what I can understand and what has been translated by friends, I gather that it doesn't cover everything, only stuff that fails when it shouldn't like these injectors that they replaced. Wear and tear and anything classed as consumable (filters, etc.) are not covered.

I'd be very tempted to get rid or buy the warranty, run it 2 years and get rid privately or trade in at the end of the warranty. Relatively basic stuff like that shouldn't be going g wrong on a nearly new car. Get a simpler turbo petrol or electric.
Jk
Wee Davie - on 14 Oct 2017
In reply to Xharlie:

Good result getting those components changed under warranty. I had a Mk V gold that needed a new dual mass flywheel. That plus the clutch (which was advised to be changed at same time) cost £1300!

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