/ Hard yes ... but is it even climbing?

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stp - on 09 Nov 2017
Hardonicus - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

It's training.
mrphilipoldham - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Gymnastics.
Bulls Crack - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Extreme stair climbing
Jon Stewart - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

It's swinging, running and jumping. I didn't see any climbing there at all.
plyometrics - on 09 Nov 2017
Big Lee - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to Hardonicus:

It's hardly training but it does look a laugh. The odd comedy route down the bouldering wall is ok with me.
bouldery bits - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

If that's what you like. I put this in the same category as golf and religion - not for me.
HansStuttgart - on 09 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

I saw a Johnny Dawes video once where he did stuff like this on rock....
john arran - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

If he is trying to climb then he isn't very good at it because he isn't maintaining three points of contact at all times. If he's not careful he might fall off.
wbo - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp: it starts at some holds, finishes at different holds, doesn't touch the ground and has a grade. It's climbing

deacondeacon - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:
I'd give my right arm to find a route that has those moves just above the lip of a massive overhang with bomber gear.

HeMa on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Hardonicus:

Ding ding, these kinds of routes are actually rather common in Comps.

True, not that often on ’real rock’. But still.

BTW. Everyone should try these, great for coordination and such.
Si dH - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Big Lee:
> It's hardly training but it does look a laugh. The odd comedy route down the bouldering wall is ok with me.

Actually I think this is good training for outdoor bouldering.
Often outside, hand/eye/foot dynamic coordination and timing is hugely important on a lot of hard moves, and this seems a good way of isolating those skills, analogous to isolating finger strength training by fingerboarding.

Ironically, I am so bad at this stuff that I'm too embarrassed to work my weaknesses, so I hate and never do such problems, hoping instead that if I do more Fingerboard training I'll be able to overcompensate outside.

Despite considering myself a bit more knarly than the average wall climber, I'm also frankly scared to try these problems because I'm convinced I'm going to face-plant either the wall, the floor, or both.
Post edited at 07:23
stp - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to john arran:

> If he is trying to climb then he isn't very good at it because he isn't maintaining three points of contact at all times. If he's not careful he might fall off.

Indeed. I also think he'd find it pretty hard trying to place fiddly wires midway across that traverse while climbing like that.

paul__in_sheffield - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:


Looks like most of the World Cup problems these days ;-)
If you blur your eyes it could be ‘86, Johnny, Plantation, so yes it’s climbing
Rich2002 on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

I climb at White spider and have had a great time trying these routes. There is a similar climb/run/whatever you want to call it, at all the grades. Lots of fun, very social and a bit different. Time to put some effort in on the hard one tonight.

Not for everone but once in a while it is good to switch things up and get people trying some more dynamic stuff.
C Witter on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Looks fantastic. And of course it's climbing. What's all this crap about "using your feet" if you do and suddenly everyone's like "well, I didn't mean like that..."?!
Climbing Pieman on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:
Used to be a setter at my local wall that set routes occasionally for top ropes where you had to run or delicately step up a diagonal line of hold to get to the first hand hold of the route. The first hand hold itself sometimes also needed a dynamic move to reach it!

Were popular overall as they were for most climbers very hard to get the movement, speed and balance just right to stay on. I never managed any of them!
DannyC - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Looks great fun - although I'd be terrible at it.

Can anyone think of any outdoor routes that necessitate this sort of thing?

The only thing I can think of is the Mantel Masterclass (f6C) problem at Back Bowden which (for me) involved a 20 yard run up and jump; a method which is probably cheating, but definitely more fun.

D.
Lord_ash2000 - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

I suppose in the broadest sense it is 'climbing' but I don't like the fashion for setting stuff like this at walls and I see no need to 'train' for this sort of movement. To me it's closer to parkour type stuff with wall runs and jumps etc, if it is climbing it certainty isn't the climbing I want to do, luckily it's never required outdoors.

Not to mention the annoyance of big volumes sticking out everywhere below other problems which it causes.
Lusk - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Is that Savvas finally getting some climbing in?
cheese@4p - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Lord_ash2000:

Indoor bouldering passed the point of replicating outdoor climbing years ago. Some of us use it as training for outdoors, many others have no desire ever to climb outside. Each to their own. The sooner we oldies get used to that idea the better.
Offwidth - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to cheese@4p:

Are you sure you're old, as that p should be a d !?

I enjoy these dynamic balance problems but they cause 'sector hogging' and the injury risk is higher. As someone else pointed out its also really annoying to have big volumes at the base of a slab if you might hit them from another more delicate problem. I'd say they are a luxury all but the biggest walls could usually best do without.
mouseliveson - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Hardonicus:

for the high jump?
Martin W on 10 Nov 2017
Alien Rock used to have a route on the slab wall that started a bit like that. Not using big volumes, though, just large holds. Me and my pals failed to get off the ground on it for about 15 minutes, then the guy who set it showed us how it should be done, after which we continued to fail for another 15 minutes before giving up and going to do something sensible. Basically, while a bit of a laugh, it was a waste of half an hour. I don't think I ever saw anyone else get off the ground on that route without cheating.
john arran - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Martin W:

You've just twigged a memory. Sobell Centre corridor wall in London, early 1985 I think but it also might have been 1989. I succeeded on a project problem of mine which was a horizontal dyno, maybe 12-15ft across between start and finish holds, involving sprinting across two intermediate footholds before leaping for the finishing hold. I think it may have just been too late to be included in Ray Hancock's 'classic' guidebook to problems there. Just shows that such antics aren't particularly new!

cheese@4p - on 10 Nov 2017
In reply to Martin W:

The Climbing Gym (as my excellent local establishment terms it's self) market is getting so competitive that the setters will try to appeal to the paying public whatever it's motivations. These establishments exist to make £ not to push outdoor climbing standards. So if they put up something novel and everyone ignores it they can easily replace it with something more popular. Capitalist democracy at work innit.
In general they do need to offer variety to keep as many people coming back as possible.
philhilo - on 11 Nov 2017
In reply to stp:

Its climbing, see Johnny Dawes, he's put up a good few decent climbs in his time. If we all got better at this kind of dynamic move we would all be better climbers. It might not be found on a classic VS but it might open up all kinds of new routes.
BrendanO - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to philhilo:

I can almost never do running probs...but I very much defend their right to be there:
-there don't seem to be hunners of em
-they're often exciting to try, or to watch
-the commitment required is kind of impressive.
-why not? It's all climbing; and you don't have to do that problem.

For me, the main transfer to real rock (HVS or f6b outside on a good day) is commitment - if I did more running probs, I think I might be better at bravery/commitment outdoors where it's useful, and be better at controlling fear at times where it's debilitating.

But maybe I'm wrong.

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