/ Best spinner leashes

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fairweatherclimber - on 12 Nov 2017

The BD leashes look grand, but £50??!

https://www.climbers-shop.com/3125759/products/black-diamond-spinner-leash.aspx

Anyone used the Blue Ice leashes, or DMM? I'm looking for a simple way of getting away from old school leashes for classic grade 3/ 4 routes.

petegunn on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I paid £30 for mine £50 is a bit much.
Most places have them for £40 online so you could go to a shop i.e gooutdoors and they will price match and take another 10% off if you can find them cheaper.
So you can probably get a black diamond one for £36 ish if you search about
fairweatherclimber - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to petegunn:


Ok cheers.

I actually quite like the simplicity of the Blue Ice leashes - no karabiners, some reports of them unclipping from some leashes?
Andrew Lodge - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I use the Blue Ice ones, never had a problem with them.
HeMa on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I got the Blue ice ones to replace my DIY version. Simple, effective, slick and can be used with just one tool.

I’ve also used the BD spinners, and they weren’t bad but the biners were a tad fiddly.
wbo - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber: I have Grivel but replaced the little biners as they unclip more often than you'd think. Blue Ice look good to me

fairweatherclimber - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to wbo:

Thanks all - very useful..
Tricadam on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

Handy to lark's foot the leash to a snapgate so you can unclip it from your belay loop if required - e.g. to something higher up your body if you need to invert the tool for a move. Too much stretch otherwise.
Pina - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to Andrew Lodge:

Just watch how you store them. I admittedly stupidly stored them by hanging them from a hook in my gear cupboard and it stretched them out (either that or a fall I took on them). They're pretty annoying to use if they don't spring back (total trip hazard).
fairweatherclimber - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to Pina:

Duly noted..

Bad luck
olddirtydoggy - on 12 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

BD ones are just wonderful. I found mine on the Cairngorms. Naturally tried to find the owner before calling swag.
GarethSL on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:
If you're not too fussed about having a rated pair (e.g. just in case of a drop) then you could always make a set from an old sling, some shock cord and a few bits of sailboat ironmongery. Attach them to your axes with some cord that will break under load.

I found BD leashes to be very nice, but still a lot of faff. The Grivel leashes that seem to go from harness to axe one then to axe two look hideous, but maybe they work well in principal? Wouldn't want to take a fall on axe two tho...
Post edited at 07:10
jonnie3430 - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I like the blue Ice ones, larks foot then onto your axes, snapgate to rope loop and hey presto! When you get to a belay, get them out the way and move the snap gate to the belay.
nufkin - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

> you could always make a set from an old sling, some shock cord and a few bits of sailboat ironmonger

It takes a bit of trial and error to get the length of the (tubular) sling and shock cord right, but otherwise this is a pretty cheap option. I used de-cored 6mm or 7mm rope, which got very fuzzy pretty quickly. Not sure if tubular sling would be better for this, but it means the whole thing got iced up pretty quickly.

I've since been using the BD spinner and it's been great at keeping tangles to a minimum. Petzl do a similar one now as well, I think
jonnie3430 - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to nufkin:
> I've since been using the BD spinner and it's been great at keeping tangles to a minimum. Petzl do a similar one now as well, I think

Do you have to use a carabiner to attach the leashes to your axes? I had to do the same with some old grivel ones and found the flappy crab annoying, why I much prefer the larks foot of the blue Ice.
Post edited at 12:46
Rob Morgan on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:

I read somewhere to tie a little bit of cord at the bottom of the tool and attach the carabiners to that. Seems to have helped as the carabiners are less inclined to unclip from the cord.
TobyA on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Morgan:

They also make much less noise but loops do add extra hassle and you think you'll cut through them eventually from using your tool in walking axe mode.
Cumbrian Climber - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Morgan:

Much better to attach the loops halfway up the shaft of the axe then the krabs don't get in the way of anything much. To do this you need to clip the harness end of the spinner leash into a purpose made bandolier which is also clipped into your harness (so you don't strangle yourself if you fall off) but this has another advantage in that it keeps the elasticated tethers pretty clear of all your gear and well clear of your crampons.
Dave Perry - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I always wonder how many injuries are caused by falls when these leashes start flailing around in a fall or slip?
Rob Morgan on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to TobyA:

Yeah I can see how that would be annoying. Mine are tied at just the right length to push around the bottom hand rest, so it then cradles the loop of cord. They tend to stay there and are mostly out of the way when walking.
Tricadam on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to Dave Perry:

> I always wonder how many injuries are caused by falls when these leashes start flailing around in a fall or slip?

Falling while leashed is always hazardous, whether in the winter climbing or BDSM context. Handle with care.
nufkin - on 13 Nov 2017
In reply to jonnie3430:

> Do you have to use a carabiner to attach the leashes to your axes?

Using with nomics, so they clip into a loop of cord through the wee hole under the rest. I have used Blue Ice ones as well, and I like the larks foot method for simplicity (and not coming undone - though the BD clips seem pretty good on the whole)
nniff - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I have a spare BD Spinner Leash for sale - new and unused - £30 including postage.
coldwill - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to GarethSL: "The Grivel leashes that seem to go from harness to axe one then to axe two look hideous, but maybe they work well in principal? Wouldn't want to take a fall on axe two tho..."

I think your doing it wrong, tie in at the middle not the end. One axe on each end....
French Erick - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

I've had the grivel one (lost it on a walk in to beinn eighe not even realising until I fished for it to start climbing). Now have been climbing with the BD one for maybe 3/4 seasons. It's never bothered me as in unclipping... I like the biners, so I can take unclip one/both axes as and when I need. I probably wouldn't like the lark foot solution but I have never tried it. Horses for courses and all that?!
cb294 - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:
No, he is doing it right, or let´s say according to instructions if using the Double Spring 2.0 leash (the regular Double Spring model is a bog standard leash with a sling in the centre for lark´s footing to the harness and two carabiners on the arms for the axes.

The 2.0 Model starts with the sling, has a carabiner in the centre and another at the other end. The instructions state:

An elastic double sling system to avoid losing tools when climbing on rock or ice, solving the problem of modern climbing without a leash.
The Double Spring is attached to the harness by looping it through the tape ring over the harness itself.
The two ice axes are attached with 2 small carabiners to the holes on the spike (max 750kg).
Permits easy changeovers of hands and tools.
The two sections are so elastic that they don’t impede any movement and allow maximum arm extension when required.
Compact when required, long when required.

edit: If you don´t believe me, click on the link, select ice axes, and scroll down...

http://www.grivel.com/products/ice/accessories/


Post edited at 18:32
GarethSL on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:

> I think your doing it wrong, tie in at the middle not the end. One axe on each end....

Then perhaps you can explain this concoction....

http://www.libertymountain.com/SupplyImages/WF00041/758078_340x340.jpg
cragtyke on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to fairweatherclimber:

Simond do single leashes with krabs sewn in, available at their usual outlets, not a bad price either.
coldwill - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

Err no, that is wank. I stand corrected. Like you I can't see how this could be beneficial.
GarethSL on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:

Right?! We had a play with one in a shop, it's quite a bizarre looking system. Even more so as they they already do a 'normal' leash, so I wonder if it's an answer to a problem that didn't exist or some patenting issue...

The principal seems to work in my mind, but in practice I imagine the way in which you would cross them over would play hell, especially if you're on second.
HeMa on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:

To gareth as well...

girdhitch the loop to the "primary" tool. Attache the center biner (with spinner) to belayloop and the other end either to the other tool, or if only one tool is needed/used to the harness (or the primary tool)...
GarethSL on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to HeMa:
Yes, but Grivel specify that the biners are for axes and the tape loop is for larks footing to the harness.

http://www.grivel.com/products/ice/accessories/63-double_spring_20

To repeat what cb294 already said.

- The Double Spring is attached to the harness by looping it through the tape ring over the harness itself.
- The two ice axes are attached with 2 small carabiners to the holes on the spike (max 750kg).


Edit: This system has also been covered in much detail and indeed according to correspondence to grivel the biner is for the belay loop https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=572682

bizarre that an axe would be larks footed, why not just have another biner?!
Post edited at 09:38
coldwill - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to GarethSL: From the other thread:

CurlyStevo - on 07 Jan 2014
In reply to Kai:

I asked grivel about this and they got back to me. It appears the website is wrong and the Grivel 2.0 spring leash connects to the harness by the swivel biner and the axes are connected with one of them being larks footed and the other using the supplied biner.
jonnie3430 - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:

Sounds like it'd be better with a separate leash for each axe, then you could larks foot both.
GarethSL on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to coldwill:

Yes, that's the correspondence I was referring to. Though I think its quite poor form from Grivel to have still not updated their website, especially as that thread is from 2013! The instructions for the 2.0 leash are not clear at all and as Toby A notes in that thread they are still identical to those for their regular leash.

I now consider myself corrected :^)
nufkin - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to GarethSL:

> The instructions for the 2.0 leash are not clear at all

I seem to remember, some years ago when wrist leashes were standard, reading the suggestion (from Neil Gresham, I think) that those braving the world of leashless climbing could consider just tying a length of cord between the two axes, on the basis that you probably wouldn't drop both at once
coldwill - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to jonnie3430: I can't see the point of it, I've never used a spinner but always wonder how much of a difference they make. I just use the old style that larks foots in the middle and uses little krabs at each end when I use one at all.

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