/ Cars damaged at Seathwaite

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Rog Wilko on 14 Nov 2017
Watch where you park at Seathwaite (the Borrowdale one). It seems some of Sunday's attenders of the F&R war memorial meet on Great Gable got a shock when they returned to their cars.
http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/Shocked-witnesses-watch-on-as-cars-damaged-by-tractor-driving-through-...
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:
I know this won't be a popular post, and the tractor driver shouldn't have damaged the cars but...

They shouldn't have bloody parked where they did the inconsiderate coins. People shouldn't have to stop working because you decide to abandon your car somewhere. I don't know this road but what if an emergency vehicle for example had to try and get through that, no chance with a fire engine. Some people think you can just dump their car someone without any consideration for the people they impact.

(Edit to fix some spelling mistakes)
Post edited at 12:40
gethin_allen on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

To be fair to the tractor driver, they have to put up with people parking like dickheads all the time and this was probably the last straw.
Unfortunately they'll still face a massive bollocking for it but the car drivers may at least have a little more consideration next time they abandon their cars effectively blocking the road. I doubt even a caravan or box van could fit through the gap they left.
CasWebb - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Looking at the pictures and the news report last night they had parked very badly on a narrow road. This has been a growing problem at that location and the farmers have been justifiably upset by the problems it causes them doing their jobs, would appear that he has finally lost his cool big time.
captain paranoia - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:

> They shouldn't have bloody parked where they did the inconsiderate coins.

Yup; the picture does show what I'd say is inconsiderate parking.
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

They may have parked badly but that doesn't give any other member of the public the right to take the law into thier own hands. The farmer didn't have any right to cause criminal damage, he should have called the police or highways agency.
Dave Cumberland - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

There is a huge responsibility to park with care otherwise our time-honoured privilege to park at Seathwaite will be taken away. Stupid parking will bring a stupid response, but morally the tractor-driver has the higher ground however wrong his response.

More respect should be shown at Seathwaite - too much dickheaded parking, bags of dogsh!t, litter, even human sh!t.
DC
wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

you have to look in lost and found!

https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=674219

there is also a thread on pistonheads I came across that must have said all there is to say on the subject, fascinating displays of ignorance from some posters there!

Nevis-the-cat - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

He's in a bit of a bind.

He can't go back, and forward is not going to be pretty.

He's blocking the road, it's a Sunday, Highways Agency will be miles away on the M6 (and probably can't do much), and the plod probably at least an hour, maybe two. Even if they get to him and call out a trailer, there's not much they can do - can't get past him for a start.

yesbutnobutyesbut - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Nevis-the-cat:

I have plenty of sympathy for his predicament and am not condoning the parking for a second but none of us have any right to damage other peoples property because we are being inconvinienced. He should have called authorities for some guidance at least.
wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:
that's easily said but I was parked there from 0730 and they were busy already with moving sheep, still had time to greet walkers in a friendly way when I passed through the yard at 0800 - it's that time of year when they get them down from the fells and there isn't enough pasture in the valley for all of the sheep through the winter


It's hard to say it is deliberate as he could have progressively found the sqeeze getting worse to the point where the most damage was done - I had to take care getting through in a small car a bit after 12. What would you do? Animals in the back, unable to reverse without damaging an untold number of vehicles, road in and out now blocked for hundreds of vehicles if you stop?

Least of 3 Weevils
Post edited at 13:00
Chris the Tall - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:

> I know this won't be a popular post,

Quite the contrary it seems...
wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

btw the parking was far far worse and covered more distance than I've ever seen there before in decades
Steve Perry - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Some signs on the verge could help "Park Like a Dickhead at Your Own Risk"
cander - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Nevis-the-cat:

Plod can get there from Cockermouth in about 20-30 minutes if its an IR, quicker in the unlikely event there's a patrol in the area, however in this case they would despatch a feckless PCSO who would wander round wringing their hands and to be fair if the people who have parked their cars are out for the day you'd need to tow all the offending cars and that would take hours. Farmer can go back - reversing trailers is bread and butter stuff - he (and all of you) are not allowed to damage other peoples property because you're irritated. No one comes out of this with credit.
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

If it wasn't deliberate the farmer should have left his details on the cars. He's smashed up a load of vehicles and driven off. Whatever the circumstances this is illegal and the farmer shouldn't have taken the law into his own hands.
wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to cander:

were you there yesterday? - because I don't believe reversing a trailer would have worked very well at all, given what I saw. Perhaps on other occasions
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> Quite the contrary it seems...

So it appears, I was certainly expecting more outrage. What has happened to UKC today?!


wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

it has been reported that he left details at the pub in Seatoller - the road was obstructed by parking far, far north of the bridge where the parking used to reach - in fact it wasn't far from the tail of the parking to the little campsite, astonishing to relate, so hard to say where he could have safely stopped
Steve Perry - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:

> So it appears, I was certainly expecting more outrage. What has happened to UKC today?!

I can't help siding with the farmer, especially when they also have to put up with 3 peakers all summer.
Simon Caldwell - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to gethin_allen:

> the car drivers may at least have a little more consideration next time they abandon their cars effectively blocking the road

Only 50% of the drivers involved did this - the ones who parked on the opposite side of the road to cars already parked quite properly. If people only parked down one side of the road then there'd be plenty of room for farm vehicles to get through.
Rob Parsons on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Steve Perry:

> I can't help siding with the farmer

Doing damage like that, and then departing the scene without even leaving a note, as seems to be the claim?

I'm not siding with him/her.
marsbar - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

Highways agency don't cover minor roads, so it would be the police who would probably be quite busy especially on remembrance day and having suffered badly from austerity measures, or the county council similarly cutback and good luck getting a real person on a Sunday.

I agree in principle people shouldn't take the law into their own hands but I can see why they do.

Visitors to rural areas shouldn't park inconsideratly and should be mindful that their playground is someone else's workplace.
Clint86 - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Nevis-the-cat:

Perhaps he could of got together 6 or 7 members of the public and lifted/bounced the car off the road more.
MG - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

Are you sure? I thought you had the right to clear obstructions from highways.
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Clint86:

> Perhaps he could of got together 6 or 7 members of the public and lifted/bounced the car off the road more.

Could take hours looking at the image. He might have to suffer a suspended sentence for criminal damage, but hopefully word will get out and it shouldn't be a future problem.

Long term it might be better to gravel a small field nearer rosthwaite, plant trees around it and make that the only long term parking for the bottom of borrowdale, apart from a few designated slots at seathwaite etc.. for cafes.
Stuart en Écosse - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

My primary concern is that the farmer, and everyone he knows locally, which likely means everyone, will have a much dimmer view of visitors to the area. Whoever said stupid actions result in stupid responses is spot on.
Mick r - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

is no one mentioning the fact that a load of parking spaces have been removed nearer the farm by someone placing a load of boulders on the verge making it impossible to park. I'm not sure when they appeared, but it was around the same time as the farmer opened up the field and started charging £3 a day.

I assumed it was the farmer who placed the boulders there in an attempt to get more people to pay for the parking? As it sounds like the parking was almost up to the other campsite then all it has done is make people park further back up the road where its narrower .

I'm not defending the parking, but you don't have to be a genius to work out what would happen on busy days
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

> My primary concern is that the farmer, and everyone he knows locally, which likely means everyone, will have a much dimmer view of visitors to the area. Whoever said stupid actions result in stupid responses is spot on.

It is not a new problem, he has previously used pallet forks on his tractor to lift cars out the way that were blocking access. And his certainly isn't the only farm or lane in the lakes to suffer this problem.
Lusk - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I wonder if any of them were hire vehicles?
Skip - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:

> I know this won't be a popular post, and the tractor driver shouldn't have damaged the cars but...

There is no but, the tractor driver had no right to damage the cars.

Sir Chasm - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Skip:

> There is no but, the tractor driver had no right to damage the cars.

Of course not, but this is clearly accidental damage, he thought he had enough room to get through (and very nearly did) and found out he was wrong.
yesbutnobutyesbut - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

> Of course not, but this is clearly accidental damage, he thought he had enough room to get through (and very nearly did) and found out he was wrong.

Rubbish. He'd have stopped after the first car if it was accidental as he wouldn't have wanted to cause anymore damage. We all go through narrow gaps in vehicles at some point without hitting things and a farmer who drives his tractor through narrow gate openings most days is going to have a pretty good idea of the width of it.

Regardless of the rights and wrongs of the situation to call it 'clearly accidental' is ludicrous.
Sir Chasm - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

Nope, clearly accidental, he merely misjudged it and thought it would be easier to carry on than reverse.
Trangia on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rob Parsons:

> Doing damage like that, and then departing the scene without even leaving a note, as seems to be the claim?

> I'm not siding with him/her.

But a post before yours had already told you that he had left a note at the pub about it....
bedspring on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Skip:

> There is no but, the tractor driver had no right to damage the cars.

No, but did have a legal right to drive down that road. What would you have done?

What I would have done is have phoned the Police, who would be unlikley to come. Then I would get another tractor and trailer and drive from the Seatoller end, and refuse to move until the way was clear.
Pedro50 on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> Only 50% of the drivers involved did this - the ones who parked on the opposite side of the road to cars already parked quite properly. If people only parked down one side of the road then there'd be plenty of room for farm vehicles to get through.

I just can't agree. Even if you are first there you should not be parking half on the road.
Glyno - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to bedspring:

> ...I would get another tractor and trailer and drive from the Seatoller end, and refuse to move until the way was clear.


I'm not entirely sure you've thought that through ;)

Trangia on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Actually calling the police wouldn't have solved the tractor driver's dilemma. The police wouldn't have been able to access the cars without keys, and with the drivers on top of Great Gable, they couldn't have resolved the problem.

When I was working I once found the access to our office car park blocked by a huge Lithuanian lorry so no one could get out to get out to appointments. I rang the police who attended but admitted that until the driver returned there was nothing they could do. It transpired that the lorry driver, who hardly spoke any English had gone off to a cafe for breakfast.

One of life's annoyances that you can do b*gger all about..

I can sympathise with the farmer, but he was wrong to cause the damage. Just bloody stupid parking by the public, so difficult to feel sympathetic to them.
wintertree - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Looks like the farmer just discovered the old Wintertree family motto.

“Two wrongs don’t make a right. It normally takes a lot more.” In this case, several cars worth...
Post edited at 15:54
MG - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:

> Nope, clearly accidental, he merely misjudged it and thought it would be easier to carry on than reverse.

Definitely. I mean, no one would deliberately cause that sort of damage - they'd get in to all sorts of bother. Clearly accidental.
bedspring on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Glyno:

> I'm not entirely sure you've thought that through ;)

All the drivers would be stuck.
They would then phone the Police.
Then when the Police came I would ask why they had not come before.
Press would be invited.
No parking all the way down within a couple of months as in Langdale.
I would open my proper surfaced car park for captive custom.
KERRCHING
ian caton on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Guess the farmer hasn't lived there very long. If he had he would have an inkling that the road would be impassable to large vehicles on a nice Sunday and would plan to move sheep on a weekday.

I guess whole thing deliberate.

p.s. I come from a hill sheep farming family.

Rob Parsons on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Trangia:

> But a post before yours had already told you that he had left a note at the pub about it....

Didn't notice that; my fault for not reading the thread carefully enough.
Rick Graham on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:
> Guess the farmer hasn't lived there very long. If he had he would have an inkling that the road would be impassable to large vehicles on a nice Sunday ....

Part B of the Building Regulations section 11 suggests a minimum width of gates as 3.1m and 3.7 m between road kerbs to allow access for emergency vehicles.

IMHO anybody not leaving room for a fire engine/ambulance should be towed away.

All it needs is two lines 3.7 m apart painted down the road plus passing places, then there is no debate who parked first and who caused the obstruction.
On the other hand, outside the lines, everybody can use their legal right to park on this road within 15 metres of a public highway, as long as they do not restrict access to emergency vehicles and farmers fields.
Post edited at 16:49
Trangia on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rick Graham:

> Part B of the Building Regulations section 11 suggests a minimum width of gates as 3.1m and 3.7 m between road kerbs to allow access for emergency vehicles.

> IMHO anybody not leaving room for a fire engine/ambulance should be towed away.

> All it needs is two lines 3.7 m apart painted down the road plus passing places, then there is no debate who parked first and who caused the obstruction.

> On the other hand, outside the lines, everybody can use their legal right to park within 15 metres of a public highway.

Or double yellows down one side of the road?
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Skip:

Sure this is, I just put one in.

The people parking had no right to park like idiots, but alas they still did, and the tractor driver did have the right to drive down the road.

Tractor driver gets +1 for having a right to drive down the road, and -1 for crashing into cars = 0
Parkers get -1 for blocking the road = -1

Makes the tractor driver more in the right! (Some how my girlfriend despairs about my logic at times)
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rick Graham:

> On the other hand, outside the lines, everybody can use their legal right to park within 15 metres of a public highway.

Why does this not sound quite right to me? Surly I cannot park where ever I feel like a long as it is within 15 meters of a public highway?!

Also:

Rule 242
You MUST NOT leave your vehicle or trailer in a dangerous position or where it causes any unnecessary obstruction of the road.
Rick Graham on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Trangia:

> Or double yellows down one side of the road?

There is parking available down both sides of the road where the verge is wide enough.
We do not need more yellow lines.

Less boulders, some common sense, and neat parking.
Rick Graham on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:

> Why does this not sound quite right to me? Surly I cannot park where ever I feel like a long as it is within 15 meters of a public highway?!

I do not think it legal to park more than 15 metres from a public highway.
Obviously parking restrictions in place and private property rules apply.

Is that better?
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Guess the farmer hasn't lived there very long. If he had he would have an inkling that the road would be impassable to large vehicles on a nice Sunday and would plan to move sheep on a weekday.
> I guess whole thing deliberate.
> p.s. I come from a hill sheep farming family.

Then you'll know a weekend and weekday can often have no differentiation. There might have been a reason he was moving sheep back to the farm that day.. 6 day rule with some future market day trip next week, tupps back to isolation etc..
JoshOvki on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rick Graham:

Perfect, thank you
keith-ratcliffe on 14 Nov 2017
Fozzy on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

We had some dick who, despite leaving notes on their windscreen and trying to talk to them about it, repeatedly parked and blocked one of our main gates that we use when moving sheep, just so that they could avoid a 300yd walk to a parking area when walking their dog on our footpaths.
Plod didn’t care, until their car magically (well, on the loader’s forks...) moved that 300yds down the land on its own one day so we could get the sheep trailer through the gate. They’ve not parked there again....
lithos on 14 Nov 2017

Given next year is 100 anniversary and busy, is there going to be any organised solution ? Cone off roads and
open up the campsite s for parking, for cheap/free - maybe with some compensation - and a cafe selling teas to make a mint - for charity obvs...


Ian W - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to lithos:

From the photos, it appears there was a field available this year......
lithos on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Ian W:

but no organisation/willingness ?
Simon Caldwell - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Ian W:

Apparently the field was a quagmire and cars had to be towed out the previous day. Maybe he needs to spend some of his £3 fees on drainage work?
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to lithos:

> Given next year is 100 anniversary and busy, is there going to be any organised solution ? Cone off roads and
> open up the campsite s for parking, for cheap/free - maybe with some compensation - and a cafe selling teas to make a mint - for charity obvs...

Or park at rosthwaite, Langdale, wasdale, honister... and walk a little farther?
lithos on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to summo:

sure , but if you accept that's not going to happen without at least some nudge - what you gonner do ?
Ian W - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Yes, I suppose thats a distinct possibility there at this time of year......



Simon Caldwell - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to summo:

> Or park at rosthwaite, Langdale, wasdale, honister... and walk a little farther?

Most of those places would struggle to cope with that number of cars as well.
Perhaps they need to run a shuttle service from Keswick that day each year? Though you'll still have people who don;t want to pay even if the cost is less than the petrol used to drive to Seathwaite and back
Darren Jackson - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Maybe they should just rename Great Gable as Shite Gable; have it relegated as a Wainwright; and ban Trail magazine from ever mentioning it again?... And punch Bear Grylls?
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:
> Most of those places would struggle to cope with that number of cars as well.
> Perhaps they need to run a shuttle service from Keswick that day each year? Though you'll still have people who don;t want to pay even if the cost is less than the petrol used to drive to Seathwaite and back

That's why I was thinking if folk just chose which ever they fancied and it would create a natural spread, leave the shortest route from seathwaite for those whose legs can't cope with a longer trek to get there for 11 comfortably.
Depending on your line of attack parking at the slate mines up the hill is just as quick and easy as seathwaite.
Post edited at 20:06
wercat on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Darren Jackson:
Great Cable, the new zip wire summit?

Why BG Did he conquer its fearsome heights?
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Darren Jackson:

> Maybe they should just rename Great Gable as Shite Gable; have it relegated as a Wainwright; and ban Trail magazine from ever mentioning it again?... And punch Bear Grylls?

The congestion is a little unique for the F&R memorial there for 11/11.

As much as I'd like to blame bear grills, we can't this time.
Coel Hellier - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to lithos:

> Given next year is 100 anniversary and busy, is there going to be any organised solution ?

Maybe hold the event somewhere else, where there are bigger roads and a car park?
Darren Jackson - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to summo:

> As much as I'd like to blame bear grills, we can't this time.

I wasn't seeking to blame him: I was merely seeking to have him punched.
summo on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Darren Jackson:

> I wasn't seeking to blame him: I was merely seeking to have him punched.

Fair enough, why not!!
Tony Jones - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to

> As much as I'd like to blame bear grills, we can't this time.

How no?

I'm happy to apportion blame where it's deserved. That Audi looks like the kind of fancy car he might drive (with a bit of luck).

chrisgj on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:
Drainage work,I think it might take more than a few quid.
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=seathwaite+omm+2008&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB590GB590&hl=en-GB&prmd=ismvn&s...
Post edited at 20:22
Chris the Tall - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Coel Hellier:

> Maybe hold the event somewhere else, where there are bigger roads and a car park?

I believe the Summit of Great Gable was purchased by the Fell and Rock as a memorial to their members who died in the war, and was donated to the nation
CathS - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Coel Hellier:

>> Maybe hold the event somewhere else, where there are bigger roads and a car park?<<

>I believe the Summit of Great Gable was purchased by the Fell and Rock as a memorial to their members who died in the war, and was donated to the nation<

Correct, and if you've been to the summit you'll have also noticed there is a memorial plaque there, hence the annual memorial service, which dates back to 1924...
CathS - on 14 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I understand that inconsiderate parking by people doing the Three Peaks Challenge (along with the associated disturbance in the small hours of the night) is a more regular problem at this spot, which is the reason the boulders appeared along the verge near the farm entrance earlier this year.

Unfortunately I can foresee the long-term outcome of this unhappy situation being the loss of free parking and yet another extortionately priced pay-and-display car park
cander - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Trangia:

They did that at Buttermere, traffic went down one Sunday about 10 years ago handed out a bunch of tickets to howls of outrage, but since then the double yellows have been largely ignored and people park where ever they can squeeze in.
Dell on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

It's an absurd situation if you think about it, the living have had their cars damaged so the dead can be happy.
bedspring on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:
This is rather interesting. The Farmer has a Right in law to pass down this road. The drivers have no right to park, only a permission with a host of caveats, one being not to obstruct. If the farmer took reasonable steps (this is where the lawyers make their dosh) not to damage the cars, then he did nothing wrong. There is a celebrated case of a pedestrian walking over cars on a pavement which went to court, and the pedestrian was found not guilty.
If he was aware he had damaged the cars (which would have to be proved beyond reasonable doubt), under the Highways act he must take steps to inform the police (within 24 hours I believe).
I do hope the drivers, who are gits, have insurance companies which enjoy chatting with one of the most powerful lobby groups in the UK, the NFU.
Post edited at 07:49
marsbar - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Skip:

The drivers had no right to park where they did either.
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Dell:

I believe the sheep were alive
Stuart en Écosse - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I think this thread could become one of UKC's longest, with posts alternating between blaming the car owners for selfish parking and pointing out that the farmer had no right to do damage the cars.

wercat on 15 Nov 2017
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Guess the farmer hasn't lived there very long. If he had he would have an inkling that the road would be impassable to large vehicles on a nice Sunday and would plan to move sheep on a weekday.

> I guess whole thing deliberate.

> p.s. I come from a hill sheep farming family.

So in your world walkers in the Lake District can expect shops, pubs, cafes and service stations to work on a Sunday for their benefit but farmers shouldn't work so that they can park like total twunts?
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:
I found it curiously affirming that the cars (damaged) at the narrowest point (worst parking, "as of right") were some of the rather expensive variety.
Post edited at 09:39
bedspring on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

No absolutley, two horrific world wars and continuing conflicts, with milions dieing because of people being selfish and putting themselves first, just like these drivers.
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to bedspring:
have you ever driven round the bottom of Cat Bells at a weekend? - it's another spot where there seems to be a God given right. I've always gone on the principle that if you're too late to get a decent parking spot you have to go elsewhere, not just plonk it wherever you like. It's got worse since mobile phones I think - that seemed to start the idea you had a right even to stop on a motorway intersection roundabout to make or answer a call or reset satnav
Post edited at 10:11
bedspring on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

Certainly have. Odd really that people go to the Lakes and other places for beauty and possibly some solitude, and then proceed to go where every other bugger goes, where it is noisy and packed with other people. I tend to go to the other Seathwaite or the other Borrowdale, much quieter and easier to park
Simon Caldwell - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to CathS:

> I understand that inconsiderate parking by people doing the Three Peaks Challenge (along with the associated disturbance in the small hours of the night) is a more regular problem at this spot, which is the reason the boulders appeared along the verge near the farm entrance earlier this year.

So forcing three peak vehicles to park in the farmer's field, causing just as much disturbance to the farmer but a whole lot more to people camping there

Nevis-the-cat - on 15 Nov 2017


Is this farmer and his tractor available for hire?

We could do with him on any given Sunday at the Wrekin. Despite double yellows, the fecks park wherever - the fatter ones park by the path entrance (like those people who park in the disabled spots next the entrance to the gym).

I hate the piss boiling sense of entitlement that some drivers seem to have.

I'm tempted to administer my own wing mirror Series III derived justice to the suppurating wankpebbles.


and then punch Bear Ghrylls
defaid - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Nevis-the-cat:

Have a like.

(just for 'suppurating wankpebbles')
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I've heard that the tractor driver may have been called Adam and one of the cars belonged to someone called Matt, or might have been Justin as my source is not sure
Jim Hamilton - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to bedspring:

> I do hope the drivers, who are gits, have insurance companies which enjoy chatting with one of the most powerful lobby groups in the UK, the NFU.

Assuming it is the NFU, I wonder if they will deal with all the damage claims anyway if it was a deliberate action by the farmer.
Dave Hewitt - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

As a more general point, it's remarkable how lazy some hillwalkers are. There have been various blocked-gate etc problems with regard to lower Marilyns in parts of Wales and England - ie non-standard walking hills where there aren't regular paths and not very many people go. Usually this takes the form of an access issue getting steadily worse because of inconsiderate parking right next to the start of the easiest route up. Often as not there's some perfectly sensible and uncontentious parking space half a mile back along a quiet road, but some people seem very reluctant to go this extra half-mile - and then become outraged on social media etc when the local farmer gets annoyed (although not usually at the level of scraping the side off their car, admittedly). I've seen the same with bigger hills, too - people are setting off for perhaps a 6hr walk but decline to add an extra five minutes at the start in terms of considerate parking.
Andrew Kin - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I love the irony of flash cars getting damaged because the owners were either to tight to pay £3 parking or amazingly too lazy to park elsewhere and WALK a bit further.

I believe it was a memorial walk. I bet they remember not to park like idiots in future.
tripehound - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Hang on! The farmer has put boulders to stop cars parking on the hard areas beside the road. People have parked there for decades without issue. As a result people are having to park further down the lane where it is causing a problem. People are having now to park on the soft verges causing damage to the grass, and in other areas blocking the lane. Some of this ( not all ) is self inflicted by the farmer.

He is simply trying to stop parking on the roadside ( some of which are perfectly suited to parking) so he can charge people for parking in his field.
As for damaging vehicles, that is totally unacceptable.
Chris the Tall - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Dave Hewitt:

> As a more general point, it's remarkable how lazy some hillwalkers are.

To be fair, I suspect that Rock climbers are much worse. The numbers of illegally/inconsiderately parked cars around Stanage never ceases to amaze me. Unfortunately PDNPA have made the situation worse
MonkeyPuzzle - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Nevis-the-cat:

> We could do with him on any given Sunday at the Wrekin. Despite double yellows, the fecks park wherever - the fatter ones park by the path entrance (like those people who park in the disabled spots next the entrance to the gym).

Which is double stupid because the real action is at The Ercall, where faffergotgunz and seven friends are to be found hotboxing a 2005 Vauxhall Corsa worth less than the sound system in it.

Andrew Kin - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

Its not just walkers or climbers. Mountain bikers will argue for hours over their right to park at the start of a route without paying. Completely missing the irony of not wanting to ride their bikes for 10minutes more or to pay the parking charge.

I drive to my local wall but some of the desperate parking I see there on double yellows or up kerbs is rather embarrassing considering there is always spaces a small walk further away.
Chris the Tall - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Andrew Kin:

> Mountain bikers will argue for hours over their right to park at the start of a route without paying.

Do they ? I usually ride from home. On the rare occasions I use a trail centre I will always pay for parking, as it pays for the trails. My experience is that it is usually far easier to get a cyclist to part with their cash than a climber

> I drive to my local wall but some of the desperate parking I see there on double yellows or up kerbs is rather embarrassing considering there is always spaces a small walk further away.

I wish more walls would follow the Climbing Works and offer a free cup of tea to those who have cycled/walked there
Martin W on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to lithos:

> sure , but if you accept that's not going to happen without at least some nudge - what you gonner do ?

Why does the nudge have to come from outside? Why can't people's own consciences and sense of ethics provide the necessary nudge?

Basically: why should people constantly have to be told not to act like selfish lazy f*ckt*rds?

(Sorry, I don't have Nevis-the-cat's sublime facility with terms of abuse.)
lucozade - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Simon Caldwell:
Good idea that for sure. I do think something creative and sensible like this needs to be done.

I was going to be silly and suggest a zip wire line from Keswick but then again no-one would suggest running a zip wire alongside and past a lake in the Lakes...
Post edited at 16:20
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

> Do they ? I usually ride from home. On the rare occasions I use a trail centre I will always pay for parking, as it pays for the trails. My experience is that it is usually far easier to get a cyclist to part with their cash than a climber

> I wish more walls would follow the Climbing Works and offer a free cup of tea to those who have cycled/walked there

That seems a bit crap, rewarding people who are lucky enough to live close by over those who have to travel some distance in order to line the wall owners pockets
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to tripehound:


While the cars extended far far further than last year there were clearly far far more cars than on previous occasions and the blockage point was well within the area where people have been parking for years - this is the first time I've found the road so constricted on exit, though farm vehicles have had difficulty in the past, I believe.
deepsoup - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:
> That seems a bit crap, rewarding people who are lucky enough to live close by over those who have to travel some distance in order to line the wall owners pockets

Blimey. That's a pretty pessimistic view of a free cup of tea.
(Which will cost you 50p if you buy it - nobody is getting rich off this wheeze.)

They'll give you a free cuppa if you arrive by public transport too, btw. But if you still feel really aggrieved, you could always park up the road a bit round the corner and blag it. :-P
Post edited at 17:02
deepsoup - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:
> I know this won't be a popular post ..

Ha ha. 89 'likes' and counting. (One of them is mine - I'm with team Schadenfreude.)
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to deepsoup:

> Blimey. That's a pretty pessimistic view of a free cup of tea.

> (Which will cost you 50p if you buy it - nobody is getting rich off this wheeze.)


I just thought it seemed like a strange business model to reward those who had to make the least effort and spend the least money to reach the wall.

> They'll give you a free cuppa if you arrive by public transport too, btw. But if you still feel really aggrieved, you could always park up the road a bit round the corner and blag it. :-P

How do they verify it< I wonder whether you could get away with driving to the wall and marching in wearing a cycle helmet and an offensively tight pair of lycra shorts ;)

krikoman - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to deepsoup:

> Ha ha. 89 'likes' and counting. (One of them is mine - I'm with team Schadenfreude.)

The problem is though, if you'd parked your car on one side of the road, leaving plenty of space for, let's say a tractor and trailer to get through. Only for some dickhead to double park opposite you some time later. You both end up with damaged cars, so team Schadenfreude, turns into team vindictive bastard, really doesn't it?
lithos on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Martin W:

because thats how people behave ! you are trying to change their behaviour, just telling them, calling them
names and shouting at them hasn't worked wont work. So cone off the road provide an alternative / creative
solution and work that way


or come on here and rant how everyone else is a #insert_insult_of_choice and should do what the heroes do
Chris the Tall - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:
It's to alleviate the parking problems

Free Parking is never really free, so at any place with a "free" car parks those who don't use the car park subsidise those that do. And suffer the additional problems caused by them driving there and looking for a space.

No one is "lucky" to live in that part of Sheffield, but many will have chosen to do so because of easy access to amenities they use

It's time people got over this notion that they have a right to drive and park wherever they like.
Post edited at 17:56
Lion Bakes on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Selfish inconsiderate car drivers get their comeuppance. About time they learnt it is against the law to go round obstructing the highway. Hope they pay for the damage to the tractor.
toad - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

Thought the Ercall was packed out with knackered T4s full of homicidal MTBers.
Lion Bakes on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:

Yeah causing driving involves so much effort. Don't be so entitled and slfish about it.
MonkeyPuzzle - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to toad:

Ah yes, Nevis did say Sundays didn't he?
blackcat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to JoshOvki:The past few weeks ive been up there on weekends,there was one family who parked in front of one of the farm gates,none of the four had rucksacks,or walking boots,they had to ask me the way to great end,when i directed them the right way,i also took the opportunity to explain to them about parking theyre car in front of a farm gate.The same type of people,i call them newbie walkers who dont bother to educate themselves about the outdoors are leaving farmers field gates open and dropping litter.
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Lion Bakes:

WTH has a passing remark about something got to do with being "selfish and entitled"?

timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:

As a concept it probably works well in Sheffield but when it comes to hoping to see the practice adopted more widely it isn't going to work well in smaller towns and cities where walls need to draw customers from a wider area.
Pedro - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Darren Jackson:

Especially the Bear Grylls bit !!!!
birdie num num - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

I don't know what all the hoo hah is about. Those cars only need a bit of a waft over with a spray can. And maybe a plastic bag and some duck tape.
Dax H - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

From the point of view of someone who's workshop door was blocked every night by people going to the gym that opened opposite despite illuminated signage saying we needed 24 hour access due to being on call I have every sympathy with the farmer.

I fixed my problem by moving a car with my forklift, unfortunately it slipped off the forks and did a lot of damage but after a hour of asking the gym to get it moved and no one coming out to move it my options were move it or fail my customer by missing my contracted 2 hour call out deadline.

There were 50 or 60 people watching out of the gym windows or actually out in the car park. Apparently the cars owner was not happy at all but the owner of the gym is est described as a very nasty hard bastard and he told the car owner to do one or get hurt.
No one ever blocked my door again.
wercat on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to birdie num num:

wattle and daub and baling twine more like
summo on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Lion Bakes:
The cars didn't have to be there, the farmer lives and works there? Who is entitled?
Post edited at 19:47
Rick Graham on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to summo:

> The cars didn't have to be there, the farmer lives and works there? Who is entitled?

It is a public highway.

We all have rights and responsibilities.
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to Lion Bakes:

> Yeah causing driving involves so much effort. Don't be so entitled and slfish about it.

A mile or so of walking would require one hell of a lot less effort than the 50+ minute drive to my nearest wall.
ian caton on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:
Lol, that's a massive leap.

If it was lambing time, fair do's.

Not middle of November.

You think any self respecting farmer can't judge a gap to an inch or two, bet there are any damaged buildings or gateways.

I just know some who would do it deliberately, and it smells like that to me. That's all.

Over and out
Post edited at 19:54
timjones - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Lol, that's a massive leap.

> If it was lambing time, fair do's.

> Not middle of November.

As a sheep farmer I can assure you that you are wrong.

> You think any self respecting farmer can't judge a gap to an inch or two, bet there are any damaged buildings or gateways.

I can also assure you that just about all the farmers that I knowhave misjudged a gap at least once.

> I just know some who would do it deliberately, and it smells like that to me. That's all.

> Over and out

Neither side looks good in this sorry mess, but it is crass to suggest that anyone should alter their work patterns to allow for piss poor parking by others.

Lusk - on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

National Farmers Ununited, eh?
Trangia on 15 Nov 2017
In reply to tripehound:


> He is simply trying to stop parking on the roadside ( some of which are perfectly suited to parking) so he can charge people for parking in his field.

What does he charge?
TobyA on 16 Nov 2017
In reply to Chris the Tall:


> No one is "lucky" to live in that part of Sheffield, but many will have chosen to do so because of easy access to amenities they use

I live just up the hill, it's very respectable thank you very much!

Yours sincerely,

Outraged of S8
wercat on 16 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

I knew a very self respecting farmer who had a shotgun go off in his landrover cab - he showed us the damage, laughing ... He was a real gent, genuinely, in the nice sense of the word.
Ghastly Rubberfeet on 16 Nov 2017
In reply to Mick r:

The boulders were put there to prevent 3 peaks challenges parking close to the farm and disturbing the farmer's few hours of shut-eye. It (the noise and anti-social behaviour) was also impacting on the B&B business and the self catering business.
The New NickB - on 16 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

One thing that occurred to me about this situation, it's the double parking that is the problem. Chances are, if you have double parking, 50% of the people probably haven't parked unreasonably. Personally, if there is a field with a modest parking charge I'll use that, but unless indicated otherwise, parking on the highway is allowed.
ian caton on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:
Fair do's.

Enlighten me, just exactly what couldn't have waited until Monday morning or been done on the Friday?

Maybe he's into some super sophisticated multiple lambings per year with a contract to provide a certain number of lambs to the local abattoir every Sunday, but I will bet not.

Agreed re the gap, but not when they were squeezing between their own car and the forager or whatever.

Work patterns without barely a forethought. The urban and semi urban areas of the UK make up about about 5 % of the land mass of the UK. He, imo, should take it on board, in his work planning, that on Sunday, where he lives, it is not situation normal.

Mass parking anyone?
Post edited at 07:20
marsbar - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

Can you hear yourself?
bedspring on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:
> Fair do's.

> Enlighten me, just exactly what couldn't have waited until Monday morning or been done on the Friday?

> [....]

> Mass parking anyone?

I suspect what your missing here is that as an outdoor community we rely on Rights of Way. That is the situation as is. There is another discussion to be had, but that is irrelevant here.
This farmer apparently enforced theirs. Just as if you come across an obstruction on a footpath you can take reasonable means to remove it. The fact some people chose to leave £80k of cars blocking the Right of Way is not the core issue here.
A Right of Way is just the same as if it is the Footpath up to Gable or the M6 to Keswick. The people at varying degrees of fault here are;
The car parkers.
The Police who should be aware of issues.
The local council.
The FRCC who ran the event.
The NT (?) whose land the event is run.

All the farmer wanted to do was pass back and forwards as is his Right along a Highway.
Post edited at 07:59
timjones - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Fair do's.

> Enlighten me, just exactly what couldn't have waited until Monday morning or been done on the Friday?

> Maybe he's into some super so multiple lambings per year with a contract to provide a certain number of lambs to the local abattoir every Sunday, but I will bet not.

> Agreed re the gap, but not when they were squeezing between their own car and the forager or whatever.

> Work patterns without barely a forethought. The urban and semi urban areas of the UK make up about about 5 % of the land mass of the UK. He, imo, should take it on board, in his work planning, that on Sunday, where he lives, it is not situation normal.

> Mass parking anyone?

If you want an example we get a premium price for our lambs if we deliver them to the abattoir before 9am on a Monday morning. You don't need "super sophisticated multiple lambings per year" to achieve that, but you do need to be able to move sheep on a Sunday for grading and belly shearing etc.

However, it is none of our business why he might be working on a Sunday, why should anyone need to alter their work patterns in case a load of selfish arseholes obstruct the road to their business premises?
summo on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:
> Fair do's.

> Enlighten me, just exactly what couldn't have waited until Monday morning or been done on the Friday?

If you've had stock grazing elsewhere and you want to move them back to your land a trailer load at a time, before a truck takes them as the job lot next week. You'd have to comply with the 6 day rule.
Post edited at 08:07
Ian W - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Guess the farmer hasn't lived there very long. If he had he would have an inkling that the road would be impassable to large vehicles on a nice Sunday and would plan to move sheep on a weekday.

> I guess whole thing deliberate.

> p.s. I come from a hill sheep farming family.

Given you come from a hill sheep farming family, you don't seem to be too up on the ins and outs of hill farming.........
A Longleat Boulderer - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Ian W:
> Given you come from a hill sheep farming family, you don't seem to be too up on the ins and outs of hill farming.........

To be fair, I'm a farmers son and spend a fair bit of time dealing with livestock. We do consider when the lanes are likely to be congested... mainly because I'm not overly keen to reverse a tractor and trailer 20 times trying to go a few miles due to oncoming traffic. It's not hard to plan to use busy lanes at quieter times.

EDIT: of course, there may well be a reason why this farmer had no choice. I'm just talking in the general sense.
Post edited at 09:06
Ian W - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to A Longleat Boulderer:

Indeed, and I'm pretty confident Lakes farmers especially will plan around potential traffic all the time. But this goes waaayyyyy beyond congestion / inconvenience. And provision (albeit muddy) had been made for parking as discussed above, but not taken by up. My point was that the poster above makes claims to be involved in the industry, but doesnt seem to know much / is easily contradicted by those that do. FWIW, my knowledge of hill sheep farming doesn't extend much beyond that it involves sheep. And hills.



Andrew Kin - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:

It wasn't congestion. It was basically a road block by people who decided their needs outweighed that of others. Zero sympathy other than for those who parked first and essentially got dragged into the situation by the cars who parked opposite them.

Happens everywhere. Don't get me started on modern housing estates. Barely wide enough for two cars to pass but the ENTITLED residents see it as their right to park their car (Obviously they have filled up their driveway with 2 other cars) either up the kerb blocking the path or on road outside their house. Then the opposite house in same situation, rather than staggering the cars so at least one car can pass through, PARKS adjacent. Having to fold mirrors in to pass cars is stupid. I imagine this farmer just decided to join the stupid brigade.

Now that I have purchased a 3rd vehicle I am currently considering how stupid I want to be with my parking at home
wercat on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Ian W:

it seems to me that there is a third factor to blame here - no police presence on a very congested access road with a high degree of competition between competing motorists and time pressure together with more than possible conflict of between the interests of visitors and local community.
Ridge - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

> Mass parking anyone?

Great idea. Just let us know where you live and work, I'm happy to come along and inconvenience you by parking like an arsehole
Sir Chasm - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:
Yes, I mean we've got loads of spare police and there aren't many events that need covering on Remembrance Sunday.
Post edited at 10:10
wercat on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:
Yes, read my very carelessly worded post. I do know about the problems you quote and that is why I blamed a factor, rather than "the police"!!!!!

You could do better ...


GGggghhhhhrrrrrrrrrr....
Post edited at 10:13
Sir Chasm - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

> Yes, read my very carelessly worded post. I do know about the problems you quote and that is why I blamed a factor, rather than "the police"!!!!!

Then I look forward to you posting every time an incident occurs "of course this wouldn't have happened if the police had been here".

> You could do better ...

I know, but I have to deal with the carelessly worded posts I'm given.

> GGggghhhhhrrrrrrrrrr....

Tony?
wercat on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Sir Chasm:
^-^
. .
=--=


ho ho
Post edited at 10:44
Ian W - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

> it seems to me that there is a third factor to blame here - no police presence on a very congested access road with a high degree of competition between competing motorists and time pressure together with more than possible conflict of between the interests of visitors and local community.

Are we in such a collective mess that we need the police to control us when parking cars?
llechwedd on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to wercat:

> I found it curiously affirming that the cars (damaged) at the narrowest point (worst parking, "as of right") were some of the rather expensive variety.

The expensive vehicles often seem to be slew parked there, or taking up two spaces between cars, to create a 'sanitary' zone around them. Thus, a pleasing random pattern emerges, entirely in keeping with the the rural landscape.

The eye is drawn away though, from the irregular field boundaries, the randomly parked cars, the landforms softened over eons, to the jarring visuals provided by shiny door panels of the salient cars.
Over time though, these too will be softened by the impact of man in the Lakes, the erosive effects of a tractor and trailer magically transforming the monolith glare into a crinkly multifaceted panel of sparkling light, finding echoes in the sunkissed waters of Styhead Tarn.
davidbeynon on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to llechwedd:

Bravo!
Simon Caldwell - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Ghastly Rubberfeet:

> The boulders were put there to prevent 3 peaks challenges parking close to the farm and disturbing the farmer's few hours of shut-eye. It (the noise and anti-social behaviour) was also impacting on the B&B business and the self catering business.

Not sure I believe that - the parking area in the field is immediately on the other side of the wall from the boulders, and to get to it you need to drive even closer to the farm/B&B buildings.
A Longleat Boulderer - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to Andrew Kin:

> It wasn't congestion. It was basically a road block by people who decided their needs outweighed that of others. Zero sympathy other than for those who parked first and essentially got dragged into the situation by the cars who parked opposite them.

Is that not overly hysterical? A typical mid range tractor is 2.5m wide. A typical car is 1.8m wide. I doubt any of these people purposefully blocked a tractor. However I suspect they all underestimated how much room they needed to leave. And I say this as someone who drives tractors a lot...

In my view, this situation is people with poor spacial awareness/forethought coming up against someone who can't control their temper. And the result is clear.
wintertree - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to A Longleat Boulderer:

> In my view, this situation is people with poor spacial awareness/forethought coming up against someone who can't control their temper

I like to imagine the farmer doing this quite calmly and temper free, with a big Rick Sanchez grin on his face and listening to the sax solo part of Baker Street.
toad - on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to llechwedd:

Sweeps hat to the floor. Magnificent!
llechwedd on 17 Nov 2017
In reply to toad:
Thank you.

He's probably a bit too edgy for The Lakes, but perhaps Mr Tourette ( Master Signwriter) might be commissioned by Seathwaite Farm to create an advisory notice.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41i1ct1Q0eL.jpg
Post edited at 16:50
ian caton on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to marsbar:

Actually no.

Think I got out of the wrong side of the bed yesterday.
ian caton on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to timjones:

Apologies for provocative post.

I live where there is serious congestion at certain times and everybody works around the fact.

ian caton on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to Ridge:

Lol. You would struggle. I wasn't serious, just alluding to mass trespass and the fact that access feels increasingly restricted.

ian caton on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to A Longleat Boulderer:

I will run with that as the balanced view.
marsbar - on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to ian caton:

We all have days like that, don't worry about it.
Big Ger - on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to marsbar:

Some of us have lifetimes like that.
mysterion on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:
Yes, just imagine the righteous ROAD RAGE of these fools when they returned from their charidy event
Post edited at 22:33
keith-ratcliffe on 18 Nov 2017
In reply to Rog Wilko:
I spoke to someone from the FRCC about this and they said that the event used to be a fairly small scale club event with a dedicated group of members taking part. However the increased interest from the public about the Great War over these Centenary Years had significantly added to the numbers of people attending. Perhaps the coincidence of a good weather forecast added to the popularity. So I suggest that next year (Centenary of 1918) might be even bigger and that suitable arrangements should be made to prepare for a larger presence.
Jim Lancs on 19 Nov 2017
In reply to keith-ratcliffe:

You're right, the event is a FRCC event for their club members who have become rather outnumbered in recent years.

Perhaps there should be a move to switch focus to Scafell Pike which is a war memorial that predates the FRCC's purchase of Gable (and surrounding high tops) in 1924. Lord Leconfield gave the summit of Scafell Pike to the National Trust in 1919 in memory of all those in the Lake District who lost their lives, (although some accounts say to all those from 'the north of England').
CathS - on 19 Nov 2017
In reply to Jim Lancs:

People often park at Seathwaite to walk up Scafell Pike too (hence the 3 Peak Challenge problem)...

Looking at some FB posts on last weekend's incident, some of those whose cars were damaged had actually gone to walk up Scafell Pike, not attend the Memorial Event.
tripehound - on 19 Nov 2017
In reply to Trangia:

> What does he charge?

£3 I think
Trangia on 19 Nov 2017
In reply to tripehound:

Thanks. That's peanuts compared to the risk of getting your car scraped in a narrow road, particularly if there's more than one of you in the car. Why are some people so mean about paying for parking? It's less than the average cost of a pint......
Robert Durran - on 19 Nov 2017
In reply to Trangia:

> Why are some people so mean about paying for parking? It's less than the average cost of a pint......

I'm mean about paying for a pint. It's more than the average cost of a block of chalk.


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